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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

2002 

Annual Report 



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JfTOWrlffiOF ANDOVER 

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http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2002ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2002 ANNUAL REPORT 



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PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

2002 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 6 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 87 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 22 

BUILDING DIVISION 22 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 24 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 23 

HEALTH DIVISION 25 

PLANNING DIVISION 29 

PLUMBING & GAS 23 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 30 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 59 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 167 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 166 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 62 

FINANCE & BUDGET 13 

ASSESSORS 13 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 14 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 15 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 16 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 95 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 33 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 86 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 94 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 174 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 171 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 78 

JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 93 

MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 93 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 41 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 45 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 46 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 47 

FORESTRY 48 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 50 

PARKS & GROUNDS 47 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 48 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 49 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 36 

ANIMAL CONTROL 38 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 37 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 38 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 36 

RECORDS DIVISION 37 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 92 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 53 

ENGINEERING 53 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 57 

HIGHWAY 54 

SEWER 56 

SOLID WASTE 55 

WATER 55 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 76 

TOWN CLERK 20 

TOWN COUNSEL 75 

TOWN MANAGER 4 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 117 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 95 

VETERANS SERVICES 71 

WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 175 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 65 



Town of Andover 

Board of Selectmen 



2002 



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2002 Board of Selectmen, left to right: Brain P. Major; Mary K. Lyman; Ted E. Teichert; 
John P. Hess; and Chairman, Raymond E. Hender. 



Tfte 7b w« of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. 

Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasures 

of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, and learning. As resources and energy 

allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

Vision Statement of the Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 

(978) 623-8200 

www. town. andover. ma. us 



Fellow Townspeople: 

As Andover, the United States, and the rest of the world advanced further into the 21 st 
Century we realized that the change of millennium portended a profound change in our world 
and in our community. World events, which occupy our daily lives and command a significant 
presence on and in the broadcast and print media, continue to affect our Town. We have been 
shaken by acts of terrorism, the national and worldwide economic downturn caused businesses to 
scale back or close local facilities, and many of our fellow citizens have felt the devastation of 
downsizing. A series of personal income tax cuts at the State level and three years of falling 
stock prices pushed the Commonwealth of Massachusetts into a budget crisis. The crisis at the 
State level translates into reduced state aid to communities, and creates a challenge for local 
government. In spite of pressures and challenges beyond our control, this wonderful Town 
continues to function and to provide an exemplary school system for our students, and an 
attractive, well-maintained, and safe community for its citizens. 

In the past year our major construction projects have moved forward - with completion 
on one, and progress on the others. The High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill Middle Schools 
opened in September - on schedule! These beautiful and functional buildings are the first new 
schools in Andover in more than twenty years. The new schools, along with the previously built 
facilities, will provide our elementary and middle school students with the space they need for 
many more years. The sewer system work in the downtown area and the South Main Street and 
West Andover sections is on schedule. But the new Public Safety Center stands out as the 
exception. Harsh weather conditions in the first winter of construction, and subsequent labor and 
material shortages prolonged the construction schedule. The first phase is complete and occupied 
by the Police Department. The Fire Department relocated to temporary quarters on Spring Grove 
Road to allow for the razing of the old Center and the construction of the new Central Fire 
Station. The projected completion date is about one year beyond the original target date. 

A major step toward developing a long-term "vision" of Andover and providing a basis 
for updating our twenty-year-old Master Plan was accomplished with the formation of the Vision 
21 Committee. A diverse group of Andover citizens were nominated by the Strategic Planning 
Task Force and appointed by the Town Manager. In December, the Committee began the task of 
soliciting citizen input for the visioning process. 



Support for Andover's youth and senior citizens continues to be demonstrated by the 
activities of the Andover Youth Foundation and the Senior Center Site Study Task Force. The 
Youth Foundation is in the process of raising private funds for the construction of a new Youth 
Center on a Town-owned site in West Andover. The Senior Center Site Study Task Force 
engaged the services of an architect to assist them in conducting an extensive survey of site 
alternatives and to develop preliminary plans for a new Senior Center. Their efforts have 
produced a site recommendation and the planning process is proceeding. 

As the national, state, and local governments continue to suffer from the effects of a 
"soft" economy and the current geo-political environment, Andover must continue to 
demonstrate that we are a community of citizens who can work together to define the problems 
and implement the solutions to see us through to better times. The weeks preceding the Annual 
Town Meeting can be filled with tensions and high emotions. Members of the School 
Committee, the Finance Committee, the Board of Selectmen, and Town and School officials 
meet regularly as the Strategic Planning Task Force to promote cooperation in problem solving 
and short-term and long-term planning. 

On behalf of the Board of Selectmen, I encourage you to exercise the unique opportunity 
afforded by Town Meeting to participate in the governing process. Study the Warrant and 
Finance Committee Report, attend meetings, ask questions, and go to Town Meeting and vote. 



ectfully submitted, 




Raymond E. Hender 

Chairman 

Andover Board of Selectmen 



)OV 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 

(978) 623-8200 

www. town. andover. ma. us 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

The year 2002 presented us with a variety of fiscal and economic challenges as well as 
the opportunities to celebrate the strengths of our community. From the continued poor condition 
of our state and national economies, to the preoccupation on physical security, to a nation 
preparing for war, there was certainly no loss of things to worry about. The good news is that the 
fabric of our community remained as strong as ever. The Memorial Day Parade and Observances 
provided an occasion to display our patriotism. Families enjoyed a wonderful 4 l of July 
celebration at The Park. The popular annual pancake breakfast and concert had record 
attendance. These traditions help us reconfirm that Andover is a great place to live and raise a 
family, and that our strong spirit of community is alive and well. 

Voters at the 2002 Annual Town Election re-elected Mary K. Lyman to the Board of 
Selectmen. Christopher G. Smith was elected to the School Committee. He filled the vacancy left 
by Eric J. Nadworny who chose not to run for re-election. 

Attendance at the 2002 Annual Town Meeting hit an all time record high of over 2,100 
voters! The Town Meeting was conducted over four days in late April and took up a warrant of 
63 articles. Town Meeting appropriated a SI 05 million annual operating budget for Fiscal Year 
2003. Some of the significant actions of note were: $1.8 million for asbestos removal at the West 
Elementary School; $975k for improvements at the Water Treatment Plant; and a number of 
important Zoning Bylaw amendments. Two articles in particular were passionately supported 
and debated but ultimately were voted down. They were the acceptance of the "Community 
Preservation Act" and a proposal to re-zone a portion of a 22.5 acre parcel of land abutting the 
Tewksbury line from Single Family Residence to Industrial in exchange for some new playing 
fields. 

Town Meeting also voted 1,366 in favor and 692 opposed to present a $1.13 million 
Proposition 2% Override referendum question at a Special Town Election for the purpose of 
funding additional school expenses. At the Special Town Election on June 11 th the voters spoke 
and the override question failed in all nine precincts by a margin of 4,937 to 2,881. 

Two new Andover public schools were completed in 2002 and opened their doors to 
students at the start of the school year on September 5 th . The High Plain Elementary and Wood 
Hill Middle Schools consist of 48,580 and 75,895 square feet of space respectively, and share a 
kitchen, auditorium and mechanical room. The School Building Committee, chaired by Mark B. 
Johnson, deserves much credit for opening the schools on time and within budget. The official 
ribbon cutting and opening of the new schools was held on December 8 th . 



The new Public Safety Center is over 50% complete. The Police Department moved into 
their part of the complex in August. The Fire Department vacated Central Station and has been 
dispersed to temporary quarters around Town. The old Central Station was demolished in August 
and the new Central Fire facility is scheduled to be completed in the Fall of 2003. 

On a more solemn note - Several memorial events were held here in Andover on 
September 1 1 th to commemorate the first anniversary of a terrible day that changed our world 
forever. It was good to see the people of Andover come together to remember and honor the 
thousands of innocent people and brave public servants who lost their lives on that fateful day. 
As the war on terrorism is waged on many fronts across the globe, let us continue to have the 
strength to stand together as a nation and the wisdom to promote peace and freedom for all. 

At the General State Election in November, Senator Susan C. Tucker and Representative 
Barry R. Finegold were both re-elected for another term. Andover resident Barbara LTtalien was 
also elected to the new House of Representatives, 1 8 th Essex District seat consisting of Andover 
precincts 1, 7, and 8, and a number of precincts in Boxford, Georgetown, Haverhill, Methuen, 
and North Andover. 

The Town Government Review Committee completed its two-year review of the Town's 
charter and form of government. They reaffirmed our long-standing Selectmen-Town Manager- 
Open Town Meeting form of government. They also offered a series of recommendations to 
improve the way the Town organization conducts business. 



Continued good government in Andover requires your active participation. Please plan to 

25 th and attend Town Me 

Respectfully submitted, 



vote at the Annual Town Election on March 25 th and attend Town Meeting starting on April 28 th 




^Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



)OV 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 





Town Offices 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover.MA 01810 

(978) 623-8200 

www.town.andover.ma.us 

MEMORANDUM 



TO: Board of Selectmen 

FROM: Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager 

SUBJ: 2002 Highlights/ Accomplishments 

DATE : December 3 1 , 2002 



TOWN MANAGER/BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

At the Annual Town Election, Mary K. Lyman was re-elected to the Board. 

During the Summer, Student Intern Orlando Pacheco, from the University of New 
Hampshire, went to work for the Town of Amesbury as the Mayoral Aide. He was replaced 
by Nicholas DiRosario also from the University of New Hampshire. 

The Legislature re-drafted the State House of Representative districts and created a new 1 8 th 
Essex District made up of numerous towns including Andover's precincts 1, 7 and 8. 
Barbara A. LTtalien, an Andover resident, was elected to the House of Representatives for 
this new district. 

FINANCE & BUDGET 

Successfully collected $1,000,000 in back taxes and interest for the property at 16 Haverhill 
Street and returned $93,000 in unclaimed checks back to the Town's account. 

Borrowed funds for two loans: $17,600,000 short-term for six months at 1.18% and 
$12,000,000 long-term for twenty years at 3.99%. 

Maintained the Town's Aaa Bond rating. 

Completed the tri-annual Town-wide property re-evaluation program. 

Expanded information available to the public on the Town's web site. 

ACCOUNTING/RETIREMENT 

After the settlement of union contracts, the Department processed the new pay plans and 
retroactive payments for hundreds of employees. 



The staff was active in the on-going implementation of GASB 34 including the Town-wide 
valuation. 

The Retirement Board purchased a comprehensive software package to fully automate all 
aspects of retirement accounting and membership records. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Became the first library in New England to offer audiobooks on MP3 devices. Check it out 
at http://www.mhl.org/collections/eaudio/ . 

After opening the new Young Adult area for middle and high school age students last year, 
the Library opened the Teen-Z room which is being used each day and evening. In addition, 
the Young Adult Department offers 6 laptop computers for the students use. 

Music for Tots - The Library's Hall became a meeting place for young mothers and babies 
for the very popular Music for Tots music and movement program for children from birth 
through 36 months. 

The 24/7 Reference Service that allows patrons to chat with a "live" librarian continued to 
see increased usage. The service won a Certificate of Achievement in Innovation from the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Procured $150,600 in State and Federal grants. The grants supplement the Community 
Policing initiatives and allow the Department to maintain other informative and educational 
programs for the community such as the New Horizon Collaborative which was expanded 
last year to serve the youths living at both Memorial Circle and Brookside Estates. A State 
equipment grant has allowed the Department to purchase much needed weapons and 
protective gear further enhancing the ability to respond to any threat or crisis. 

Continues to see a large increase in the number of drug and alcohol violations. The 
Department seized approximately 1,400 bags of heroin, more than a pound of marijuana, 
more than 175 grams of cocaine and approximately 100 miscellaneous pills which combined 
for a street value of more than $25,000. 

Patrolman Robin Cataldo was chosen as the Lawrence Exchange Club's Andover Policeman- 
of-the- Year. Officer Cataldo was chosen for her outstanding service to the community and, 
especially, the residents and youth of Memorial Circle. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Again this year, Andover experienced a very good fire safety year. There was no loss of life 
due to fire, and civilian injuries were kept to a minimum. As in the past, a very aggressive 
Fire Prevention Program is the main factor contributing to this success. 



7 

OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8209 



During the Summer, following the completion of the new Police Station at the Public Safety 
Center, the Department successfully relocated the Central Fire Station to a building in Spring 
Grove Cemetery. The administrative offices were temporarily located in the new Police 
Department. The Central Fire Station was demolished and the construction of the new Fire 
Station began on its current site. 

Administrative Deputy Chief James R. Lynch was awarded the Andover Firefighter of the 
Year award by the Lawrence Exchange Club. Deputy Chief Lynch was given this award for 
his overall 30-year dedication and commitment to not only the Andover Fire Department but 
to the Town of Andover as well. Lieutenant Armand Guilmette and Firefighters Philip 
Boulanger and Daniel Guillet also received special commendation from the Exchange Club 
for their involvement in the Merrimack River ice rescue on December 14, 2002. 

A major accomplishment has been the upgrade from Class 4 to Class 3 by the Insurance 
Service Organization (ISO). The direct result is a savings in property insurance for 
businesses and industries. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

PLANNING DIVISION 

Planning Board 

Secured a $25,000 grant from the State through Executive Order 418 to complete a 
Community Development Plan (Housing, Economic Development, Open Space and 
Transportation). The research, data, and recommendations will be used to update the 
corresponding sections in the 1992 Master Plan. 

Main Street Committee 

The Committee submitted the 75% plans to the Massachusetts Highway Department in 
August. 

Key streetscape selections (lights, benches, tree species, curbing, etc.) were determined in 
October. 

Vision 21 Committee 

The Committee secured a $5,000 grant from the state for the visioning process. 
The Committee held its first of three public input sessions in December. 

HEALTH DIVISION 

Instituted Meningococcal Meningitis Immunization Program for High School 
Seniors/College Freshmen. 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



Assisted with the development of the Town's Sewer Connection Permit protocol for the 
South Andover/West Andover sewer expansion project. 

Expanded the Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program from six to nine 
communities. 

Implemented the new State Regulations for Summer Camps and licensed sixteen camps. 

BUILDING DIVISION 

Joint inspections (building, electrical, plumbing and fire prevention inspectors) enabled the 
opening of the new High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill Middle Schools on time for the 
2002-2003 school year. 

Joint inspections enabled the life safety aspects of the new Public Safety Center to be 
completed allowing the occupancy of the first phase (Police Department) of the Public Safety 
Center project in August. 

• There were three Comprehensive Permits (Avalon Bay, Ballardvale Crossing and 
Coachman's Ridge) issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals which will result in 263 
additional apartment units to be built in Andover in the near future. 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 

■ Regulations were adopted pursuant to the Andover Wetland Protection By-Law and project 
submission guidelines were adopted to streamline and improve the review process. 
Similarly, the Commission adopted an expedited review procedure for simpler projects that 
would otherwise be subject to administrative delays. 

Rules for the use of Conservation Land (184 parcels, comprising approximately 1,800 acres) 
were revised for the first time since their adoption in 1978. 

■ Existing trail paths were cleared and new trails were created on a number of Conservation 
land parcels together with improved parking and access points. 

A new canoe launch was opened at the Pole Hill Conservation area providing a further access 
point to the Shawsheen River. 

TOWN CLERK 

Completed the first stage of the Town Offices' vault inventory. 

Became a passport agent for the U. S. Department of State, processed 1361 applications and 
generated $25,700 in new revenue. 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDCWER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



Successfully managed and completed four elections including the Special Override Election 
in June. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 

A new recreational services software package was fully implemented. Information is stored 
in a database for ease of entry and retrieval; tracking, participant updates, employee/tax 
receipt purposes and on-going registration, etc. 

Partnered with a national company to provide online courses to residents. Hundreds of 
educational opportunities for computer and non-computer courses are available via email or 
online. 

Community Services celebrated their 30-year birthday in the Fall. 

Three Eagle Scout projects at Recreation Park and Pomp's Pond helped to beautify the trails 
and walkways. 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 

The Senior Center and the School Department are engaged in a collaborative effort which 
provides for one-on-one senior mentors for students in grades 1 and 2 at the Bancroft School. 
A formal orientation and training program was introduced during this second year of 
operation. 

"Answering The Call", a one-hour film, was produced by the Senior Center Cable TV crew. 
Nine WWII veteran men and women were interviewed and related their war experiences. The 
film premiered at the Collins Center on November 3 rd with over 500 townspeople in 
attendance. 

YOUTH SERVICES 

Created quality programs in four areas: recreation, social, support and education for over 
7,000 participants. 

Collaborated with Friends of Andover Girls Hockey to raise the necessary funds to field the 
first ever AHS Girls Varsity Hockey Team. 

Repeated the success of previous Summer programs with the highest numbers ever. The 
AYS Summer Program maintained a diverse offering of clinics, trips, and activities for 
young people in middle school and high school. All trips were filled to capacity and 
feedback was resoundingly positive. The AYS Summer Program is unique in its program 
content, participation, operating staff, and overwhelming success. 



OVER. M 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

New High Plain Elementary School and Wood Hill Middle School opened on September 5 th 
with construction 97% complete. 

Phase I of the new Public Safety Center was occupied in August and construction of Phase II 
is underway. The Fire Department was temporarily re-located to Spring Grove Cemetery, 
Ballardvale Fire Station and West Andover Fire Station. 

West Elementary School projects completed: Phase I asbestos remediation, new electrical 
distribution and switchgear system and various mechanical upgrades. 

School Energy Conservation projects were completed and partially funded by Massachusetts 
Electric Energy Program for a total annual savings of $37,436. 

The expansion program at the Spring Grove Cemetery created over 2,000 new gravesites. 

The Town was awarded the designation of "Tree City" for the third consecutive year and 
received a growth award from the National Arbor Day Foundation. 

Two new Superintendents were hired to fill vacancies: Ralph Knight - Mechanical/Electrical 
Division and Randy Pickersgill - Parks, Grounds, Forestry and Cemetery. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Engineering Division 

Existing sidewalks were reconstructed on Walnut Avenue and School Street (Central Street 
to South Main Street) measuring 5,650 feet at a cost of $321,880. New sidewalks were 
constructed on Chestnut Street from Upland Road to Highland Road; Forest Hill Drive; 
Cross Street from Forest Hill Drive to High Plain Road and High Plain Road from Pendant 
Court to High Meadow Lane totaling 10,050 feet at a cost of $728,772. Survey work was 
also performed for future sidewalk construction on Salem Street from Prospect Street to 
Route 125. 

Construction on the new traffic signals at the Dascomb and Lovejoy Road intersection was 
started this year and is scheduled for completion in the Spring of 2003. 

Work was completed to estimate, quantify and prepare documents for the reconstruction and 
resurfacing of fourteen Town roads, fully or partially, totaling 6.8 miles in length. 

The design, installation or repair of 448 feet of storm drains and underdrains totaling $28,168 
was performed at seven various streets. 

Highway Division 

The Winter of 2001-02 produced 23.5 inches of snow to fight. 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



Paved Lowell Street, Beacon Street, Frye Circle, Tessier Drive, Burnham Road, Dufton 
Road, North Street, Chandler Road and Gavin Circle. 

Installed over 10,000 linear feet of bituminous curbing at various locations, and built or re- 
built 30 handicap sidewalk ramps throughout the Town. 

Water Treatment Division 

Processed 2.377 billion gallons of water meeting or exceeding all federal and state 
regulations. 

• Received the First Place Award for the 2002 Water Quality Report for excellence in 
communication under the Safe Drinking Water Act. 

Water and Sewer Division 

The exterior of the steel tanks at Prospect Hill and Wood Hill were painted cleaned, 
disinfected and inspections were performed to the interior of both tanks. 

Hand-held meter reading computers are now in use by the meter readers. 

Sewer Projects 

The sewer construction was completed on the following projects: 1) the first of four 
contracts in the Ballardvale area, 2) the entire Cross Street and Forest Hill Drive area and 3) 
the Shawsheen River Interceptor sewer. Sewer construction was started in the Rogers Brook 
area. 

Solid Waste Division 

The Town expanded its curbside collection of leaves from 6 weeks to 12 weeks to maintain 
our Department-Approved Recycling Program (DARP) status. 

Expanded the Curbside Recycling Program to include plastics #3 thru #7. 

Established the Town's ability to earn a "paper credit" when the price for the mixed 
residential paper regionally is above $30.00/ton. The savings in the second half of 2002 was 
over $17,000. 

The Town sold waste deliveries over the GAT to the Town of Lexington which generated a 
savings of $99,500. 



)dv4 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



FINANCF A. MTDCT.T DFPARTMFNT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2003 Budget was released on February 1, 
2002. During the months of February, March, and April meetings were held with the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and department heads to review the budget and 
warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1 ,300 households. The 
Annual Town Meeting began on April 22, 2002 and the Fiscal Year 2003 operating budget 
(Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $105,179,730. This budget was an increase of 8.3% from 
the fiscal year 2002 operating budget of $97,138,599. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 2002 are as follows: 

Provided staff support to the Strategic Planning Task Force. 

Prepared the Town Manager's Recommended FY-2003 Budget. 

Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY-2004 - FY-2008. 

Provided staff support to the Finance Committee. 

Produced the 2002 Finance Committee Report 

Provided staff support to the Andover Cable Advisory Committee. 

Worked with staff, financial advisor and Moody's Investors Service to maintain Andover' s Aaa 
bond rating. 

ASSESSORS 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing of real estate and personal property 
accounts and motor vehicle excise taxes in the Town as well as defending all appeals of these 
taxes. The three-member Board is also responsible for the awarding of nearly 350 property tax 
exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled 
veterans, widows and widowers and individuals classified as blind. 

The Assessors must conduct revaluations of all' property on a triennial (every three years) 

13 



basis. They are completing a revaluation for Fiscal Year 2003. The next required revaluation 
will be conducted for Fiscal Year 2006 but, if needed, interim adjustments may be made for 
Fiscal Year 2004. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of 
Revenue guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amounts of property and ownership related 
information that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on 
most property and the total valuations are available on the Town's web site. More than 1,000 
requests for public records and information are received and processed on an annual basis. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 2002 the Central Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,635 purchase orders 
and 2,256 Requests for Payment for the Town and 3,967 purchase orders for the School 
Department. During the year there were approximately 40 bids and 9 Requests for Proposals that 
were advertised and officially opened. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts 
available to cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 2002 Andover initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids as 
well as participated in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts 
General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through 
the bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, 
road salt, water treatment chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, HVAC services, plumbing services, 
electrical services, elevator services, office supplies, equipment and furniture, and school athletic 
and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major Requests for Proposals and bids solicited in 2002 were: 

Installation of concrete floors in basement crawl spaces - Phase 2 - Doherty Middle School 

Air Handling Unit Direct Digital Controls Upgrade - Doherty Middle School 

Sewerage Works Improvements - Contact No. 2 Ballardvale Road Area 

Electric Service Renovation and Power Distribution Upgrade - West Elementary School 

Re-roofing Project at the Water Department building on Lewis Street 

Gymnasium hardwood floor replacement project - Bancroft School 

Unit Ventilator Direct Digital Controls Upgrade - Doherty Middle School 

School furniture and equipment for the new Elementary and Middle Schools at Cross Street 

and High Plain Road 

One new 2002 or current model year Static Compactor for DPW 

Collection and transportation of refuse for Town 

Sidewalk Reconstruction - School Street and Walnut Avenue 

Heating System Upgrade Phase I - Shawsheen School 

Custodial Supplies 

Design and Construction Administration Services for West Elementary School Asbestos 

Abatement and Remodeling Project 

Asbestos Abatement and Remodeling Work Part I work at the West Elementary School 

Library HVAC Upgrade at the West Middle School 



14 



Granular Activated Carbon Change Out Odor Control System for the Water Treatment Plant 

Miscellaneous Road Materials and Concrete Pipe 

Cooperative Bid for Highway Rock Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Transportation Improvement Project - Dascomb Road/Lovejoy Road/ Acorn Drive 

School Equipment - Phase II for the new Elementary and Middle Schools at Cross Street and 

High Plain Road 

Five new 2003 or current model Law Enforcement Vehicles 

Sidewalk Construction - Forest Hill Drive, Cross Street and High Plain Road 

Maintenance and Service of DYNAC SCADA System at the Water Department 

Data Verification Program for Assessor's Office 

Storm Water Management Program for the Town 

Senior Center Site Evaluation, Development Planning and Schematic Design Services 

Real property acquisition for Conservation/Passive Recreation 

Consulting and Bid Evaluation for Town Insurance 

Lease of space on Public Safety Center Monopole 

Billing Service for Emergency Ambulance Service for Andover Fire Department 

The Office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for administering the contract 
compliance of Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the property and 
casualty insurance and risk management for all Town and School Departments. The Human 
Resources Department, however, handles the health and personal insurance for both the Town 
and School Departments. The Central Purchasing Office processed approximately 54 casualty 
and property claims over the year and was able to recover $48,403.29 for the Town. 

COT I FCTOR/TRF A SI IRFR 

The Collector/Treasurer's Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Some of the highlights for 2002 are as follows: 

Collected one million dollars in taxes and interest on the foreclosed property located at 16 
Haverhill Street. 

Successfully processed over 50,000 real estate and personal property bills and payments as well 
as 31,000 excise tax bills and payments. 

■ Borrowed $22,600,000 for 6 months at an interest rate of 1.4419%; $17,600,000 for 6 months 
at an interest rate of 1.188%; and $12,000,000 for 20 years at an interest rate of 3.998%. 

Dollars for Scholars is a national non-profit organization. The Andover chapter was formed 
in 1997 with the acceptance of Article 27 at the 1997 Annual Town Meeting. During the year, 
several fundraising events were held and donations were received from many Andover residents 
that resulted in the awarding of 39 scholarships to deserving Andover students pursuing further 
education in the amount of $40,700. 



15 



Balance: January 1 , 2002 $141,558 

Income, Donations, Gifts 428,022 

Expenses, Scholarships 41 ,377 

Balance: December 3 1 , 2002 $528,203 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for maintaining and improving the 
utilization of computerized data in municipal operations including financial records, word 
processing/spreadsheet/database files, electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. 
Major functions of this division are: network administration, financial application support and 
reporting, user support for office integration software, and hardware/software/operating system 
maintenance and upgrades. The Information Systems Division supports all users of the network 
and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. Maintaining 
the integrity and improving the accessibility of all data on the network are priorities, especially 
since most users rely on network resources for daily operations 

Highlights for 2002 include: 

Programmed procedures within the utility billing software to electronically accept and 
process water meter readings; assisted Water Department in implementing hand held meter 
reader system. 

Performed data conversion for the implementation of new Retirement System software. 

Upgraded the hardware/software of approximately one-quarter of the computer desktops used 
on the network, now using Windows 2000/XP operating system which dramatically increases 
security and management features. 

Completed the upgrade of network servers from NT to Windows2000 which increases the 
security of the network. Also upgraded the Exchange software on the e-mail server for 
increased reliability and remote access features. 

Upgraded DSL service to provide faster internet access and email transmission, and to 
support future internal web publishing of information such as GIS data. 



16 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



Motor Vehicle Bills 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



Purchase Orders 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



$1,300,000 

$1,250,000 

$1,200,000 

$1,150,000 

$1,100,000 

$1,050,000 

$1,000,000 

$950,000 

$900,000 

$850,000 

$800,000 



Investment Income 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



Town Web Site Hits (Mthly. Avg.) 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



17 



TOWN MEETING APPROVED 
OPERATING BUDGET - ARTICLE 4 











$ Increase 


°/o Increase 




BUDGET 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


FY2002 to 


FY2002 to 




FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 


FY2003 


FY2003 


General Government 


$5,358,130 


$5,612,926 


$5,642,188 


$29,262 


0.5% 


Plant and Facilities 


$3,563,129 


$3,661,316 


$3,875,269 


$213,953 


5.8% 


Capital Improvements Projects 


$2,565,000 


$1,955,000 


$2,337,000 


$382,000 


19.5% 


Public Safety 


$10,260,811 


$10,425,623 


$10,699,715 


$274,092 


2.6% 


Public Works 


$5,392,123 


$5,520,137 


$5,495,242 


-$24,895 


-0.5% 


Water 


$3,262,169 


$3,116,203 


$3,435,350 


$319,147 


10.2% 


Sewer 


$1,836,675 


$1,708,741 


$1,921,852 


$213,111 


12.5% 


School 


$39,063,885 


$42,554,797 


$46,819,506 


$4,264,709 


10.0% 


Greater Lawrence Technical HS 


$159,847 


$73,882 


$77,297 


$3,415 


4.6% 


Library 


$2,238,611 


$2,345,141 


$2,362,364 


$17,223 


0.7% 


Fixed 


$18,267,115 


$19,314,833 


$21,120,947 


$1,806,114 


9.4% 


Compensation/Reserve 


$210,000 


$850,000 


$1,393,000 


$543,000 


63.9% 


OPERATING BUDGET 


$92,177,495 


$97,138,599 


$105,179,730 


$8,041,131 


8.3%o 


Dedicated Revenues 


-$2,082,604 


-$1,642,750 


-$2,253,991 






NET OPERATING BUDGET 


$90,094,891 


$95,495,849 


$102,925,739 


$7,429,890 


7.8°/o 



Town 
28% 



ARTICLE 4 - FY2003 

$105,179,730 




Schools 

45% 



Fixed J 


i V 

Capital 


Enterprise 


20% 


Funds 




Improvement 


5% 




Projects 






2% 





18 



TAX RATE RECAP 



EXPENDITURES 

Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures: 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgements 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Other amounts 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 
Total Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 
Overlav Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 

Estimated Receipts from State: 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 

Total from State 

Estimated Local Receipts: 

Local Estimated Receipts 

Offset Receipts 

Enterprise Funds 

Revolving Funds (53e 1/2) 
Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Revenue: 

Free Cash - Articles 

Other Available Funds 
Total Other Appropriations 

Free Cash - Operating Budget 

Total Estimated Receipts 
Total Property Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES 



FINAL 


FINAL 


FINAL 


FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 


$94,792,161 


100,219,511 


108,183.206 






1,000 



1,000 



140,580 

71,033 
211,613 


436,845 

419,397 

168.226 

1,025,468 


157 



63.944 

65,101 


1,045,448 

1.000.840 

$97,050,062 


1,112,644 

980.884 

$103,338,507 


1,418,491 

958.499 

$110,625,297 


10,671,332 
10.107 


11,626,528 



11,110,423 
315 


10,681,439 


11,626,528 


11,110,738 


7,409,850 

1,335,375 

9,534,424 



18,279,649 


7,803,000 

1.393,010 

9,579,747 



18,775,757 


7,907,000 
1,421,200 

10,568,992 


19,897,192 


1,760,319 

347.229 

2,107,548 


2,555,912 

249.740 

2,805,652 


2,623,476 

862.791 

3,486,267 


1,050,000 


300,000 


300,000 


32,118,636 
64.931.426 


33,507,937 
69.830,570 


34,794,197 
75.831,100 


$97,050,062 


103,338.507 


110,625,297 



VALUATIONS AND 
TAX RATES 

TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 
EQUALIZED TAX RATE 



FINAL 


FINAL 


FINAL 


FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 


$3,972,909 


$4,496,094 


$5,913,652 


14.92 


14.13 


11.63 


20.59 


19.57 


16.54 


16.34 


15.53 


12.82 



19 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records and to act in the best interest of the community and 
the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality services. 



During 2002, the Town Clerk's Office managed the Town's Annual Election, a Special Town 
Election, the State Primary and Election and the Annual Town Meeting. In preparation, continuous 
training was given to election officials and on-going improvements to overall procedures were made. 
This was also the first full year that the Office accepted passport applications for the U. S. 
Department of State which proved to be an excellent source of revenue for the Town. 



DEPARTMENT STATISTICS: 



Census 

In January 2002, the Town Census was mailed to 1 1 ,260 households. The Town's population 
at the completion of the census was 30,695. 



Elections/Voter Registration 

Elections in 2002 provided the following results: 



Election 


Date 


No. of Voters 


% 


of Voters 


Town Election 


March 26, 2002 


1,718 




9% 


Special Town Election 


June 11,2002 


7,819 




41% 


(Prop. 2V2 Override) 










State Primary 


September 17, 2002 


6,129 




33% 


State Election 


November 5, 2002 


13,738 




73% 



There were 1,603 new voter registrations filed in 2002. The year ended with 19,237 
registered voters in nine precincts as follows: 



Precinct 1: 


2,098 


Precinct 4: 


1,924 


Precinct 7: 


2,182 


Precinct 2: 


2,065 


Precinct 5 : 


2,124 


Precinct 8: 


2,332 


Precinct 3: 


2,178 


Precinct 6: 


2,128 


Precinct 9: 


2,206 



20 



Records/Licenses 





2000 


2001 


2002 


Births Recorded: 


330 


316 


312 


Marriages Recorded: 


187 


142 


162 


Deaths Recorded: 


277 


234 


281 


Dog Licenses Sold: 


2321 


2238 


2260 


Fishing & Hunting Licenses Sold: 


379 


424 


416 


Business Certificates Filed: 


115 


113 


130 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 


734 


438 


— 


Passport Applications 


— 


62* 


1361 



Beginning November 2001 



FEES COLLECTED: 





2000 


2001 


2002 


Marriage Licenses: 


2,855.00 


2,145.00 


2,415.00 


Certified Copies: 


11,311-50 


10,579.00 


11,542.00 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 


9,269.40 


4,376.00 


5,195.60 A 


Miscellaneous License Income: 


13,850.00 


13,195.00 


11,195.00 


Liquor Licenses Income: 


98,105.00 


104,750.00 


96,845.00 


Business Certificate Filings: 


2,880.00 


2,795.00 


3,220.00 


Miscellaneous Income: 


4,597.30 


2,036.35 


4,251.50 


Passport Fees: 


— 


930.00 


25,695.00 AA 


Dog Licenses: 


17,045.00 


17,928.00 


18,137.00 


Non-Criminal Violations: 


605.00 


1,240.00 


1,525.00 


Copies of Public Records: 


367.40 


400.65 


273.40 


Fishing & Hunting Licenses: 


10,343.55 * 


9,456.45 ** 9,303.25** 


TOTAL MONIES COLLECTED: 


$171,229.15 


$171,081.45 


$189,597.75 



** 



*** 



As of July 1 , 2002, all UCC filings are filed and processed by the Secretary of State's Office. 
Cities and towns will receive a decreasing percentage of these funds over a period of five 
years. 

November, 2001, became an acceptance agent on behalf of the Dept. of State for new 
passport applications. 

$10,170.75 to the State Div. of Fisheries & Wildlife - $172.80 retained by the Town. 

$9,299.75 to the State Div. of Fisheries & Wildlife - $156.70 retained by the Town. 

$9,148.00 to the State Div. of Fisheries & Wildlife - $155.25 retained by the Town. 



21 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 
BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the 
Town 's residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts State Building Code, 780 CMR; The Architectural Access Board Regulations, 521 
CMR; The Andover Zoning By-Law, Article VIII of the General By-Laws, Article 33 of the 
General Bylaws (Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings and Structures), Article XII of 
the General By-Laws (Ballardvale Historic District) and Article 37 of the General By-Laws 
(Chimneys), and all other applicable laws and regulations. The Building Division reviews all plans 
and specifications submitted for the issuance of building permits, issues the permits and performs 
all required inspections, after which certificates of occupancy are issued. The Building Division 
responds to all customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies and issues enforcement orders 
when they are indicated. The Building Division assists other Divisions of the Department of 
Community Development and Planning as well as the Andover Fire Prevention Office as needed, 
and attends various committee, commission and interdepartmental meetings when necessary. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



PERMIT TYPE 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


New Dwellings 


55 


58 


30 


36 


Additions/Alterations to Single 
Family Dwellings 


715 


719 


732 


827 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 


4 


3 


2 


2 


Additions/Alterations to Multi- 
Family Dwellings 


21 


43 


10 


2 


New Commercial & Industrial 
Buildings 


11 


6 


1 


4 


Additions/ Alterations to Commercial 
and Industrial Buildings 


128 


130 


96 


133 


Schools/Public Buildings 


36 


10 


8 


7 


Swimming Pools 


26 


35 


30 


34 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodburning 
Stoves, Raze Permits 


191 


173 


81 


55 


Certificates of Inspection 


21 


34 


29 


30 


Total Fees Collected 


$760,895 


$935,464 


$586,770 


$724,856 


Total Estimated Value 


$101,562,600 


$164,816,278 


$131,266,053 


$108,871,821 



22 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 

1999 2000 2001 2002 



Electrical Permits 


1,238 


1,279 


1,171 


1,030 


Fees Collected 


$109,699 


$120,502 


$66,927 


$56,730 


PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING 











All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conduced as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 



1999 2000 2001 2002 



Plumbing Permits 


786 


905 


814 


856 


Plumbing Fees Collected 


$41,648 


$47,029 


$34,260 


$34,038 


Gas Permits 


508 


747 


671 


695 


Gas Fees Collected 


$13,334 


$17,876 


$15,183 


$15,689 


Seals 






3 


2 


Seal Fees Collected 






$30 


$285 



23 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 



The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover 's natural resources and 
to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and 
the Andover Wetland Protection Bylaw. Additionally, the Commission acquires and manages land 
for conservation, passive recreation and watershed protection purposes. Approximately 1 ,768 acres 
of land are under the control and custody of the Commission. 



Conservation Commission Meetings 

Public Hearings & Public Meetings 

Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area Delineation 

Orders of Conditions Issued 

Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Conservation Restrictions Established 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Expenditures from Conservation Fund 



2000 



20 



219 



27 



21 



118 



28 



45 



21 







2001 



23 



310 



29 



15 



17 



102 



28 



37 



18 







2002 



22 



240 



19 



66 



20 



22 



15 







$4,179 $11,126.25 $6,464.84 
$40,000 $9,794 



24 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The 
Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with 
State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily 
responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes 
primary responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper land 
use, specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, wetland 
pollution, water quality protection). The Director designs programs and implements policies as 
proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board of 
Health consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year 
terms. 



ACTIVITY REPORT 





2000 


2001 


2002 


Board of Health Meetings 


12 


12 


12 


Plan Reviews 


147 


159 


175 


Restaurant Inspections 


224 


142 


85 


Environmental/Sanitary Code Inspections 




175 


210 


Complaints & Investigations 


185 


494 


224 


Administrative Hearings 


7 


4 


3 


Court Actions 


5 


2 


1 


Fees Collected 


$80,110 


$96,052 


$84,145 


CLINIC REPORT 








2000 


2001 


2002 


Outreach Clinics 


21 


19 


21 


Attendance 


215 


211 


314 


Senior Center Clinics 


51 


50 


51 


Office Visits 


132 


238 


240 


Home Visits 


12 


37 


20 


Recreational Camps for Children-clinical inspection 




10 


30 


Influenza Immunization 


1163* 


1450 


1200 


Attendance 


831 


715 


758 


Pneumonia Immunization 


76 


59 


30 



*Due to vaccine shortage and delay in distribution 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 



9 
98 



9 

82 



5* 

57 



* New machine purchased with Grant from the Andover Home for Aged People 



25 



2000* 



2001 = 



2002* 



Mantoux Tuberculin testing Attendance 
Positive Reactor Follow Up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appointments & Follow Up 
* Due to revised DPH guidelines on testing 



HEPATITIS B IMMUNIZATION CLINICS - HEPATITIS B VACCINE 

2000 



Doherty Middle School 
West Middle School 
Andover High School 
TOTAL 

* Hepatitis B Program Completed 

MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE IMMUNIZATION CLINICS 



86 


25 


8 


6 


9 


13 


22 


14 


19 



2001 



2002* 



185 


114 


35 


127 


63 


23 


57 


13 


7 


369 


190 


65 



2002 



Andover High School 
Summer Clinics 
TOTAL 



70 
25 
95 



NON-COMMUNICABLE REPORTABLE DISEASES 



2000 



2001 



2002 



Other Mycobacterium 

*A typical Mycobacteria Abcessus 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Animal Bites 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

Cyclospora 

E.coli0157.H7 

Giardia 

Hepatitis A 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Lyme Disease 

Pertussis 

Measles (Rubeola) 

Meningitis (Bacterial) 

Meningitis (Viral) 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Strep Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Legionella 

Yersinia Entercolitica 

Malaria 



2000 



2001 



2002 



33 


9 


22 


5 


4 


22 


5 


5 


7 











1 


1 


7 


1 


2 


4 


2 


1 





8 


5 


7 


9 


2 


9 


5 


5 


14 


2 


1 


1 














1 


1 





1 


2 


8 


5 


6 





1 











2 





1 











1 








2 



26 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 

Under the authority of the Andover Board of Health and funded by the Massachusetts 
Tobacco Control Program, the Healthy Communities Tobacco Program enforces the Town's local 
laws that prohibit the sale of tobacco products to minors. Healthy Communities (which also serves 
the communities of Dracut, Middleton, Methuen, North Andover, North Reading, Reading, 
Stoneham and Topsfield) is also charged with enforcing the Town of Andover' s ban on smoking in 
restaurants and certain other enclosed public places. 



The Need For A Tobacco Control Program 

Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in Massachusetts, accounting for close to 
9,300 deaths annually. The cost of tobacco is also financially devastating. Health care costs of 
caring for people with smoking related illnesses surpass $2.7 billion per year. 



Smoking Rates 

Approximately 900,000 adults smoke in Massachusetts. The adult smoking rate fell from 
22.6% to 18.1% from 1993 to 2001. This translates into an estimated reduction of 2 19,000 smokers. 



Smoking by Pregnant Women 

Smoking by pregnant women in Massachusetts declined from 1 7% in 1993 to 10% in 2000. 
Massachusetts leads all states in the decline of women who smoke during pregnancy. 



Youth Smoking 

From the year 1995 to 2001, youth smoking declined from 36% to 26% in Massachusetts, 
while falling more slowly in the country. A second study in 2002 documents a continued decline in 
youth smoking to 20.7%. 



Illegal Sales To Minors 

Andover has long taken the lead in establishing strict local laws that prohibit the sale of 
tobacco to minors. The Town of Andover's bylaws provide for $100, $200 and $300 fines for first, 
second and third violations of those laws respectively. Also, the Board of Health has exercised its 
power to suspend retailers' permits to sell tobacco for repeated violations. 

Despite recent strides to curb illegal sales to youth under the age of 18, the problem of sales 
to minors still exists. Establishments that sell tobacco products are inspected by Healthy 



27 



Communities using compliance checks, in which youth, under the supervision of a tobacco control 
official, attempt to buy tobacco products. Overall in Massachusetts, illegal sales to minors have 
fallen from a sales rate of 39% in 1994 to just 10% in 2001. 

However, there are some troubling developments. While statewide statistics are unavailable 
for the year 2002, local numbers show that the rate at which sales are made to minors may be on the 
rise. In Andover, during fiscal year 2002 (spanning from July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002), 17% of all 
compliance checks on establishments resulted in an illegal tobacco sale to a minor. This is up from 
the 9% sales rate in fiscal year 2001 . Also, recent data on compliance checks during the first half of 
fiscal year 2003 shows that in three communities served by Healthy Communities', sales rates were 
at least 40%. A prevalent explanation for why these sales rates may be on the increase is the 
perception that recent budget cuts for tobacco control programs have resulted in the elimination of 
enforcement. 

Despite funding cutbacks, Healthy Communities Tobacco Control Program views 
enforcement of its tobacco youth access laws as its number one priority. The rationale for this 
prioritization is fact that the vast majority those adults who currently smoke started smoking as 
minors. Healthy Communities knows that preventing youth access to tobacco goes a long way 
toward meeting its goal to achieve a smoke-free generation. 



Call Us If You Suspect Violations Of Tobacco Control Laws 

Healthy Communities, along with the Andover Board of Health, urges all residents to call the 
program at 978-749-8999 to report any violations of local laws prohibiting tobacco sales to minors. 
Residents are also invited to report any problems with secondhand tobacco in enclosed public places. 



28 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations of 
the Master Plan. 

Throughout 2002 the Planning Division continued its efforts toward downtown 
improvements and work on major transportation system projects. Working with the Main Street 
Committee, the Division helped bring the S2.5 million Main Street plan to 75% completion. Work 
continued on critical transportation projects such as the River Road Bridge (finally finished by the 
end of the year), Dascomb Road corridor improvements near the Tewksbury line and new traffic 
signals at Lovejoy Road; the Burtt Road extension project, and a new full-access interchange on 1-93 
in Lowell Junction. Staff also participated in numerous advisory committee meetings throughout the 
year on the 1-93 Corridor Study in Andover and Methuen. 

The Division staff continued to work with the GIS Coordinator on the development of a 
sophisticated Geographic Information System (GIS) which will provide the Town with a 
significantly enhanced record keeping and retrieval system for our land use and infrastructure data. 

The year 2002 saw a re-emergence of comprehensive permit applications for affordable 
housing developments. Four applications were filed during the year resulting in increased 
professional assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals and Housing Partnership Committee. Four 
additional projects were waiting to be filed. Staff worked closely with the Housing Partnership 
Committee in developing two new housing by-laws and a new Historic Preservation by-law. The 
Division was successful in obtaining E0418 Housing Certification from the State. The Division 
worked closely with the Vision 2 1 Committee and secured $30,000 in funding to help create a Vision 
Statement for the Town as well as an update of several sections of the 1992 Master Plan. 

Development activities in the Town's industrial areas which had experienced increases in the 
two previous years leveled off in 2002, however, still continued at a steady pace. Single-family 
residential development slowed during the year although there was an increase in proposals for new 
multi-family development. 

1999 2000 2001 2002 



Planning Board Meetings 


22 


26 


24 


20 


Public Hearings Held 


96 


57 


60 


55 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


10 


8 


9 


4 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


7 


6 


8 


2 


ANR Plans 


235 


26 


25 


17 


Site Plan Reviews 


1 


6 


9 


15 


Special Permits issued 


28 


14 


16 


10 


Lot Releases and Clearance 


80 


57 


30 


36 


Certificates Issued 










Warrant Articles Reported 


37 


41 


11 


24 


Street Acceptances 


2 


9 


6 


6 


Subdivision Guarantees 


$263,053 


.$189,000 


$166,405 


$203,600 


Revenues Generated 


$135,768 


$70,276 


$60,237 


$24,150 



29 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial 
Hall at the Memorial Library, Elm Square. The Board of Selectmen appoints five regular 
members and four associate members. The public hearings by the Board are the result of 
petitions in the following areas: 

A variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

A special permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 

Administrative official; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate-income housing within the Town 

(Comprehensive Permit). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations conducts public 
hearings. Following the hearings, Board members, when deemed necessary, view each property 
in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented at the 
hearing and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk and 
the Registry of Deeds. 





1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Number of Regular Meetings 


12 


13 


35 


22 


Deliberation Meetings 


14 


15 


23 


27 


Petitions Filed 


115/122* 


106/119* 


71 


Q-7** 


Petitions Granted 


92 


99 


50 


67 


Petitions Denied 


17 


10 


11 


13 


Petitions Withdrawn/Dismissed or Continued 


13 


10 


25 


18 
(8 cont.) 


Fees Collected 


$12,832 


$21,286 


$24,919 


$29,830** 



* 
** 



Some petitions contained requests for both variances and special permits. 
75 petitions were filed and heard in 2002. 12 were filed in 2001 and heard in Jan. 2002. 
The fees collected for these were not included in the total. 10 were filed in 2002 and 
heard in Jan. 2003. These fees were included in the total. 



30 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



r 



SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



f 


SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 


\ 


850 
830 
810 
790 
770 
750 
730 
710 


. .. . ._ 




/ 




/ 




/ 




/ 




/ 




^——S 




^ — 


690 


^"^ 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 




V 








PERMIT FEES 



$1,000,000 
$950,000 
$900,000 
$850,000 
$800,000 
$750,000 
$700,000 
$650,000 
$600,000 
$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



31 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING STATISTICS 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



30 
25 

20 
15 
10 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 





.»» 


/-- 


" •>. 








jr 








v. 

>- - 
















a. 


^ 















"a 




m 










QL^ 


-j_^ 






W^ 


--j_J5l- 


■ - 




■"*- 




- 






"Si 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



-♦ Preliminary Subdivision - - 

-A- - ANR Plans 



- Definitive Subdivision 
Site Plan Reviews 



120 
110 
100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

SURVEILLANCE 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
TOTAL CLINIC ATTENDANCE 




1998 



1999 



2000 2001 



2002 



32 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to protect the lives and property of the 
citizens of Andover as well as the people who work in and visit our Community. 

To achieve its mission, the Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or fire 
related activities through inspections, training, and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



2000 



2001 



2002 



TOTAL INCIDENTS: 



9130 



9791 



9807 



Fires 


420 


420 


552 


Rescues 


21 


39 


95 


Miscellaneous Alarms 


528 


450 


554 


Accidental Alarms 


180 


106 


171 


Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 


20 


47 


14 


False Alarms 


50 


207 


163 


Ambulance Calls 


2770 


2753 


3038 


Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 


61 


53 


40 


Fire Prevention Activities 


2343 


2224 


2030 


Service Calls 


2265 


2958 


2597 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


283 


321 


403 


Training 


144 


177 


126 


Co-Activation 


45 


36 


24 


PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED: 


1925 


1990 


1667 


Smoke Detectors 


725 


602 


679 


Report Copies 


72 


85 


64 


Blasting Permits 


7 


16 


76 


Cutting/Welding Permits 


15 


13 


21 


Dumpster Permits 


58 


80 


100 


Fireworks Display Permits 


1 


1 


1 


Gunpowder Storage Permits 





1 





Liquid Gas Storage Permits 


57 


63 


71 


Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 


6 


5 


6 


Miscellaneous Permits 


2 


2 


3 


Open Air Burning Permits 


571 


612 


237* 


Oil Burner Install Permits 


112 


138 


104 


Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 


28 


69 


35 


Special Suppression System Permits 


6 


10 


10 



33 



2000 



2001 



2002 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED (Cont.) : 

Sprinkler Install Permits 
Underground Tank Re-certification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



62 


73 


45 





9 


10 


57 


67 


49 


9 








137 


144 


156 



FEES COLLECTED: 

Ambulance Fees: 
Permits/Licenses: 
Fire Alarm Box Fees 



$533,572 
$ 33,655 
$ 20,550 



$626,211 
$ 30,145 
$ 21,300 



$564,757 
$ 28,004* 
$ 30,050 



* Open Air Burning permits were suspended due to dry weather. 
PERSONNEL: 72.8 



72.8 



74 



FACILITIES: 



APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT 



Fire Administration, 32 North Main Street 

Fire Prevention Office, Town Offices 

Central Station 

(Temporarily located at Spring Grove Cemetery 



1 Sedan 

2 Sedans 

2 Ambulances (1 Reserve) 

1 Ladder Truck (In Storage) 

2 Pumpers ( 1 In Storage) 
2 Boats 

1 Brush Truck 

1 Pumper 

1 Fire Alarm Truck 

1 Ladder Tower 

1 Brush Truck 

1 Boat 

1 Lighting Unit 



Ballardvale Station, Clark Road & Andover Street 1 Pumper 

1 Boat 
1 Command Vehicle 



West Station, Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



34 



FIRE STATISTICS 



FIRE CALLS 



600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 







1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 

□ Andover ■ Mutual Aid 



AMBULANCE TRANSPORTS 



3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 

□ ANDOVER ■ MUTUAL 



PERMITS & LICENSES ISSUED 



2,000 

1,500 

1,000 

500 





■ 111- 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



□ SMOKE BOPEN □ MASTER DDUMP 



150 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



35 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of life 
in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public safety 
and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods are 
maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes integrity, 
honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment that values 
differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department encourages citizen 
input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between the community and 
the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality of life for everyone 
within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 32,050 incidents in 2002. There were 449 arrests, 1 murder, 6 
rapes, 422 larcenies and 51 burglaries. 

The Town experienced a 13% decrease in larceny during the year, however, stolen motor 
vehicles and bicycles both saw an increase, 26% and 41%, respectively. Vandalism in 2002 
decreased 2 1 % from the previous year. 

The Department issued 6482 motor vehicle citations during the year which is down 20% 
from the previous year. There were 1307 motor vehicle accidents handled by the Department - a 
12%o increase from the previous year. There was a 500% increase in motor vehicle fatalies, largely 
due to an increase in highway fatalities. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, agencies and 
the community throughout the year. The Sub-Stations, located in Brookside Estates and on 
Grandview Terrace, continued to allow the Department to form a partnership with the residents of 
Brookside Estates, the Andover Housing Authority and the Youth Services Department through the 
Youth Horizon Grant Program. 

The Department also participated in numerous events including the Christmas and Memorial 
Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Bazaar Days, the Feaster Five Road 
Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held during the year. 



36 



RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as well as to the entire 
community. 

The Police Department received more than $ 1 50,500 in new grant money during 2002. These 
grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel and other 
resources. A $15,000 grant for the DARE program allowed the Department to assign a specially- 
trained officer to the schools to teach students about the dangers of drugs and alcohol. This program 
will be discontinued for FY-2004 due to funding cuts. Equipment grants allowed the Department to 
provide car safety seats and bicycle helmets to those who would otherwise not be able to afford such 
safety items. Equipment for a fingerprint workstation, additional defibrillators, specialized weapons 
and protective gear were also purchased with the help of grant money. 

The Court Section processed a total of 449 arrests. This included tracking all Police 
Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' appearances in court. In 
addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other Town Departments such as the 
Health Division, Building Division, etc. 



DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow up of investigations conducted by the 
agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This Unit was created in 
response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active role in 
combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. In addition, two officers were trained in technical 
services such as fingerprint identification techniques and crime scene processing and four officers 
were trained in rape investigation. The Division also has one investigator assigned as a Juvenile 
Officer. He works closely with the schools and courts in processing Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators of 
numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated one murder, 5 1 burglaries, six rapes and 
422 larcenies. The Police Department experienced a large increase in the number of reported rapes 
and sexual assaults during the year. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. They recognize this new aspect of 
Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of the 
Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 



37 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 941 calls for service in 2002. He responded to 326 dog 
complaints and impounded 76 dogs and 6 cats. He also removed 220 deceased animals. In addition 
to these removed animals, there were 33 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in Town. 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Emergency Management Division is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA). It includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the regional Local Emergency Planning 
Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any hazardous 
materials incident. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They are a 
very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a resource. 



38 



POLICE STATISTICS 



900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



ARRESTS 



$j SB i 

zzzz z: ■ 



1998 



1999 



2000 



□ Adult 



2001 



I Juvenile 



2002 



ASSAULTS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 




f 

100 

90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 

t 


BREAKING & ENTERING 




\ 


^ 


/ \ 


\ 


\ 


^^ 




1998 1999 2000 2001 


2002 



39 



POLICE STATISTICS 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 

70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



-♦ — Motor Vehicles 



* - - Bicycles 



DOMESTIC ABUSE 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



VANDALISM 




1998 



1999 2000 2001 2002 



40 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available a broad range of library 
materials, to provide up-to-date and accurate information, to offer services and programs 
desired by the community of Andover, to act as the most convenient point of access for the 
needed materials and information, to actively seek to make community members and 
organizations aware of library resources and services, and to utilize technology and the Internet 
to the fullest possible extent in carrying out this mission. 



The Library is pleased to report the following achievements in 2002: 

Became the first library in New England to offer audiobooks on MP3 devices. Check it out 
at http://www.mhl.org/collections/eaudio/ . 

Became the first public library in Massachusetts to implement the Pharos signup system to 
automate PC signups to insure that our public computers are shared equitably. See 
http://www.mhl.org/info/faqs/pharosfaqs.htm . 

After opening the new Young Adult area for middle and high school age students, the 
Library wired the tables in what is now called the Teen-Z Room for data and power and the 
room is full of kids each day and evening. In addition, the Young Adult Department offers 
six laptop computers with network cables for students to use in the Young Adult Room. 

Added more than 900 new books on technology to its collection. 

• Music for Tots - The Library's Hall became a meeting place for young mothers, babies and 
strollers during the Music for Tots music and movement program for birth through thirty-six 
months. This program was wildly popular due to the appeal of the presenter and the fact that 
we have not offered any programs for this age group before. Four sessions were held in 
March and then another four in November. The Friends of Memorial Hall Library sponsored 
these programs and because of their popularity they will be offered again in 2003. 

The Children's Library began an evening book discussion group for older readers ages 8 to 
1 1 . The readings focused on books and activities related to overcoming obstacles. 

The 24/7 Reference Service that allows patrons to chat with a "live" librarian continued to 
see increased usage. The service won a Certificate of Achievement in Innovation from the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association for the program. Also, two of the Reference Librarians 
were invited to speak on digital reference at the American Library Association Conference in 
Atlanta and the Virtual Reference Desk Conference in Chicago. 

The number of electronic databases with remote access increases. Check them out at 
www.mhl.org . 



41 



"Libraries will get you through times with no money better than money will get you 
through times with no libraries" is a saying that has been said through other hard times and it is 
just as true today. The important role that the library plays in people's lives as a provider of 
materials, information and services becomes even more pronounced during times of economic 
downturn. Even though State budget cuts forced Memorial Hall Library to cut both staff and 
materials in September 2002, use of the Library continued to increase. Overall circulation of 
library materials was at an all time high in 2002 with 531,790 items being checked out. Another 
45,764 people came to the Library just to use the computers. The Library's web page was hit 
more than 2 J4 million times over the past year by people searching for information. 

In addition to being used for the resources it offers, Memorial Hall Library continued to 
operate at the center of the community as a source of culture and connectedness. Whether it was 
through the very full series of Friends-sponsored programs of music, literature and culture or 
through the Library's active role in this year's visit by a group of visitors from Andover, 
England, the Library continued to operate, as it has for the last 130 years, at the heart and center 
of Andover. 

Andover' s love for their Library is shown through the many ways they offer their time 
and support. The dedication of the volunteers who contribute their time, effort and money made 
the Library a better place in 2002. Those volunteers include the Library Trustees, the Friends of 
Memorial Hall Library, the Senior Volunteers and students who are completing their community 
service requirements. Thank you to everyone who helped to make this year a success! 



42 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 2002 STATISTICS 



CIRCULATION: 



Adult Books & Periodicals 
Children ' s Books & Periodicals 

Total Books & Periodicals 

Adult Non-Print 
Children ' s Non-Print 

Total Non-Print 

Total Items Circulated 

Searches Retrieved On-line 

Total Items Provided 



1999 

202,719 
176.577 

379,296 



2000 

195,726 
165.920 

361,646 



2001 

183,624 
166.667 

350,291 



2002 

188,855 
168,003 

356,858 



106,052 


118,701 


127,478 


134,412 


31,273 


34,913 


36.258 


40,520 


137,325 


153,614 


163,836 


174,932 


516,621 


515,260 


514,127 


531,790 


31,181 


36,629 


37,920 


36,204 


547,802 


551,889 


552,047 


567,994 



OTHER STATISTICS: 



Reference Questions 




67,783 


60,000 


54,860 


53,992 


PC & Internet Sessions 




19,368 


30,000 


38,749 


45,764 


Programs 




546 


382 


284 


342 


Program Attendance 




20,078 


13,616 


9,060 


14,941 


Meeting Room Use 




475 


620 


397 


400 


Reserves Placed 




9,912 


10,022 


11,890 


14,107 


Interhbrary Loan Requests 


Received 


29,604 


29,576 


32,143 


37,895 


Interlibrary Loan Requests 


Filled 


19,303 


18,788 


15,840 


21,009 


Volunteer Hours 




2,523 


4,996 


4,714 


13,229 


Visitors to Library 




359,000* 


386,000* 


411,600* 


388,921* 



* Based on sample counts during the year 



43 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



400,000 



300,000 



200,000 



100,000 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 



Mill 



1998 1999 
□ Adult 



2000 



2001 2002 

I Children 



REFERENCE QUESTIONS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



f 


NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 


\ 


200,000 


— • ■ 




175,000 




»'% 






150,000 




BE 






125,000 




■ ■ ■ 




— 






— 






100,000 



















- 




75,000 


- 


























50,000 


- 




















— 




25,000 


























1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 




L 


□ Adult B Children 
^ 



PC & INTERNET USE 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



44 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide responsive and cost 
effective maintenance services to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle 
maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas within their responsibility. 



The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
services to all Town and School buildings (over 1.3 million sq. ft), parks and grounds, cemetery, 
forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions and the Town House (Old Town Hall). 

Managing the Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services to all Town buildings. 

Traffic Lights. 

Trash pickup at all Town and School buildings. 

Town-owned street lighting. 

Town switchboard operations. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Plant and Facilities Department is managed by a Director who is supported by four 
Superintendents, an Administrative Assistant, Construction Project Manager (temporary 
employee), Work Control Center Coordinator, Accounts Payable Clerk, Budget Analyst, part- 
time Telephone Operator/Receptionists and a diverse group of skilled and semi-skilled 
maintenance trades persons, vehicle mechanics, grounds and tree workers and custodians. 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Major Capital Projects: 

New Elementary/Middle School - The new schools opened on September 5, 2002 with the 

exception of the Auditorium which was completed by year-end. Punch list and close out 

documents are in process. Meetings are in progess with the general contractor to try and 

resolve Town and general contractor claims and to close out the project. 

Public Safety Center - Construction contract signed September 2000. Phase I construction 

(Police Station) completed and occupied in August 2002 (punch list ongoing). Phase II 

(Fire Station) started in September 2002. Progress on the site work is behind schedule and 

further delays by the general contractor are anticipated. The Town's estimated completion 

date is May, 2004 vs. the contract completion date of September/October 2002. 

West Elementary School Asbestos Remediation/Renovation - Phase I (Cafeteria area) 



45 



completed. Design work and bid package for Phase II & III complete. Construction planned 
for the Summers of 2003 & 2004. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings, which total in excess of 1.3 
million square feet. The two superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of 
Town and School capital improvement projects. Additionally, they provide custodial services to 
Town buildings, mail delivery to all buildings, maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street 
light poles. 

During 2002 these two divisions completed 3,791 work orders. 

2000 2001 2002 

Town 1,400 1,407 1,285 

School 3,016 2,756 2,506 

Total 4,416 4,163 3,791* 

* Does not include 345 work orders that were used to track Town and School capital 
projects including support to the new schools and the Public Safety Center project. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

On-going Town yard repairs, new roof forestry/sewer buildings. 

New playground equipment Penguin Park. 

Numerous handicap-related projects (door hardware, new entrance doors etc.). 

Remodeled the women's bathroom at the Town offices and the men's bathroom at the High 

School. 

New floor tile and asbestos tile remediation in seven classrooms at the Doherty Middle 

School. 

New carpeting at the West Elementary School auditorium & main offices and the Hart Room 

at the West Middle School. 

Replaced a large section of main sewer line at the West Middle School. 

Extensive support was given to the High Plain Elementary School and Wood Hill Middle 

School project (lock systems installed etc.). 

New gym floor was installed, roof repairs were made and tower bridge Bancroft School was 

rebuilt. 

New roof was installed at the Sanborn School modular units (covered by warranty). 

Eight windows were replaced at the Shawsheen School. The Town House windows were 

recaulked/repainted. 

Extensive support was given at the new Police Station (lock systems installed etc). 

Replaced bathroom partitions (15 stalls in four bathrooms) at the West Middle School. 

Eliminated interior structural columns at the Red Spring Road building to improve 



46 



utilization. 

Painting projects were completed at the School and Town buildings. 

Secured the 16 Haverhill Street building (repairs, lock sets etc.) 

MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed concrete cap and sealing in all basement earthen areas at the Doherty Middle 

School. 

Energy management. 

Energy management controls installed in all building air handlers and univents plus give new 

A/C units were installed in the main office area at the Doherty Middle School. 

Doherty Middle School - installed energy efficient lighting in the cafeteria and gym areas, 

installed new motion sensors in all classrooms which were subsidized by the Mass. Electric 

Energy Program. 

Replaced the building rooftop exhaust fans at the West Elementary School and Doherty 

Middle School. 

West Elementary School boiler room systems were upgraded - boiler fee unit, new efficient 

domestic hot water system, new air compressor and boiler make-up air unit. 

Installed four new unit ventilators in the West Elementary School cafeteria. 

Installed new HVAC system in the West Middle School Media Center plus eight new PTAX 

air conditioning units in the Media Center rooms and a new energy efficient lighting system 

in the Media Center that was subsidized by Mass Electric. 

Installed new energy management system/controls at the Town House. 

Replaced two main boiler sections at the West Middle School. 

Completed asbestos remediation projects at the Doherty Middle School, Shawsheen School 

and West Elementary School and school asbestos inspections. 

A new fire alarm system was installed in the School Administration areas. Updated fire 

alarm system was completed at the West Elementary School. 

Shawsheen School - completed the first phase of converting the old steam heating system to 

a modern hot water system (new pumps, heat exchanger and main piping). Rebuilt and 

reactivated the building, make up air system. 

Installed a sink in the Shawsheen School's kindergarten classroom. 

Provided extensive support to the start up of the new elementary and middle schools and 

Police Station. 

PARKS AND GROUNDS, CEMETERY & FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one superintendent, 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, snow removal and moving 
heavy items such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area and building and 
repairing park benches and tables. During 2002 these divisions completed 130 work orders (92 
- Town and 38 - Schools) totaling $752,784.00 (labor and materials). 



47 



PARKS DIVISION 

This division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1.4 million square feet 
of lawn areas. Ballfields and lawns are located on all School grounds and other Town property 
such as Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower Shawsheen, the Bowling 
Green, parks, playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other parcels throughout the 
Town. Ballfields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf 
maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, over-seeding, liming fertilizing and weed 
and insects control. Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using 
approved pesticides and application methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs 
and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town buildings. 

PARKS & GROUNDS ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Installation of underground irrigation systems at the High School upper plateau, Doherty 

Middle School and West Middle School fields. 

Rebuilt the Deyermond soccer field. 

Overseeding and aeration of several athletic fields. 

Extensive support was given to the new High Plain Elementary School and Wood Hill 

Middle School site. 

Built retaining wall/materials storage area adjacent to Buxton Court Parks building. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. 
The cemetery contains approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 
2002, there were 62 burials and 62 grave sites sold. Total revenue received was $80,190. 
Cemetery operations and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of 
shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, town wide snow removal, and other tasks including grounds 
maintenance in Recreation Park and special projects at other Town facilities. 

CEMETERY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Cemetery expansion program created over 2,000 new grave sites. 

Cemetery operations were compressed back temporarily into the old building to 

accommodate the move of the Central Fire Department operations during Phase II of the 

construction of new Fire Station. 

Completed the paving of sections of Cemetery roadways. 

Assumed the care of the historic Jenkins Cemetery. An Eagle Scout project performed many 

of the improvements. 

Installed new signage. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. The 
majority of their time is spent pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of 



48 



undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved 
visibility. The Forestry Division also mows roadsides throughout the Town and maintains the 
Bald Hill compost site. 

FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 



Received the designation of "Tree City USA" for the third consecutive year and a growth 

award from the National Arbor Day Foundation. 

Produced 2,500 yards of screened compost at Bald Hill for use by the Town and its residents. 

Responded to 141 requests for tree work by Town residents. 

Planted 34 new street trees. 

3,000 cubic yards of tree debris and stumps were collected and ground up at the old land fill. 

Managed the installation of holiday lighting on Main Street and at the Town Offices. 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent who also is 
responsible for purchasing and materials management for all Plant and Facilities maintenance 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of 
equipment including Fire apparatus, Police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant 
and Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, other support vehicles, Town/School emergency 
generators and coordinates the purchasing for all new vehicles. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 145 Town vehicles and major pieces 

of equipment, 17 School and Town buildings' emergency generators and 36 smaller pieces of 

equipment. 1,170 work orders were completed. 

Provided administrative support to Town departments for vehicle purchases. 

Supported snow removal operations, maintaining, installation and removal of DPW sander 

units. 

Maintained and repaired all Town Fire apparatus as well as assisting with federally-mandated 

inspections of the Fire Department's ladder trucks' hydraulic and pump systems. 

The vehicle and equipment fuel consumption for all Town departments during 2002 is as 
follows: 







GALLONS 






FY2000 


FY2001 


FY2002 


Gasoline 


81,250 


91,968 


91,278 


Diesel 


36,134 


51,829 


36,137 


Total 


117,384 


143,797 


127,415 



49 



MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION 

The Municipal Buildings Division is responsible for scheduling and renting School 
facilities during the evening, weekends and holidays as well as scheduling and renting School 
and Town athletic fields, Recreation Park and the Town House function facility on Main Street. 

One of the division's major accomplishments of the past year was the assistance with the 
Town Manager's newly formed Athletic Fields Working Group. The collaboration of the Town 
Manager, members of the Plant and Facilities Department and representatives of the Town's 
sports leagues has resulted in an on-going partnership that has increased and improved the 
communication between the sports groups that utilize the Town's fields and the divisions that 
schedule and maintain the fields. On-going objectives include creating and implementing 
strategies to improve the condition of existing fields as well as the creation of new fields. 

Schools 

The total number of school rentals and uses during 2002 was 9,312 - a 53 % increase over 
the 2001 numbers. Overall, gymnasium spaces continue to comprise the majority of the rental 
and scheduling contracts. Cafeteria and auditorium contracts account for the second and third 
greatest number of uses. 

The largest increases were seen in the number of after-school programs run by the School 
Department at the elementary level, the number of private youth sports programs and Town-run 
DCS and AYS programs. Figures below do not include the rentals or uses of the Andover High 
School athletic fields, gymnasium, Field House or Collins Center as they are all scheduled 
through the School Administration Offices. 

2000 2001 2002 

Total Number of Scheduled Rentals/Uses 
Community Services & Youth Services 
Private Rentals: Youth Leagues/Scouting Groups 
School & PTO-Sponsored Events 

Fields 

School and Town playing fields continued to be rented to capacity in 2002 due to the 
growing number of participants in local youth and sports leagues and the growth of additional 
Andover High School and Youth Services boys and girls Lacrosse teams. 

The number of scheduled field rentals and uses in 2002 remained relatively unchanged 
compared to 2001. Youth sports organizations such as the Andover Soccer Association and 
Andover Little League continue to schedule the majority of field spaces with scheduling for 
Town-sponsored recreation programs, Andover Junior Football, Andover Girls Softball League 
and the Andover adult sports leagues making up the remainder of the scheduled uses. Due to the 



50 



5,570 


6,083 


9,312 


43% 


37% 


36% 


36% 


40% 


41 % 


21% 


23%o 


23% 



great demand for practice and game space by local youth leagues, less than one percent of the 
total number of rentals was to private groups or business organizations. 

The expansion of High School, DCS and AYS programs continues to draw more 
participants each year many of whom play more than one outdoor sport each season. This has 
added to the existing scheduling constraints on Town and School fields that are booked to 
maximum capacity Monday through Saturday each week during each sport season. 



Total Number of Scheduled Rentals/Uses 
Youth Leagues 

DCS/Youth Services & AHS Athletics 
Adult Leagues/Private Rentals 



2000 



2001 



2002 



2,906 


3,695 


3,648 


75% 


72% 


70% 


21% 


24% 


26% 


4% 


4% 


4% 



Recreation Park 

Recreation Park is available for private rentals on weekends from April to October. 
During the Spring, Summer and early Fall weekdays the Park's softball field and tennis courts 
are scheduled for DCS tennis classes, recreational programs as well as a co-ed softball league. 
The total number of scheduled uses in 2002 was 307 which is just seven more uses than in 2001. 
The vast majority of the private rentals were to local residents and non-profit organizations. 



2000 



2001 



2002 



Total Number of Scheduled Rentals/Uses 


298 


300 


307 


DCS 


175 


160 


184 


Youth Leagues 


58 


75 


75 


Private Rentals 


65 


65 


48 


Old Town Hall 









The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available to municipal/school 
groups, residents and non-residents for special events since February 1990. The total number of 
uses/rentals in 2002 was 190 which was a 70 % increase over the 2001 numbers. This was due to 
the large increase of the Town's Senior Center and DCS programs held at the Town House 
during weekdays. 



2000 



2001 



2002 



Municipal/School events 

Residents 

Non-Residents 



108 


54 


122 


48 


54 


64 


14 


4 


4 



51 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



FIELD RENTALS 




1998 1999 



2000 



2001 2002 



9,500 
9,000 
8,500 
8,000 
7,500 
7,000 
6,500 
6,000 
5,500 
5,000 



SCHOOL BUILDING 
USE PERMITS 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



r 


■ ■■■ ■> 


7 C.C\C\ 


WORK ORDERS 


j,DUU 




1 


3,000 
2,500 






^^ M ~~ ^"-^ 


i ■_ ■ 

1 


2,000 
1,500 
1,000 




♦"r"- 




tc 




^nn 




i 


DUU 

1998 


1999 2000 2001 2002 
■ t\ \c\r\\ -a \/n \\c\ r 




1 UVVI' 


■ oU IUUL M V tl HULL 



GRAVE SITES 




1998 1999 2000 2001 



2002 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 



ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and 
bids, performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: 
sidewalk reconstruction on Walnut Street and School Street; construction of new sidewalks on 
Chestnut Street (Upland Road to Highland Road), Forest Hill Drive (River Road to Cross Street), 
Cross Street (Forest Hill Drive to High Plain Road) and High Plain Road (Pendant Court to High 
Meadow Lane); the completion of road construction and repairs of sewers and storm drains on 
Smithshire Estates Extension and drainage construction at seven various locations. The division 
also performed field surveys and designs to prepare for upcoming construction projects such as: 
sidewalk construction on Salem Street from Prospect Road to Rte. 125 and water main 
construction on Lewis Street, Buxton Court and Brady Loop. 

The Engineering staff also assisted and coordinated with consultants, contractors and 
residents during the design and construction of the sewer extensions for the Contracts No. 1 & 2 
of the South Main Street/Ballardvale Road Areas, Rogers Brook Area and the Forest Hills 
Drive/Cross Street Area. Various duties performed included utility markouts, inspections and 
resolving complaints. Staff members also assisted and coordinated with consultants on the 
design of other projects such as the Main Street Corridor Improvements; repairs to the Andover 
Street Bridge; and Traffic Signals at Dascomb Road/Lovejoy Road. Work was also initiated 
with the Town's consultant in developing a Stormwater Management Program to meet 
requirements of the new EPA Phase II Stormwater Regulations. 

Work was also performed to coordinate the development of the Town's GIS system with 
the contractor; install software, review preliminary and final data, checkplots and database 
design and updating of the parcel maps for the Town Assessor and printed the necessary copies 
for other Town Departments. 

Planning and estimating for the resurfacing of fourteen Town streets was prepared this 
year while assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work performed on 
thirteen of these streets. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the 
Planning Board; checked for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of 
proposed roads and utilities. All roads and utilities in new subdivisions and site developments 
such as Jordyn Lane, Black Horse Lane, Cassimere Street and numerous other sites were 
inspected and tested to insure compliance with Town construction standards. Performance Bond 
amounts were also calculated as requested by the Planning Board. 



53 



Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Bay State Gas Company, Verizon, Mass Electric, AT&T Broadband and other private 
contractors were issued through this division and the necessary utility markouts and inspections 
were carried out; notably including sidewalk reconstruction on Haverhill Street by Bay State Gas 
contractors. 

The Engineering Division also provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 





1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Storm Drain Design & Construction 
(ft.) 


3,870 


1,180 


2,378 


2,283 


448 


Sewer Main Design & Construction 
(ft.) 


2,490 


1,900 


1,660 


37,600 


50 


Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 


3,970 


8,500 


6,140 


8,623 


15,700 


Water Main Design & Construction 
(ft.) 


1,950 


775 





4,188 





Guardrail Replaced/installed (ft.) 


19,200 














Streets Resurfaced (miles) 


16.3 


10.7 


5.4 


4.3 


6.8 


Street Opening Permits Issued & 
Inspected 


198 


183 


175 


145 


148 


Sewer Connections reviewed for 
Board of Health 


47 


50 


48 


25 


35 


Assessors Maps updated 


59 


49 


30 


45 


48 


Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# 
plans/# lots) 


26/146 


17/51 


16/62 


18/68 


16/53 


Performance Bonds figured for 
Planning Board 


8 


14 


9 


6 


9 


Subdivision Construction 
Inspections/Tests: 












Water mains (ft.) 


17,121 


18,314 


13,200 


9,105 


5,734 


Sewer mains (ft.) 


6,000 


4,314 


2,619 


3,920 


2,787 


Drain lines (ft.) 


10,547 


6,315 


2,890 


4,480 


2,729 


Sidewalks (ft.) 


4,370 


5,103 


3,854 


1,580 


5,388 


Roads Paved: Binder coarse (ft.) 
Top coarse (ft.) 


7,112 
6,587 


2,069 
5,974 


5,380 
4,280 


2,800 
3,150 


1,586 

8,432 


Streets Reviewed for Town 
Acceptance 


14 


9 


12 


7 


6 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. During the fall, spring and summer 
month, two sweepers are continuously kept busy cleaning winter sand off all streets and cleaning 
road construction areas. Both sweepers start work at 5:00 A.M. to take advantage of low traffic 



54 



and parking conditions. The Highway Division is responsible for the maintenance of the Town's 
sidewalk infrastructure. The Division also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new 
roads prior to acceptance as public ways. The Division is responsible for the cleaning and 
maintenance of all storm water systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as 
maintenance of water courses impaired by beaver dams. The Highway Division is the lead 
agency responsible for snow and ice removal and flood control measures; other Town divisions 
assist in these operations. 





1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Number of streets resurfaced 


52 


56 


23 




30 


Total number of miles of road resurfaced 


16.3 


10.7 


5.4 


4.3 


6.8 


Total number of feet of curbs constructed 


6,075 


12,115 


22,104 


23,500 


14,282 


Catch basins cleaned 


957 


936 


586 


397 


231 


Storm drains cleaned 


17 


9 







3 


Catch basins repaired 


31 


30 


41 


24 


51 


Storm drains repaired 


3 


1 


4 


5 






SOLID WASTE 

Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its 
refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover, 
where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the 
mandatory curbside recycling program for newspapers/magazines, junk mail, office paper, 
telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin metal containers, glass, #1 through #7 plastics and 
aluminum containers. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass clippings compost site on High 
Plain Road near Bald Hill. The Town screens and grinds the material annually with the compost 
being available to Town residents. The Town has expanded the curbside recycling program to 
include the aluminum materials, #1 through #7 plastics and corrugated containers (cardboard). 





1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Tons of residential refuse collected 


11,753 


11,888 


12,764 


13,142 


13,280 


Tons of mixed residential paper 


2,213 


2,137 


2,668 


2,479 


2,540 


Tons of corrugated containers 











275 


340 


Tons of glass recycled 


431 


423 


455 


488 


532 


Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 


7 


7 


8 


37 


31 


Tons of #1 & #2 plastics 


39 


47 


52 


37 


31 


Tons of aluminum materials 


5 


4 


12 


37 


32 


Tons of leaves & grass clipping composted 


2,200 


2,200 


2,200 


3,000 


3,000 



WATER 

The Water Distribution Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of 190 
miles of water mains ranging from 6" to 24" in size; 2,600 fire hydrants and 10,400 water service 
accounts. 



55 



The Water Treatment Plant processed 2.338 billion gallons (average 6.4 MGD) to 
produce 2.118 billion gallons of finish water delivered to the distribution system. Forty- four 
percent (44%) of the water was for residential use, seventeen percent (17%) for commercial and 
twelve percent (12%) was classified as industrial use. Additionally, 1.720 billion gallons was 
diverted from the Merrimack River to Haggett's Pond through the Fish Brook Pump Station. 

During the four compliance periods in 2002 volatile organic compounds, synthetic 
organic compounds, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, inorganic compounds, and secondary 
contaminants were monitored. The water system was in compliance with all parameters. There 
were no violations with the Total Coliform Rule and monitoring for Giardia, Cryptosporidium, 
and enteric viruses suggests 99.9% removal of these organisms. 

Scheduled maintenance was completed on treatment plant equipment, including; ozone, 
low service, high service pumps, backwash, chemical feed, and chemical storage units. Over 
300,000 pounds of spent and virgin activated carbon was removed/replaced in filter process 
units. Carbon media in the odor-control system at the Shawsheen Station was replaced. 
Morningside Drive, Wobum Street and Snowberry Road waste collection systems were placed 
on-line. Fish Brook at the Merrimack River was on-line for 220 days, diverting 1.720 billion 
gallons to Haggetts Pond. 





1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Hydrants Repaired 


36 


36 


45 


87 


117 


Hydrants Replaced 





4 


1 


7 


14 


Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 






211 


383 


278 


Hydrants Flushed 


1 


2 


106 


235 


183 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


19 


16 


9 


23 


35 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


18 


6 


14 


17 


11 


House Services Renewed 


3 


13 


13 


21 


35 


Water Main Service Repaired 


4 


11 


9 


16 


12 


New Water Meter Accounts/Installations 


134 


116 


116 


98 


52 


Old Water Meters Replaced 


121 


132 


197 


379 


286 


Water Meters bench checked 


5 


7 


1 


17 


12 


Water Shut Offs/Tum On 


188 


178 


177 


209 


194 


Gate Boxes Adjusted 


46 


28 


36 


51 


48 


Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


2,075 


2,452 


2,102 


2,377 


2,388 


Average daily gallons pumped (in million 
gal.) 


5.004 


6.51 


5.76 


6.51 


6.54 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


13.949 


13.430 


11.053 


12.976 


14.505 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood Street, Shawsheen Village, 
and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 87 miles of sanitary 
sewers along with five (5) new pumping stations and 5,680 connections with an additional 24 



56 



miles of mainline sewer and 1 ,600 connections scheduled to come on line over the next three 
years. The raw sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by 
means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's 
Regional Treatment Plant in North Andover for disposal. 





1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


47 


28 


46 


67 


53 


Sewer Main Rodded Regular 
Maintenance 


8 


3 


3 


44 


39 


Sewer Mains Repaired/Replaced 


2 


1 


3 


7 


3 


Sewer Services Cleared 


13 


3 


7 


N/A 


N/A 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District (GLSD) wastewater treatment facility continued 
to provide service to residential, commercial and industrial users in 2002. Since it began 
operation in April 1977, the facility has treated 290 billion gallons of wastewater that was 
previously discharged, untreated, into the Merrimack River. 

Disposal of sewage sludge, the by-product of treatment, is the GLSD's largest single 
expense. It was trucked to Maine, Canada, and Connecticut for disposal. The GLSD recently 
completed construction of a sewage digester that reduces the volume of sludge by nearly 50% 
while producing Methane gas for heating and creating a more environmentally friendly product. 
The sludge to fertilizer plant construction has been completed and has implemented a safe 
economic alternative to landfilling of raw sludge. The GLSD expects to save $1 million per year 
in sludge disposal costs and the savings will be shared by member communities by lower 
operating cost assessments. 

There are currently 48 people staffing the plant. The operation is continuous 24 hours per 
day and 365 days per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 





1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Andover' s daily average flow to the 

Sanitary 

District (in millions of gallons) 


4.322 


3,500 


3,959 


3,734 


3,484 


Sanitary District (in millions of gallons) 


32,849 


26,478 


30,245 


27,665 


27,399 



57 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



STREET RESURFACING 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 



1 a nnn 


1 














■ 


14,000 - 




12,000 - 


-1 ■ 












— 


Z 10,000 
O 














— 








— 


8,000 - 


- 






















6,000 - 
























4,000 - 










— 












—• 


2.000 

























1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 

□ Refuse ■ Newspapers/ Magazines □ Glass 



WATER TREATED 



2,500 




2,000 



1998 



1999 2000 2001 



2002 



58 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover a myriad of social, 
educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility for all. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into valued 
programs for its citizens now and in the future. 



The Division of Community Services (DCS) offers year-round recreational, enrichment and 
cultural programs for residents of all ages. Through the mutual mission of educating its residents, the 
Andover School Department and Community Services have an agreement to open the public schools 
to community use through DCS. The Division celebrated its thirtieth birthday in 2002 with continued 
offerings of community-wide programs. After school programs are held system-wide, while the 
majority of the evening adult education programs are housed at Andover High School. In addition to 
the public schools, programs are held at Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, The Park, Senior Center, 
Greater Lawrence Regional Technical High School and other in-town facilities. Community Services 
transfuses residents' ideas into valued programs. Through the Division's vigorous efforts, services to 
the Town's residents are continuously improved.. Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of 
community-based instructors, streamlined registration including FAX, VISA/MasterCard, overnight 
mailbox, cable TV promotion and telephone registration. 

Family-oriented activities have been popular such as the Summer Pre-school Park events, 
nature walks and the Father/Daughter and Town Hall dances. The North East Regional, 
Massachusetts and Park Association Recreation Departments borrowed the Division's 
Father/Daughter dance idea and have each expressed their delight over the success of using the 
Andover model in their communities. Many of the DCS popular classes encourage family 
participation such as volleyball, yoga, ballroom dancing, sign language, tot and parent programs, 
crafts, CPR and skating nights. 

DCS instructors come from all segments of the community. Professionals, specialists, hobby 
enthusiasts, homemakers, student interns and retired individuals comprise the teaching and 
leadership staff. This varied instructor base provides the ability to offer diverse programs. The 
majority of the instructional staff resides within the Town, however, in several instances DCS is able 
to bring in quality programs from outside the region (science, enrichment and sports). This year DCS 
offered 82 new programs for children and adults. Over 150 classes were offered each tri-semester 
with recent enrollments totaling 5,176 individuals. Sports clinics, all-new speed clinic, soccer, 
tennis, fencing and mini mites soccer continue to be the most popular youth programs. The 
Gingerbread House Workshop diversified into a Halloween-themed night that was very popular. In 
addition to these classes, DCS offers school vacation programs, after school skiing, trips, 
playgrounds, special events and a public swimming program at Pomps Pond. 

Improvements to the Pomps Pond waterfront continue each year. A paddleboat was added to 
the fleet of sailboats for family rentals. Several Eagle Scout projects included construction of a 
wooden bridge along a trail in the pond area and handrails and trail improvements throughout the 
park. The staircase near the shelter at Recreation Park was completely renovated by an Eagle Scout. 



59 



During the Summer months, DCS serves well over 15,000 people. Approximately 1,700 
children a day participated in programs during the month of July. The Fourth of July Pancake 
Breakfast and Horribles Parade attracted over 5,000 people. Three thousand patriotic citizens ate 
breakfast while a host of others cheered their neighbors, participated in games and activities and 
enjoyed the concert and entertainers. The Summer Concerts in The Park attracted over 300 persons 
each week for the family musical programs. 

The Andona Society provided $ 1 ,700 in scholarships to low-income residents to participate 
in Summer programs. DCS also awarded $4,000 alternative service projects to residents in need of 
assistance in order to attend DCS-sponsored activities. 

Networking with the community, DCS continues to develop programs in cooperation with 
local businesses and Town departments. The Division uses local resources to compliment its full- 
time staff. Eight Tax Voucher volunteers work with staff assisting with registration, general office 
duties and after-school and evening programming. In addition, numerous students perform 
community service hours for school, religious education or the Alternative Sentencing Program. 
Collaboration with the Andover Village Improvement Society (A.V.I.S.) has been very successful. 
Weekend walks on AVIS and conservation lands were given by local wardens free of charge. 

DCS assists the community by encouraging healthy lifestyles including offering a variety of 
fitness programs, courses on wellness and through programs such as Alliance for the Mentally 111 
(NAMI). A workshop and National Awareness Day for students carrying backpacks was a success 
due to the participation of Doherty Middle School students on their way to schooi. A DCS staff 
member is the Town's designated representative to the United Way during their yearly pledge efforts. 
This year, the Town received a bronze award for their contributions. Mittens are collected each 
December at numerous locations around the Town including the public schools, Library and Senior 
Center. Thousands of mittens are donated to the Lazarus House in Lawrence through this giving 
program. DCS also assists residents who are unable to pay tuition, participates in an alternative 
service program in lieu of payment, provides assistance with Town-wide functions for PTO 
fundraising and social organizations. DCS worked closely with the organizers preparing for the visit 
of several guests from Andover, England and provided them with a series of local trips to showcase 
the New England coastline and Fall foliage. 

As technology improves, DCS keeps pace with the computer age. On-line courses are offered 
monthly through a new service with www.ed2go.com/dcs . This fairly new way for adults to learn is 
perfect for business use while at work or for learning at home. Participants can update their skills, 
discover a new talent or chart a career path at their own pace. More than 200 courses are offered each 
month. The beauty of the on-line course is that the class will run no matter how many are enrolled. 

The revolving account continues to assist the Division in its ability to sponsor a variety of 
activities and trips. School vacation programs, Children's Studio for the Arts and Summer Theatre 
Ensemble, violin lessons, John Smith Soccer, Big Apple Circus, Blue Man Group, a Boston Harbor 
Island cruise and a Radio City Music Hall trip to New York are examples of programs that were 
funded through this account. 



60 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

FALL PARTICIPATION 

Fall Classes Youth ages 2 - 1 8 1,228 

Adults 689 

Harvest Moon Ball and Holly Ball 3 1 9 

Special Events/Trips 235 

TOTAL Fall Participation 2,47 1 

WINTER PARTICIPATION 

Winter Classes: Youth ages 2 - 1 8 1,240 

Adults 774 

Ski Program: Bradford Ski grades 3-8 260 

Nashoba Ski grades 6-8 50 

Youth Vacation Basketball 374 

Adult Basketball 80 

Father/Daughter Dance 397 

Special Events/Trips 85 

TOTAL Winter Participation 3,245 



SUMMER PARTICIPATION 



Summer Classes: 


Youth ages 2 




Adults 


Special School-Age Children's Programs: 


All-Day Discovery 


grades K-5 


Summer Theatre 


grades 2-10 


John Smith Soccer 


grades K-5 


Club for All 


grades 5-9 


Drop-in Playground 


grades K-5 


Drop-in Field Trips 


grades K-5 


Special Pre-School Age Children's 


> Programs: 


Shee-Hee 


ages 3-4 


Park Events 


ages 1-6 


Pomps Pond: 




Stickers 




Daily Attendance 




Average number of people 


per day 


Concerts: 




The Park 


all ages 


Pomps Pond 


all ages 


Special Events: 




Fourth of July 


all ages 


Trips 


all ages 


Co-Ed Adult Softball League 


adults 


TOTAL Summer Participation 





18 1,023 

222 

1,400 

205 

636 

50 

250 

1,500 

146 
700 

200 
30+/cars 
200/day 

2,450 
350 

5,000 

192 

600 

25,924 

TOTAL YEAR-LONG PARTICIPATION 3 1 ,640+ 



61 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Sennces is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point (Senior Center) in the community where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

The Division of Elder Services extends sincere appreciation to all staff, volunteers, 
students, Town officials, businesses and other members of the community who support the 
vision and mission of the Senior Center. 

THE GROWING COMMUNITY OF ELDERS AND THE GROWING NEED FOR 
SERVICES 

The elder population continues to increase nationally and locally. Andover will have 
nearly 10,000 people over age 60 within the next 10 years, about one-third of the total 
population. This single statistic is of primary importance in the Town's Visioning process: will 
we be ready? As more residents seek assistance, either for themselves or for their aging family 
members, the division will continue to create and provide specialized programs and services in 
fulfillment of its mission, as laid out by the Council on Aging, following the charge of the Town 
Meeting of March 12, 1966: 

Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these needs; 

Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs, or coordinate existing services in 

the community; 

Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist elderly in the 

community; and 

Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated in 

this Article (35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health, nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence and combat 
isolation. We continue to develop creative Intergenerational programs serving both elders and 
young people from pre-school to college age. Our Health, Wellness & Nutrition programs 
continue to provide a wide variety of opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve health. 
Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, educational and recreational 
programs, intergenerational opportunities, building the volunteer corps, and various 
administrative improvements. 

ECONOMIC CONSTRAINTS 

In the face of decreases in outside support, particularly state and federal grants, we 
struggle to keep core services in place and the need grows dramatically. Coordination with other 
agencies and advocacy on the state and federal level, grant writing and outside fundraising 
become increasingly important. Fess will take on a more significant role in the budget as well. 



62 



INCREASES IN NEED 

Increases in requests for services, especially for the homebound, are a key forecaster of 
difficult economic times. For example, over the past year we have seen significant increases in 
the number of Meals on Wheels, requests for Friendly Visitors, and Medical Transportation trips. 
We expect this trend to continue as the negative affects of the economy influence this population 
first, and often, most severely. 

SPACE 

As we continue to identify needs, create programs and deliver services we also continue 
to be bound by the constraints of insufficient and inappropriate space. Nearly Five thousand 
(5,000) blocks of time were scheduled in over seventeen (17) different sites throughout the 
community, resulting in time consuming scheduling and control issues. 

THE COUNCIL ON AGING AND THE SENIOR CENTER TASK FORCE 

The demographics and the financial future of the town require a fiscally responsible 
solution to the services and space issues identified. The Senior Center Task Force is working 
diligently to solve this dilemma and will report to the Town Meeting its progress. The Council 
on Aging is currently in the process of analyzing its recent Needs Assessment Survey and will 
make a full report to the Board of Selectmen in the Spring of 2003. 



Elder Services Budget FY2003 



Fees, Grants, 

Donations 

16% 




Volunteers 
40% 



Municipal 
44% 



DVolunteers ^Municipal □ Fees, Grants, Donations 



63 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



f 

MEALS SERVED 

->n nnn 


jU,UUU 

25,000 
20,000 
15,000 






































































10,000 


— 








— 














5,000 


- 





















- 


U 

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 


D Meals-on-Wheels DOn-Site Lunches 


L 



MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 



1,400 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



r 

VALUE OF VOLUNTEER SERVICE 


$550,000 










$500,000 






__^-«l 




$450,000 


f "*\ 




/ ^** 




$400,000 


/ 




/ 




$350,000 


y 




r 




$300,000 


/ 




/ 




$250,000 


/ 




/ 




$200,000 


* 








$150,000 






1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 





r 


TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
VALUE TO TOWN 




\ 


$200,000 







$180,000 














$160,000 
$140,000 
$120,000 
$100,000 








/ 




/ 
/ 








1998 1999 2000 2001 


2002 









64 



ANDOVER YOUTH SERVICES 

The A YS aims to provide young people useful experiences to promote healthy growth and 
development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe, and challenging 
youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young adolescents and their 
families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services, 
and activities throughout the year. The AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is our mission to develop and 
maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use their 
creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The support piece of the AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the 
community service program, our after-school adventure-based program, drop-in and flexible 
office hours, court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, 
college and employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, 
outreach, 24-hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups and 
specialized in-school groups. 

AYS events provide a community venue for young people to expose their creative talents. 
The 4 th annual 'Keep It Wild' Fashion Show, 4 th annual Homegrown Film Festival, Shakespeare 
in the Park and numerous concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and presented unique 
entertainment opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. The Andover Youth Services remained dedicated to establishing a community- 
wide network of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising and advocacy for 
youth. Each of the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services, and 
outreach to those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: 
Andover Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Inc., Friends of Andover Youth, Andover 
Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support (CARES), Gender Equity 
Committee, and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then 
takes these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young 
people, whether it is handing out flyers or creating plans for a new youth center, the programs 
the Youth Services creates and implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and 
need. By staying true to our philosophy, the AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups, and programs for all young people of Andover in the new millennium. 



65 



PROGRAMS 

The Andover Youth Services Summer Program - Ramble On - May to August 

The Summer of 2002 was another great adventure at the Andover Youth Services. 
Through a series of fun and challenging activities, the young people who participated 
received a chance to express themselves and share their experiences in a positive, 
supporting environment. Over a thousand young people joined the AYS summer 
program and had best time of their lives. The essence of the summer program was within 
the eight weeks of our summer experience entitled, Ramble On. The program offered a 
wide variety of trips, adventures and services that attracted the interest of middle school 
students. The program encouraged young people to participate and experience activities 
that were new, diverse and challenging. The outdoor adventures offered (for example: 
rock climbing, backpacking, and kayaking) provide opportunities to teach about the value 
of natural resources in an exciting and fun manner. 

Ultimate Frisbee -Year-round 

Young people indicated that they wanted Ultimate Frisbee and the AYS provided week- 
long clinics taught by high school mentors and experienced coaches. Based upon the 
success of the High School Ultimate Frisbee teams, middle school boys and girls learned 
the multiple throws, offense and defense strategies and other skills in this fast-paced 
sport. 

Field Hockey -Summer - Fall 

The AYS ran a clinic that brought high school students into a mentoring role by 
providing instruction on stick-handling, passing and other elements of the game. 

Street Hockey, Basketball, Open Gym - Summer 

In the AYS tradition of taking new ideas and generating them into programs, a Street 
Hockey program, Open Gym and AYS High School Summer Basketball League became 
instant successes. The Street Hockey program gave a group of middle school students 
the opportunity to gather and play pick up games in the Summer evenings. Open Gym 
provided a similar pick up atmosphere for high school basketball players. The AYS 
Summer Basketball League was designed and developed by a high school senior, Patrick 
Sullivan, and brought over a hundred players and spectators down to the AHS Field 
House for bi-weekly games and a season-ending tournament. The programs will 
continue next Summer and some beyond the Summer months due to their success. 

Lacrosse - Year-round 

Since 1997, the AYS has continued to expand the Lacrosse program in Andover. The 
youth league experienced overwhelming increase in enrollment and additional youth 
teams were added for both girls and boys. The AYS implemented several Summer 
Lacrosse programs due to the overwhelming demand for year-round Lacrosse programs. 
The Youth Services produced successful beginners programs for youths ages 8-10 and 
pick up leagues for middle school boys and girls who wanted to improve upon their skills 
or learn the sport for the first time. In addition to expansion on the youth level, AYS 



66 



funded and implemented a Girls Lacrosse team into the High School in the Spring of 
2002. Lacrosse has been a year-round effort offering clinics, introductory sessions and 
pick up sessions. We continue to support this growing program by sustaining year-round 
fundraising efforts, recruiting coaches and volunteers. 

Andover Snowboard Club - December to April 

The Andover Snowboard Club is a group of skiers and riders who share the love for the 
snow and travel to Sugarbush, Mt. Snow, Loon, Sunday River, Stratton for the US Open 
and more for some stellar outdoor recreation. The ASC ventures north monthly and also 
collaborates with the Phillips Academy Snowboard Club. 

Afterschool Programs - September to June 

Flag Football, Field Hockey, Learn to Snowboard, Street Hockey, Rock Climbing, Spring 
Open Gym, Ultimate Frisbee, Rugby, Middle School Intramurals, Track program, 
Volleyball program, Outing Club, Bowling Club, etc. 

Vacation Day Programs - Varies 

Developed a variety of program opportunities during holidays and vacation days for 
middle school and high school students. 

SUPPORT SERVICES - Year-Round 

Community Service - The willingness of young people to serve their community was 
demonstrated thoroughly over the course of the community service days. The young people 
enthusiastically helped community trails by dragging huge logs and boards to build a bog 
bridge, clearing brush and dead trees to create a new trail, and hacking through brush to 
reclaim an overgrown trail. On another service day we helped out at the Franciscan Center, 
clearing brush and restoring a peace garden. The energy of the youth was focused in a 
manner that verified that young people can make a visible difference in their community. 

Venture Out Program - offers a variety of challenging activities for young men and women. 
We create a powerful group by forming trust and building strong friendships/ relationships. 
The young people are challenged mentally, physically, and socially. By participating in this 
group, the youth will develop vital self-confidence that will carry into every aspect of their 
lives and community. 

Drop-in and flexible office hours. 

Court-related services. 

Volunteer and intern opportunities. 

Hospital visits. 

Referrals. 

Employment network. 

College and Employment Recommendations. 

Fundraising for Youth Programs. 

Crisis Intervention. 

Outreach. 



67 



24-Hour Emergency Response. 
Parent Support and Education. 
Discussion groups. 
Specialized In-School Groups. 
Transportation. 

EVENTS 

Keep It Wild Fashion Show - December to June 

The 4 l Annual 'Keep It Wild' Fashion Show provided 20 designers and over 50 models a 
venue to expose their creative talents. Student designers sewed outfits and recruited 
models who would showcase their work. The magnitude of the show required that the 
AHS Field House be transformed into an atmosphere of style and fashion with pulsing 
music and a 100-foot runway. Five hundred people turned out to this unique June event. 

Other Events 

Shakespeare in the Park 
Larry Robinson Road Race 
Comedy Night with Lenny Clarke 
Making Connections 
Parent-to-Parent Groups in AYS Office 
Check it Out - Police Forum 
Service Club Annual Event 

Concerts/Shows - Year-Round 

The AYS collaborates with a variety of young people who are interested in putting on 
concerts, dances, and special shows. Each show has its own particulars and on average 
we produce one to two shows per month. Examples in 2002: Piebald Concert, GSA 
Techno Dance Party, several OTH shows, Night of Hypnotic Delight, etc 

ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK - May to December 

The Andover Community Skate Park is a positive and safe environment open to all ages and 
abilities that promotes and encourages individual expression and learning. The Park provides 
a positive atmosphere centered around respect for others and, most importantly, fun. 

The Andover Community Skate Park continued to play an influential role at the AYS. Aside 
from normal hours of operation, many young people had the opportunity to participate in 
skateboarding lessons and clinics. High school mentors instructed youth on the various 
skateboarding tricks and ramp riding techniques. The ACSP hosted two professional 
skateboard demonstrations over the Summer months bringing in more than 400 spectators for 
each demo. Skateboard competitions allowed local youth to showcase their honed skills and 
win some prizes at the same time. The Andover Community Skate Park remains an 
extremely positive asset to the community. 



68 



NETWORKING AND ADVOCACY - Year-round 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with young 
people. The Andover Youth Services is dedicated to establishing a community-wide network of 
supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following organizations, 
creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for youth. Each of 
the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services, and outreach to those 
young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover. 

Andover Youth Council 

The AYS operates directly with the Andover Youth Council. This council is comprised 
of thirteen high school students, and three adult members chosen from the community at 
large. The mission of the Youth Council is to advocate for all youth, to bring more 
services pertaining to issues relevant to their lives. The goal is to empower young people 
in the community by getting them involved with community organizations, schools, town 
government, in order to create opportunities for youth. This council has become an 
official part of the Town structure and their office is located in the Town Offices next to 
the Youth Services Office. 

Andover Youth Foundation, Inc. 

A non-profit corporation organized to undertake the construction of a youth center for the 
youth of Andover. 

Friends of Andover Youth 

Friends of Andover Youth is an organization of adults dedicated to connecting youth to 
one another and to the community. Working with and as advocates for the Andover 
Youth Council and Andover Youth Services, they support events, activities, and 
programs that promote growth, self-discovery, self-confidence, and community spirit in 
young people. To achieve this mission, Friends of Andover Youth raise funds, write 
grants, and lobby politically for improved community youth services. 

Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support (CARES) 

Andover CARES is dedicated to supporting life affirming choices, fostering resiliency, 
and increasing a sense of belonging in the community of Andover. 

Gender Equity Committee 

The Andover Public Schools Gender Initiative committee works with our schools to 
create a fuller educational experience for both boys and girls through the whole child 
awareness: respecting assertiveness and sensitivity, nurturing and strength in children of 
both sexes. The main work addresses gender bias in the school system and supports 
efforts that challenge gender limitations in the Schools and the Town. 

■ AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP) 

The Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program helps youth workers and 
youth-serving agencies offer educational and recreational outdoor opportunities for their 
youth. The AMC encourages the involvement of all people in its mission and activities 



69 



and their goal is to be a community that is comfortable, inviting, and accessible for 
people of any age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation or 
socioeconomic status. 

AYS PROGRAM BREAKDOWN WITH 50+ PARTICIPANTS 



PROGRAM 


2001 


2002 




Summer Program 


1400 


1570 


Lacrosse 


400 


450 


Keep it Wild 


500 


500 


Ultimate Frisbee 


120 


150 


Snowboard Club 


200 


250 


School Vacation Programs 


200 


250 


After School Programs 


600 


700 


Andover Community Skate Park 


1160 


1400 


Drop in / Support 


200 


200 


Concerts/Shows 


1500 


1800 


TOTALS 


6280 


7270 



60% Middle School participants 

40% High School participants 

Approximately half are repeat participants (3,635) 



AYS Program Participants 1998-2002 



Number of 
Participants 



8OOO-1 






7000- 


















/ 








/ 










6000- 
























5000- 








4000 




' 


















3000- 












2000 












1000- 
0- 











1998 



1999 



2000 
Year 



2001 



2002 



70 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all state and federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to over 3,500 of Andover's veterans and their families. In 2002, the 
Office responded to inquiries or requests from over 745 local veterans and provided direct financial 
assistance for fuel, food, housing, burials and medical needs to several dozen Andover families. The 
Town annually receives reimbursement from the Commonwealth for 75% of the funds provided to 
local veterans under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

The Office also planned and coordinated the patriotic observances on Veterans Day, 
Memorial Day, Flag Day, the anniversary of September 1 1 th and placed over 5,500 flags on the 
graves of veterans buried in Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year were 
also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

A major highlight in 2002 was the placement of over 670 local veterans on a special Veterans 
Administration Pharmacy Program. The Program allows veterans to receive 30-day supplies of 
prescription drugs by mail for $7.00 saving them thousands of dollars. 

The Veterans Services Office Director is also the Town's Graves Registration and Burial 
Officer. During 2002, seventy-eight Andover veterans died - sixty-one were World War II veterans, 
fifteen were Korean veterans and six were Vietnam veterans. Several of these veterans fought in 
more than one war. 

According to the latest Federal Government statistics, 2,885 Andover veterans and/or their 
family members received $2,723,010 in Veterans Administration benefits in 2002. 

Formal ceremonies were held on Memorial Day, Flag Day, July 4 th , V-J Day, POW/MIA 
Day, Veterans Day and Pearl Harbor Day. 

The Veterans Office continued to monitor the protection and rehabilitation of the 
Woodbridge-Jenkins Revolutionary War Cemetery. The cemetery which had been endangered by a 
construction project is now owned by the Town. The Office also engaged in an on-going project of 
identifying and marking all veterans' graves and computerizing all burial records within the Town's 
ten cemeteries. 



71 



Andover Veterans Deaths - 2002 * 



1. 


GODEK, John S. 


Army 


Vietnam 


2. 


BISHOP, Harold P. 


Navy 


WWII 


3. 


HILTON, Henry L. 


USMC 


WWII 






Navy/USMC 


Korea 


4. 


MINICUCCI, Peter P. 


Army 


WWII 


5. 


SHEEHY, Augustine 


Navy 


WWII 


6. 


McPARLAND, Francis H. 


Army 


WWII 


7. 


MEAGHER, Frederick F. 


Army 


Korea 


8. 


LaROSA, Raymond S. 


Navy 


WWII 


9. 


FITZGERALD, Jeremiah 


Army 


WWII 


10. 


WINTERS, Charles H. 


Army 


WWII 


11. 


MAGANE, Bernard 


Navy 


WWII 


12. 


LUNDERGAN, Charles 


Navy 


WWII 


13. 


BELL, Robert H. 


USCG 


Vietnam 


14. 


DEYERMOND, Calvin C. 


AAC 


wwn 


15. 


McQUADE, Thomas D. 


Navy 


WWII 


16. 


HOFFMAN, Sidney 


Army 


wwn 


17. 


DOUCET, Norman F. 


Navy 


wwn 


18. 


LARATONDA, Michael D. 


AAC 


WWII 


19. 


ASHTON, Richard W. 


Army 


WWII 


20. 


BROWN, William S. 


AAC 


wwn 


21. 


FOURNIER, Jean 


Navy 


Vietnam 


22. 


VENTRILLO, Albert 


Navy 


wwn 


23. 


SUTER, William A. 


Navy 


WWII 


24. 


HALEY, Ronald D. 


Army 


wwn 


25. 


PUCCI, Raymond C. 


Army 


wwn 


26. 


SULLIVAN, James F. 


AAC 


WWII 


27. 


JACKSON, Stephen F. 


Navy 


Vietnam 


28. 


COWAN, Robert C. 


AAC 


wwn 



72 



29. 


THERRIAULT, Norman 


Army 


Peacetime 


30. 


ST. JEAN, Doris "Evvy" 


Navy 


WWII 


31. 


POITRAS, Wilfred J. 


Army 


Korea 


32. 


OTTES, Herbert 


Navy 


WWII 


33. 


RUSSEM, Theodore 


Navy 


WWII 


34. 


ARSENAULT, Raymond 


Army 


WWII 


35. 


SLADE, Richard G. 


Navy 


WWII 


36. 


MESSINA, Santo T. 


USCG 


WWII 


37. 


HARIG,KarlG. Jr. 


USCG 


WWII 


38. 


JOHNSON, Wilfred J. 


Navy 


Korea 


39. 


YUNGGEBAUER, Fred H. 




Korea 


40. 


PFISTER, Robert 


AAC 


WWII 


41. 


GODEK, Stanley J. 


Navy 


WWII 


42. 


FUCCI, Domenic 


Navy 


WWII 


43. 


SHERWOOD, Ruth F. 


USCG 


WWII 


44. 


SHAPIRO, Eugene L. 


Army 


wwn 


45. 


MUNROE, William 


Navy 


WWII 


46. 


HURLEY, William C. 


Army 


Korea 


47. 


ST. JEAN, Edith V. 


Army 


WWII 


48. 


WITMAN, Theodore 


Navy 


WWII 


49. 


HUTCHINS, George A. 


Army 


WWII 


50. 


McDONALD, John G. 


Army & Navy 


WWII 


51. 


BARRON, Chas S. 


Navy 


Korea 


52. 


WEBB, Bradford E. 


Army 


wwn 


53. 


HAMILTON, Howard C. 


Navy 


wwn 


54. 


COLEMAN, Richard T. 


AAC 


WWII 


55. 


WHITE, John B. Jr. 


Navy 


wwn 


56. 


WISEMAN, Charles F. 


Navy 


WWII 


57. 


HOFFMAN, S.Joseph 


Army 


wwn 


58. 


LUCY, Francis J. 


Army 


wwn 


59. 


HARRIMAN, Herbert C. 


Army 


Korea 



73 



60. GAUNT, Charles 

61. COOMBES, Richard 

62. MURPHY, Thomas F. 

63. BAVUSO, Michael S. 

64. LENO, Patrick 

65. NICOLL, Shirley I. 

66. ANDERSON, James T. 

67. FITZGERALD, Charles K. 

68. LANE, Robert E. 

69. MORRISON, Edward R. 

70. BAILEY, Michael J. 

71. HAGGERTY, John E. 

72. MILLHEIM, Donald F. 

73. SPANGENBERGER, Wilbur 

74. McGREGOR, William 

75. DEMERS, Leonard J. 

76. PARKS, David A. 

77. KELLY, James A. 

78. FOSSE, Arthur E. 



AAC 


WWII 


USMC 


Korea 


USMC 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


Navy 


wwn 


USMC 


Peacetime 


Army 


WW II, Korea & VN 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


wwn 


USCG 


WWII 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


USMC 


wwn 


USAF 


Korea 



* The above list was compiled by Andover Veterans Director John Doherty. It is accurate 
to the best of his knowledge. Please report errors or omissions to him at 978-623-8218. 



74 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2002, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles and attended all Town 
Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and 
numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. In particular, 
many easements were drafted for the on-going expansion of the Town's sewer system. Town 
Counsel also participated in the drafting of amendments to the Ballardvale Historic District 
Regulations and the Zoning Bylaw. 

The year also saw an increase in the number of comprehensive permit applications under 
General Laws Chapter 40B, and several of the Zoning Board of Appeals decisions on 
comprehensive permits were appealed to the Commonwealth's Housing Appeals Committee. A 
mediation session was held on the application for a comprehensive permit on River Road, 
resulting in the Board of Appeals eventually approving the application. That approval has been 
appealed by several residents. 

Town Counsel participated in negotiating and drafting an Agreement with the Andover 
Youth Foundation, Inc. regarding the proposed construction of a Youth Center near Greenwood 
Road. 

Town Counsel also assisted the Board of Selectmen in submitting proposals to the state 
legislature for changes to the State's bidding laws for public construction. 



75 




ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8501 
FAX (978) 623-8505 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 
Tina B. Cirdwood, Chairman 
Richard ). Collins. Secretary 
Frank M. Eccles 
Gerald F. Custus 
Christopher Smith 



CLAUDIA L. BACH, ED.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 

cbach@apsl.net 



ANNUAL REPORT 

2002 
Andover School Department 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the community, 

is to provide students with the knowledge, skill, and qualities 

required to be successful in a diverse society. 

The most significant event in the Town of Andover in 2002 was the opening of High Plain Elementary 
School and Wood Hill Middle School in West Andover. It was in 1969 that the Town opened its last new school, 
Bancroft, and never before have we opened two schools at the same time. Designed by Symmes, Manni & 
McKee Architects and built by John T Callahan & Sons Contractors, High Plain and Wood Hill were 
completed for the start of school in September and within the funding allocated by the Town. The schools 
opened with a middle school population of 439 and an elementary population of 548 students. 

The new schools were the result of sustained efforts of many individuals and groups: School 
Committee, Strategic Task Force, Building Committee, staff from both School and Town departments, and 
Principals Norah McCarthy and Brenda O'Brien. To prepare for the opening, school staff planned transition 
activities for redistricting of more than 1,300 students to the new and existing schools throughout the Town, and 
developed a staffing plan for the transfer to the new schools of more than 170 teachers, administrators, and 
support staff. The opening of our new schools brought to a close the overcrowded conditions in our elementary 
and middle schools, a situation that limited important programs and activities in recent years for the students 
of the Andover Public Schools. 

During the 2002 school year the student population in the Andover Public Schools realized modest 
growth, increasing to 5,963 students, up from 5,884 the year before. Along with more than 700 professional and 
support staff, our students are housed in one 9-12 high school, three 6-8 middle schools, five K-5 elementary 
schools, and one K-2 controlled choice school. 

With the opening of two new schools and the escalating cost of special education services, the School 
Committee brought forward a request at the April Town Meeting for an override of Proposition 2 Vi to provide 
an additional $1,130,000 to the School Budget. The vote was passed at Town Meeting, and defeated at the Town 
election on June 11. 

School Committee and Central Administration 

The five elected members of the School Committee typically met twice monthly during the year. Mr. 
Eric Nadworny stepped down from the Committee at the end of his second term, and at the March election Mr. 
Christopher Smith was elected to replace him. At its first meeting following the election, the Committee 
appointed Ms. Tina Girdwood, Chairperson and Mr. Richard Collins, Secretary. 

In June 2002 the Superintendent appointed Ms. Moira O'Brien Principal of Shawsheen School to 
replace Ms. Brenda O'Brien who became Principal of High Plain Elementary School. Ms. McCarthy 
completed her assignment to oversee all educational and program aspects of the construction projects of both 
new schools, and assumed the position of Principal of Wood Hill Middle School. In October 2002 the 
Superintendent appointed Ms. Marcia O'Neil to the position of Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum, 
Instruction, Assessment and Professional Development, replacing Dr. Marine! McGrath who resigned in the 
summer to become Superintendent of Schools in Hamilton-Wenham, Massachusetts. Before coming to 
Andover Ms. O'Neil served as Director of Curriculum and Instruction in North Reading, Massachusetts. 

In the spring, with substantial input from teachers, administrators and Townwide PTO, the School 
Committee approved the Goals and Objectives for the7fi)02-2003 school year. 



They are: 

Over-riding goal: Ensure exemplary schools for our children 

Working Goal: Focus on on-going improvement of teaching and learning to ensure continued student 

progress 
Goal 1: Base all decisions under the basic assumption that each child is a constant learner 
Goal 2: Strive towards exemplary schools in areas of curriculum, instruction, assessment, professional 

development and support services 
Goal 3: Promote positive and productive working relationships among all members of the school 

community 
Goal 4: Commit to developing and maintaining exemplary facilities 
Goal 5: Work with Town officials and the community-at-large to implement strategic School/Town 

planning that results in exemplary schools 

In accordance with the Interest Based Bargaining process agreed upon by the School Committee and 
the Andover Education Association the parties established sub-committees and held meetings in the spring and 
fall to work on items that required substantial time to resolve. The sub-committees reported back to the larger 
group in spring 2002 and in fall 2002. 

The School Committee held its annual Retreat in the summer 2002 and discussed items of particular 
concern as a result of budget reductions. These items include: 

■ Increasing challenge to provide a quality education to Andover students 

■ Escalating Special Education costs that siphon off funds for regular education 

■ Inability of Andover High School to guarantee 7.5 credits to every student each year 

■ Growing student enrollment, especially at the high school, and decreasing administrative and teaching staff 

■ Increasing state and federal unfunded mandates, including the new No Child Left Behind Legislation 

■ Increasing number of fee-based programs/activities, with the concern that some families will not be able to 
pay for them 

Assistant Superintendent - Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Professional Development 

Teaching and learning is the core of what we do in schools. Providing a high quality curriculum 
program and a wide range of teaching strategies to reach all learners is the priority. We continue to strive to 
improve learning opportunities for all students. Guided by the five year Curriculum Plan for the Andover 
Public Schools, our staff has worked diligently to address and achieve the goals and actions included in year 
three of the five-year plan. 

The curriculum leadership through the subject area curriculum councils, the building level curriculum 
leaders, and teacher leaders in all areas have reviewed, analyzed, and implemented a series of new and revised 
curriculum programs this year. Implementation included teacher-developed curriculum guides and materials 
and teacher-developed evaluation materials based on Andover Schools Curriculum Standards and 
Benchmarks. A new textbook adoption in the amount of $366,000 funded materials in social studies, 
mathematics, English/language arts, science, and foreign languages. 

Andover students participated in local, state, and national testing programs as a measure of their 
learning. Students in grades one through eleven participated in local assessments to evaluate their 
understanding in mathematics, science, and English/language arts. In grades three through eight and in grade 
ten, students took the MCAS (Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System) in different subject areas. 
Our students continue to improve their performance as reported by the MCAS. Andover ranked in the top ten 
districts in Massachusetts in overall performance by all students. This progress is attributable to the diligence 
of students, teachers, and administrators in working to integrate the necessary skills and knowledge that are 
tested into curriculum and instruction during the year. All students in the 2003 graduation class passed the 
MCAS test and will receive Andover High School diplomas. 

In college admission testing, 97% of Andover High School students took the SAT I, college admittance 
examination. One hundred and eighty four students took 324 Advanced Placement examinations. The class of 
2002 had four semi-finalists and sixteen commended students recognized by the National Merit Scholarship 
Program. In total 95% of our students went on to post-secondary education with 88% going on to four-year 
colleges and universities. 

The professional development program continues to support staff in gaining advanced content 
knowledge and expanding instructional strategies to enhance their work in the classroom. Staff participated in 
curriculum development projects, took part in curriculum councils, and worked to enhance their individual 
professional development plans throughout the year. 

The initiatives in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development continue to 
support and advance the coherence and quality of our educational program. Funding support for the work to 



improve our programs is an ongoing challenge. On behalf of the students we teach, the Andover Public School 
professional staff thanks the community for its ongoing support. 
Business Office 

The primary responsibility of the Business Office is the development and oversight of the School 
Department Budget. This includes constructing the annual budget, monitoring expenditures, administering the 
financial provisions of labor contracts, purchasing, preparation of the Five Year Financial Forecast, 
development of the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan and tracking grant awards and disbursements. In 
addition to financial oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities management, system-wide 
technology, student transportation, preparing student population projections, school and district emergency 
management, custodial services and food services. 

* The Annual Five Year Capital Improvement Plan was updated to reflect the current and projected needs of 
the School Department. In conjunction with building principals and the Department of Plant and Facilities, 
priorities were set and cost estimates established. The Plan was submitted to the Town Manager in September 
to be included in the town's annual Capital Improvement Program for fiscal year 2003. 

* The Information Systems (IS) Department continued to provide training for administrators and support 
staff at the ten schools in the use of student management software. The IS Department also continued to 
implement special needs software at all schools, which included installing new hardware and software and 
training users to create Individual Education Plans from remote locations for use by the Pupil Personnel Office. 

* The Five Year Financial Forecast is an important management tool that was updated to reflect anticipated 
costs. 

* Meetings with teachers continued to be held to discuss Retirement Plus. 

* With the anticipated opening of the two new schools, student transportation was adjusted to take into 
account the Redistricting Plan approved by the School Committee. 

Human Resources Office 

As prior annual reports have discussed, the human resource office plays a major role in recruitment, 
benefits administration, labor relations, and training for both the Town and School departments. This year was 
no different as human resource staff continued to provide technical and administrative support to a wide range 
of managers and employees throughout the system. Notable hires include: Ms. Marcia O'Neil, the Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools; Mr. Randy Pikersgill, the Superintendent of Parks and Grounds; and Mr. Ralph 
Knight, Superintendent of HVAC and Mechanical. 

However, the volume of work in all areas presented a growing challenge, particularly in light of the 
absence of Stephen Fields, our human resource generalist, who was called to active duty on September 11,2001. 
Because we are a small staff, this circumstance provided all of us the opportunity to become more familiar with 
each other's responsibilities. As a result, we are all thoroughly cross-trained. We have also continued to work 
diligently to improve internal processes within the department. Kristin Brown, our HRIS coordinator, has 
made great progress in making more computerized data easily accessible so that we can better monitor human 
resource related activities in various employee groups. We continue to work toward improving our web page 
and exploring alternative website resources to offset the high cost of print advertisements. 

Despite much effort, however, the complexity and sheer volume of work stressed our resources to the 
breaking point. Not only are we missing a staff person, but also we have experienced a decade of significant 
growth. Our employee base has grown from approximately 800 employees to over 1220. These factors have 
combined to minimize our progress toward effectively servicing employees. After careful analysis, we 
determined that some minimal investment in our internal structure was necessary if we were going to do better. 
For this reason, we will add another generalist to our staff. With the return of Mr. Fields this fall, we should be 
well on the way to recovery. Our goal is to strive to be proactive in addressing the growing needs of employees 
and managers so that all work may be accomplished at the highest level of efficiency and effectiveness 
throughout the organization. 

School Reports: 

Andover High School 
Foreign Language Department 

The Foreign Language Department maintained enrollment in German, French, and Spanish, while 
offering additional sections of Latin, including AP, and American Sign Language, taught by a deaf instructor. 
New Spanish textbooks were adopted in 2002 -2003 to provide a better continuum between levels. The 
department continued to create more departmental tools of assessment. Several members of the staff pursued 
further educational degrees and others continued to perfect their language skills through travel experiences. 
The Mathematics Department 

The Mathematics Department implemented SLnew course for our level three students called Integrated 
Mathematics IV. After successful implementation or Integrated I, II and III we developed a fourth course in 



the sequence. This course helped students gain a strong foundation in algebra II concepts in some pre-calculus 
concepts by using a hands-on integrated approach. This year we implemented a new course in the 
programming language Java. This course helped students get ready for a new Advanced Placement course in 
Computer Science that will begin next year. In February, one hundred and forty Enriched Mathematics 
students competed in the American Mathematics Competition. 
The Science Department 

Through a PAC grant the science department purchased a classroom set of books for the physical 
science classes, including the physics of baseball and the physics of music. The ninth grade science program 
obtained a second digital camera, through a PAC grant, for the environmental project. A Corbett grant 
enabled the ninth grade program to purchase materials for the new Waves and Motion unit. A weather station 
was purchased through a Corbett grant. Also, a member of the science department donated a seismograph. 
These two pieces of equipment helped give the ninth grade students a hands-on experience. 
Social Studies 

The Social Studies Department continued to revise curricula in line with Massachusetts State 
Frameworks and to respond to the needs and interests of our students. In the summer of 2002, members of the 
department restructured curricula for Democracy and Media Literacy and Economics, new course offerings 
piloted the previous year, as well as developed instructional materials for Psychology, Advanced Placement U.S. 
History and Economics. Members of the department received training in media literacy through the Harvard 
University School of Education and the Schorenstein Center. The department also developed common files and 
network resources for curriculum development. In coordination with the Andover Senior Center, AHS Social 
Studies students participated in the Veterans History Project, a Library of Congress program designed to 
document the experiences of local war veterans. 
English 

The English Department continued to refine its new curricula for grade 9, now in its third year, and 
grade 10, now in its second year. Two new electives were piloted this year, Contemporary Literature and 
Dramatic Literature. In the summer of 2002, department members developed curricula, evaluated materials 
and ordered texts for these new electives. The department revised curricula and developed common files for 
several other electives, including Dominant Ideas, Masterpieces of British Literature and AP English Literature 
and Composition. In the current school year, two members of the department conducted in-service training for 
incorporating music, art and drama techniques into the regular classroom. Supported by a state grant, 
members of the department also developed a new after-school program for MCAS remediation. 
Counseling Department 

The Counseling Department underwent numerous changes this year. It was our privilege to welcome Aixa de 
Kelley, the new Program Advisor, as well as Lauri Carrick and Michael Wartman, Guidance Counselors who 
transferred in from the Middle Schools. Another addition to our team was Cleo Thompson who assumed the 
position of Options Coordinator. Her role is to support at-risk students; currently she has 27 students on her 
caseload. However, due to cuts in the Massachusetts State Health Grant, we lost our Social Worker, Toni 
Kirby. As a result the group counseling programs have been reduced to a New Student Group and a Grief 
Counseling Group. New this year is the Job Shadowing Opportunity Program for sophomores. The Peer 
Mediation program trained 35 mediators this fall. Early admission results included acceptances from Bates 
College, Boston College, Colgate College, Cornell University, Georgetown University, George Washington 
University, Tufts University and the University of Michigan. 

Doherty Middle School 

Because of budgetary constraints in 2002, Doherty had to be creative in several areas, the most 
challenging being the continuation of our large program of extra-curricular activities at the end of the 
scheduled school day, which serviced over 90% of the student population. Parents supported our request of a 
fee up front which allowed a child to join any or all of the many activities offered. It was especially gratifying to 
note that in many cases even parents of students not wishing to participate in anything paid the fee nonetheless, 
thus enabling the school to pay for those students who could not afford the fee. 

Doherty continued to explore the options within the area of grants in order to enrich the curriculum in 
ways that could not be afforded otherwise. A continuation of the Corbett grant to fund a traveling planetarium 
added considerably to science. A new grant for MCAS remedial math for all the middle schools paved the way 
to better test scores for eligible 6th graders. A grant for an improved weather station will involve many 
students in the future in a further appreciation of meteorology. It is intended that now and in the future, 
Doherty will research and avail itself of many more grants in various areas. 

Doherty also continued in many ways to enhance interaction with parents. More teams took advantage 
of the Doherty web site to post homework and pertinent announcements, and that parents favorably viewed. 
Parents were encouraged to be viable members of the school community and, as a consequence, volunteered in 
many areas. Examples included speaking at Career Day, monitoring the library after school, bringing their 
experiences to specific teams, serving on interview committees, and helping with fund raising drives. 



Lastly, Doherty proceeded as always with an eye on the basic middle school philosophy. We are very 
aware of the necessity to strive constantly to identify the social and emotional needs of our students, but most 
importantly, to aid one and all to achieve academic success. It is to the sizable credit of the entire staff that this 
was so achievable in the past and continues strongly in the present. 

West Middle School 

West Middle School focused in 2002 on transition and the combination of two middle schools into one. 
With the redistricting as our first task, we feel did a great job as a team of staff, parents and students. Our 
communication areas have opened wide and we were particularly proud of the transition process. The West 
also focused on technology and the use of email within the building as well as a communication tool with 
parents and students regarding their assignments. Just about every teacher at West now is available on 
schoolnotes.com to provide all students with updated homework and projects. The Bridge of Kindness, 
community service program remained alive and well. Students who pledged and completed five hours of 
community service have their names posted on a rainbow painted by students. Through this worthwhile 
project, students experienced the joy of giving back to the community. We had a peer-mentoring program with 
the West Elementary School, which allowed middle school students to engage every Wednesday with 
elementary students for learning and fun. The climate and culture of the West Middle School continued to 
grow and embrace diversity, equality and community service, and each initiative went forward with these three 
concepts in mind. 

Wood Hill Middle School 

The Wood Hill Middle School opened in September of 2002 to the delight of a brand new school 
community. Planning for this grand accomplishment was undertaken and supported by many people. Town 
and school personnel worked closely before and during the construction process. Parents assumed an active 
role early on with the formulation of a transition team. This key group helped to allay anxieties, heighten 
excitement and create an atmosphere of impending celebration. 

Wood Hill is predominately staffed with teachers from the Andover Public Schools. Our challenge in 
building a new team was to recognize the different philosophies, values and experiences that each member 
brings to the mix. The gift of time was not an option for our planning. Therefore we have had to be creative in 
providing the foundation for our collaborations. As this school year draws to a close, we are confident that 
Wood Hill School offers a safe and positive environment. Individual contributions are valued. We are a 
community of learners. 

Bancroft Elementary School 

Our school atmosphere is such that all students are called upon to be trustworthy, kind, honest and 
fair. We work with students to be respectful of oneself, of property and of all school community members. As 
students assume an even greater responsibility for their studies and their lives, they develop the natural pride 
and self-confidence that comes with these accomplishments. Because of this, Bancroft is home to the "Gold 
T.I.E.S. Program." The acronym T.I.E.S. stands for "Thinking, Improving, Excelling and Succeeding." The 
goal of the Gold T.I.E.S. Program is to recognize students who have demonstrated critical thinking skills or 
have improved, excelled or succeeded at any level within the school. Other new and continued initiatives this 
year include: 

• Improving upon the safety and security procedures of our school. Many steps have been taken, 
including the development a new visitor policy and a new evacuation plan, to improve the overall safety and 
security of our school. 

• Expansion of our A.J.A.S. (Alliance of Juniors And Seniors) Program. The expansion of this program 
is being developed in conjunction with our school theme of "Growing and Learning Together." Our 
partnership with the Senior Center has enabled many dynamic relationships to grow between our students and 
our senior friends. 

The implementation of mobile laptops carts at the 4 th and 5 th grade level. Teachers in both of these 
grades have been integrating the laptop computers into their daily lessons. From performing research on the 
World Wide Web, to creating PowerPoint presentations, the teachers are quickly learning that the laptop 
computer is another tool to add to their teaching repertoires. 

High Plain Elementary School 

"New Faces, New Places, New Teams, New Dreams," the guiding spirit behind and a particularly 
appropriate theme for the September, 2002 opening of Andover's newest elementary school, High Plain. After 
more than three years of intensive planning, design, and construction efforts to prepare the site and complete 
the building, 2002 was also devoted to establishing a new school community of students, parents, and staff 
sharing a common dream. In the Fall of 2001, ^Transition Team made up of parents, teachers and 



administrators began the process of creating a new family of friends and colleagues. 546 students redistricted 
from three elementary schools, and 82 professional staff reassigned from five different schools throughout the 
district joined together to create this new team. A variety of programs were scheduled to support a smooth 
transition. Newsletters, parent coffees, student information meetings, pen pal programs, site visits, suggestion 
boxes, strategic planning workshops for staff and "An Evening Celebration of New Sites and Sounds" were all 
part of the process. The creative musical genius of Regina Stein and Martha Giguere combined to write a new 
school song — "Let's Give a High Five for High Plain!" 

Through the collaborative commitment and exhaustive efforts of the School Building Committee, 
Superintendent, School Committee, Town Departments and faculty, the High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill 
Middle Schools opened their doors on schedule to the community for their first open house, Tuesday, 
September 3 rd . Students arrived September 5 th . Teachers completed the daunting task of moving into and 
setting up their classrooms in less than three days! 

Even before opening day, High Plain's parent community established an active PTO and School 
Improvement Council. They have sponsored a full calendar of enrichment programs for students and families 
in addition to hosting a most successful auction to augment future construction of a new playground. 
Academically, High Plain focused staff development and parent outreach programs in the area of Literacy. 
Renowned authors and reading instruction experts Jim Trelease and Brendan Walsh provided training for 
both teachers and parents. The reading specialist, librarian and Title I professionals have combined their 
efforts to establish an effective guided reading support program and leveled book room for students. 

Student Council was established for 4 th and 5 th graders following an electoral process. A school store 
(The Hawk Shop), Earth Watch (recycling team), Community Service Program, School Spirit Committee and 
Student Newspaper are all in place. The shared campus with Wood Hill Middle School has also enabled a 
wonderful opportunity for cross-age teaching and mentoring programs. The "New Faces" of the High Plain 
Community have truly come together as a "New Team" to build "New Dreams" and learning opportunities for 
her students. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Last spring Sanborn staff adopted the school-wide theme, "Science Matters." Teaching teams 
developed a variety of initiatives to enhance our science curriculum. At each grade level, students expanded 
their knowledge through the use of "Science Weekly." Sanborn parents were invited into classrooms to share 
their science expertise in response to parental suggestions from our Needs Assessment to continue to tie the 
curriculum to real life experiences. Our PTO Enrichment Committee contributed $10,000 to schedule science 
related programs in each of our classrooms. 

The Andover Fund for Education awarded the Opticom Science and Technology Grant of $500 and the 
Andover Educational Improvement Association contributed an additional $500 to Sanborn parents Joan 
Broderick and Maria Crockett, Learning Specialist Barbara Bunn and Librarian Suzanne Crowley to fund 
their proposal, "Take Home Science Kits". Our Sanborn team assembled a series of science challenge kits, 
which were matched to the district science "benchmarks" at each grade level. The kits are housed in our library 
where they can be signed out for home use. In March, our Sanborn scientists will share their projects at a 
school-wide "Science Fair." The changing faces of Sanborn include those of the fifty new families who were 
redistricted as a result of the completion of the new schools. 

The changing spaces of Sanborn include Art and Music rooms that we haven't had for a number of 
years, a new Health room and a Staff room that we were able to furnish through the generous donations of 
Sanborn parents. About a year ago, we had our old wooden playground condemned by an inspector hired by 
the town and then razed in a short span of time. Within weeks, a playground committee composed of Debbie 
Begos, Kimberly Taylor, Lauren & Emil Frei, Lisa McDonald and Daryl Arsenault took the lead in playground 
design, raised more than $60,000 and coordinated the necessary equipment and volunteers which resulted in the 
completion of our wonderful new playground. Special thanks to Joe Piantedosi and Ken Parker from the Plant 
and Facilities Department for their guidance, site preparation and for providing 90 cubic yards of play carpet 
for the playground which was constructed over the Columbus Day weekend through the efforts of more than 
100 volunteers from the Sanborn community. 

During the month of December, I received two contributions from Sanborn families totaling $10,000 
that will be used in our continuing effort to upgrade our library collection. Another family has donated a 
complete set of the 2003 World Book Encyclopedia. On behalf of our present and future students, I want to 
thank the citizens of Andover, our Sanborn PTO, our town and school employees, our loyal cadre of volunteers 
and our many private benefactors for your continued support. 

Shawsheen Elementary School 

Shawsheen School saw a lot of changes this past year, with a good amount of the staff leaving with 
Principal Brenda O'Brien to open High Plain Elementary. Teachers, sponsored by our generous PTO, met 
over the summer to plan an integrated curriculum on our school wide theme "Endangered Species." With 



many newly hired staff members, we decided on an overarching theme of The Golden Rule, where all members 
of the Shawsheen Community worked on our three R's: (to be) Respectful, Responsible, Role-Models. The pre- 
school programs continued to grow and thrive, with a waiting list for openings. Our full time kindergarten 
program was very successful and the teachers worked diligently on setting up a reading room for our balanced 
literacy program. Several more teachers attended the in-depth John Collins Writing Course and integrated it 
in their classrooms, while others continued to attend the Balanced Literacy training. 

We also worked on instituting standards-based classrooms. Open Circle continued in most classes and 
we anticipate more training for the new members of the staff. We continued on our quest to be NAEYC 
(National Association for the Education of Young Children) certified; but have decided to attain certification as 
a whole school rather than just for our kindergarten program. Our administrative intern, Amy Bride, 
undertook this huge endeavor, including staff and parent surveys, as her project. Our two Open Houses 
included parents, guests and students, who readily 'show off Shawsheen' and their portfolios of work. We are 
extremely appreciative of the generosity and dedication of our PTO members and parent volunteers, who work 
so hard to make Shawsheen a true community. Not only did the PTO purchase supplies and equipment, but it 
also funded educational programs for our student population. Our young students continued to participate in 
clothing, food, and stuffed animal drives to help others less fortunate. Security measures were instituted at the 
school, with staff wearing photo identification and all visitors signing in at the office to get a badge. Safety 
continues to be a priority at all schools. 

South School 

"Children the Heart of our Community and Country" set the theme for this school year at South 
Elementary School. This theme provided 572 students many opportunities to engage in meaningful learning 
experiences. South has an effective winning climate and community members feel proud and committed to 
education. Our successful year was centered in the tremendous contribution of our parents, teachers, staff 
members, and business partners. Here were some highlights of our school year: 

• A highly involved parent community, which embraced the philosophy of South School. Parents 
volunteered in the classroom, chaperoned field trips, assisted in the selection of cultural enrichment and 
served on teacher interview committees. They helped to procure foundation monies and grants, helped in 
enrichment programs, and served on over 30 PTO committees. 

• A twelfth year partnership with Wyeth Biopharma Company, a leader in biotechnology, through which 
Wyeth Scientists teach hands-on science, "Bacteria Around Us" to all elementary Andover and Lawrence 
fifth graders. 

• Teachers continued to engage in many staff development initiatives to add best teaching practices to their 
repertoire. In 2002 our focus was on designing classroom web pates, using digital cameras, software 
training on Time-liner, Map-maker, and Graph Club. All of our teachers were trained in the Social 
Competency Model; and were involved in benchmark study groups, math study groups, differentiated 
curriculum work, and sharing of best practices. We had an active mentoring program for our new 
teachers. 

• Technology integration continued during the 2002-03 school year at South in all grades and across all 
disciplines. The technology resource teachers worked closely with the classroom teachers to plan units, 
implement lessons, and meet curriculum objectives. Some highlights include: a Kindergarten multimedia 
project entitled "All About Me" which involved drawing, writing, and reinforces letter/sound relationships; 
use of the mobile laptop cart by grades 4 and 5 in science to collect information, analyze data, and 
synthesize their findings; a research project on penguins in which 4 th graders helped 2 nd graders to conduct 
research and write a book presenting their findings; collaborative work between grades K and 5 in which 
5 th graders developed a reading lesson using their laptops and then taught the topic to a Kindergarten 
buddy. 

• South continued to have a long tradition of giving and community involvement. Our students donated to 
food pantries and collected books for countries in need of written materials. Our holiday gift giving and 
donation of winter coats to those in need were other examples. Recycling of all school paper was an 
integral part of our environmental awareness program. Students were active in student government where 
they had a voice in the school through Student Issues, Community Service, and Spirit committees. 

We appreciate and thank the Andover Community for supporting education at South Elementary. 

West Elementary School 

West Elementary School reinvented itself in September of 2002. On September 1, 2001, West 
Elementary had a student population of 843. One year later, our enrollment stood at 603. This reduction in size 
was made possible by the opening of the new High Plain Elementary School. In addition to lower enrollment, 
there were many other changes at West Elementary. As a result of redistricting, students formerly enrolled at 
Sanborn and Bancroft Schools began attending W$sjt Elementary. As we have each year, students from 



Shawsheen Elementary made the transition from grade two there to grade three here. We also had seventy-one 
new kindergarten students. As a result, when West Elementary opened for business in September of 2002, the 
majority of students were new to the school. There were other changes, as well. For the first time in seven years, 
we were able to have an art room. The cafeteria had served in that capacity during that time. All special needs 
students are now taught in appropriate instructional areas. None are instructed in closets or large transition 
spaces, such as the centers of the pods and corridors. 

Our Jump Rope for Heart and Easter Seals Shoot Out again raised thousands of dollars for those two 
causes. The student council collected goods for the People's Pantry and The Community Day Care Program in 
Lawrence. West Elementary's Math Olympiad teams have once again continued its winning ways by once again 
scoring in the top ten percent among teams from all around the globe, including those schools that have sixth 
graders on their teams. Other highlights of the year were: WERAWC-West Elementary Readers and Writers 
Conference, Student Council-Covers grades K-5, Trash detectors-help Keep West Elementary clean and neat, 
School Store-raises money for student activities, Before-School Enrichment Program, Recorder Club, Grade 
4/5 Chorus, Grade 3 Chorus, Chess Club, Destination Imagination, Genetics Institute Science Enrichment 
program. Johns Hopkins Talent Search, and Buddies-Upper grade classes paired with primary classes. Finally, 
the first phase of the West Elementary Asbestos Abatement Project was completed. The cafeteria was given a 
complete makeover. Asbestos-containing floor and ceiling tiles were removed. New floor tiles, new ceiling tiles, 
new heating vents, and all new lighting was installed. The second phase of the project is scheduled for the 
summer of 2003. 

School District Department Reports: 

Pupil Personnel Department 

The Pupil Personnel Administration continued to oversee the provision of special education services to 
over 800 students, between the ages of 3 and 22, who are identified as educationally disabled. Programs were 
available to address a broad spectrum of needs from mild to moderate learning disabilities to severe, multiple 
handicaps. The goal of special education was to provide these students with the necessary strategies and skills so 
that they were able to function as independent and contributing members of their school and community. To 
the extent possible, special education students attended their neighborhood school and participated with their 
typically developing peers in the general education setting. In 2002 additional services were provided at the 
West Elementary School for a small group of kindergarten and first grade students with Pervasive 
Developmental Delays (PDD) and the alternative high school program (the MIX) was expanded in order to 
provide for additional students. Both new resources reflected the continuing trends of a rising incidence in 
students with impairments on the autism spectrum and increasing numbers of adolescent students experiencing 
psychiatric and mental health disorders. Pupil Personnel continued its efforts to improve the capacity of the 
Andover Public Schools to be responsive to the needs of an increasingly diverse student population so that 
referrals of students to out of district programs could be avoided and students already placed in such programs 
could be successfully returned to their home schools. 

Health Education Department 

Andover's K-12 Health Education Program implements a comprehensive sequential Health Education 
curriculum which reinforces the dynamic relationship between optimal health, physical, mental and 
environmental well being; fosters increased tolerance and understanding toward individual differences; and 
develops interpersonal communication, coping, refusal, and decision making skills. Andover has developed and 
implemented a data-driven, standards based comprehensive school health program that helps students acquire 
the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors for them to attain well-being. Andover Health Education teachers 
spent countless hours laboring on aligning the framework, developing a scope and sequence, and designing 
lessons that provides challenging standards for Andover's children and young adults. Based on scholarship, 
sound research, and effective practices the framework enables teachers to provide learning standards for all 
students. 

This past year Andover's Health Education Teachers have worked diligently to institute and coordinate 
CCSSO/SCASS Assessments into the curriculum. Student competency assessments are utilized in grades one 
through twelve to measure student achievement in the areas of knowledge, values, and behaviors. Built into 
each grade are scoring rubrics. The YRBS Survey is administered annually to all grades 6-12 students to 
measure student's participation in risky behaviors. Andover's students report lower than the Massachusetts 
state average in every category and survey question. Andover addresses its comprehensive Health Education 
with a special emphasis on community linkages. Community Network Teams such as The Community Health 
Advisory Team, Parent to Parent, Andover C.A.R.E.S. and Andover's Youth Council meet to build safe schools 
and communities. The student's needs and interests are supported in many ways by a number of student 
organizations and clubs in the Andover Public Schools. GUTS - Growing Up Taking A Stand, SADD - Students 
Against Destructive Decisions, Peer Leadership, Kids For Kids, Gay/Straight Alliance, GLAM - Girls Leaders 



Advocates & Mentors, BLAM - Boys Leaders Advocates & Mentors, and Project Teamwork all have a strong 
presence in our schools and community. These leadership groups promote advocacy and support for our young 
people. 

Fine and Performine Arts Department 

Three hundred and sixty-seven students Grades 3-12 pursued instrumental study. Instrumental and vocal 
students continued to participate through the audition process for district and state ensembles, and earned the 
following awards: 

■ Three AHS students All-State 3 vocal 

■ Two AHS students - All-Eastern 2 vocal 

■ Eleven students Senior District 7 vocal, 4 instrumental 

■ Twenty-one students Junior District 12 vocal, 9 instrumental 
Visual Arts: 

Andover High School student artwork was submitted to The Boston Globe and earned the following awards: 

■ 1 Silver Key 

■ 1 Gold Key 

■ 4 Honorable Mentions 

■ 2 AHS students were accepted to Art All-State 
Dramatic Arts: 

Andover High School again hosted the first round of the Northeast Regional One-Act Theatre Competition. 
Eight high schools participated. Andover High School's entry was a humorous contemporary play by David 
Ives called "Seven Menus". The AHS musical production this year "Les Miserables" met with rave reviews. 
Easily this was the most challenging production in the history of AHS musicals. 

Technology Department 

The Andover Public School Technology Program continues integrating technology into the classroom 
environment using computer technology as tool to enhance and enrich the education experience for all its 
students. High Plain Elementary School and Wood Hill Middle School added 543 state-of-the-art computers 
and printer to the district's inventory. Every classroom is equipped with networked computers, laser printers, 
and wireless access technology. Mobile wireless computer labs, 32" TV/VGA monitors, and VCRs are also part 
of the classroom. In addition, each teacher has been provided a wireless laptop computer with CD-RW/DVD 
combo drives. These laptops will be used by the teachers at school and at home, enhancing their training and 
classroom-learning environment. The cable television institutional system was extended to the new schools to 
provide a connection to the town-wide private broadband data/video system. 

The Andover High School Applied Technology Department computer Graphics Lab and the Fine Arts 
Computer Arts lab were upgraded from seven-year-old Macintosh computers to new Compaq Evo 1.7 GHz 
computers with the latest software. The Mathematics classroom's Pentium 133 MHz computers were upgraded 
with repurposed VYL 450 MHz computers from the Town offices. The High School also initiated a Learning 
Center in the Library workroom. Five PII repurposed computers from the Town offices were installed in the 
new Learning Center. 

As redistricting was implemented, a redistribution of technology was undertaken to equalize 
technology between all schools. We also continued to expand the student purchased laptop pilot program. 
South Elementary School expanded on last year's program from two fourth and one fifth grade laptop 
classroom to this year's two fourth grade and two fifth grade laptop classrooms. In addition, West Elementary 
School has initiated its own successful student purchased laptop program. The laptop program has proven to 
be a tremendous asset to the learning environment. The updating of computer equipment continued at Doherty 
and West Middle Schools as 15 additional classroom teachers were provided laptop computers. These mobile 
computers, some repurposed, some new, are being used to replace the aging Macintosh 5500 computers that are 
currently installed in middle school classrooms. 

Physical Education Department 

The Physical Education Department had several highlights this past year. Carol Martini was selected 
as the AAHPERD national high school teacher of the year and has been presenting segments of Andover's 
curriculum at conventions throughout the country. David Fazio was selected as the AAHPERD eastern district 
high school teacher of the year and is a finalist for this year's national teacher of the year. The elementary 
program was selected as the MAHPERD state program of the year. Six teachers have been selected to present 
sessions at the state MAHPERD convention. The middle school curriculum was revised and updated. 
Andover's students continue to score very well in the President's Challenge Physical Fitness Test. Over two 
hundred fourth and fifth graders participated in the annual one-mile cross-country run. More than five 
hundred fourth and fifth grade students participated vMhe annual spring track and field meet. 



Athletics Department 

The Athletic Department saw many changes during the last school year. The highlights included girls' 
lacrosse and girls' ice hockey becoming varsity sports and qualifying for state tournament competition. User 
fees were initiated for the first time in over twenty years to offset a $150,000 reduction in the Athletic budget. 
Participation continued at an all time high level, the Boston Globe ranked the Andover athletic program in the 
top five programs. The Boston Globe ranks programs for both boys and girls' sports combined. Mr. Hurley, 
the Athletic Director for the past sixteen years announced his retirement effective August 31, 2003 for health 
reasons. The girls' swim team achieved an unprecedented fourth consecutive State Division I championship 
season under head coach Marilyn Fitzgerald. 



85 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



The Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution 
serving the communities of Andover, Lawrence, North Andover and Methuen. The student body 
is comprised of approximately 1,400 students, nine of whom are residents of Andover. One 
hundred and two co-op students have been placed in business and industry to date. The $51M 
building expansion project that will add 91,000 sq. ft. of laboratory and classroom space to 
GLTS is proceeding well and close to schedule. 

The Greater Lawrence Technical School has taken major steps towards meeting the 
challenges of the Education Reform mandates and has adopted the High Schools That Work 
Model. The career and technical education programs continue to build upon student career 
preparedness through a restructured cluster model that integrate interdisciplinary, competency 
and inquiry based curriculum into four career clusters or academies. 

The school's four career academies are: Advanced Technology, Business 
Communications, Construction and Service. A Freshman Academy is designed for all freshmen 
students to explore the various majors before full time academic commitment. The majors 
offered at Greater Lawrence include: Allied Health, Autobody, Automotive, 

CAD/Machine/Drafting, Carpentry, Construction & Building/Painting, Cosmetology, Culinary 
Arts, Electronics Technology, Food Technology, Graphic Communications, Marketing 
Education, Metal Fabrication, Office Technology, Plumbing/HVAC and Telecommunications. 

It is essential to the education program of the Greater Lawrence Technical School that 
students participate in service to their communities. Each year the member communities and 
non-profit organizations that serve the Greater Lawrence area submit requests for consideration. 
These requests may be for services or projects that will have educational value for the students 
who complete them. The following Community Service Projects are scheduled for the current 
school year. Additional projects will be added as submitted and approved. 



ACT/Heather Drive House Building Project 

Print tickets for Andover Football Boosters Club 

Print flyers for the Andover SEP AC 

"Taste of Andover" Food & Service 

Luncheon for Shawsheen Women's Club 

Four dozen danish for High Plain Elementary School PTO 

Andover Historical Society Gingerbread House 

Pastry for Andover Public School-wide PTO 

Print posters and tickets for "A Better Chance" 

Donations to Andover Youth Center Fundraiser 



Andover: 






9/17/02- 


■ $40.00 


1 1/22/02 


■ $450.00 


12/3/02 - 


. $3,500.00 


1 1/2/02 - 


. $200.00 


11/14/02 


■ $12.00 


12/6/02 - 


■ $75.00 


12/6/02 - 


. $35.00 


12/9/02 - 


■ $200.00 


2/11/03- 


• $225.00 


1/27/03 - 



86 



ANDOVER COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

The mission of the Andover Commission on Disabilities is to address Andover's needs for 
the Town, its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. 



The Andover Commission on Disabilities is a commission of nine volunteers serving 
three-year terms and appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability-related 
issues. The majority (5) of the commission members must be disabled or directly related to 
disability. The goals of the Commission are as follows: 

To advocate for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in the Town 

of Andover. 

To research the needs and problems of people with disabilities in the Town of Andover. 

To advise and assist Town officials and employees in addressing the needs of people with 

disabilities. 

To provide information, referral, guidance and technical assistance to individuals, public 

agencies, businesses and organizations in matters pertaining to disability. 

To participate to the maximum extent possible in disability-related programs of a local, 

regional, State and Federal nature. 

To support training related to disability to people who reside or work in the Town of 

Andover. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

The year 2002 was an exciting one for the Commission. A transition was made to a new 
Chairperson and three new Commission members were recruited. The Commission's focus 
continues to be on increasing access. Projects were reassessed and prioritized into a Strategic 
Plan with Project Team Leaders assigned for each project. Areas of concentration during the 
year were: 

1. Developing a new Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition Plan for the 
schools. 

2. Reviewing the new elementary and middle schools and the Police Station for ADA 
conformance. 

3. Reviewing, prioritizing and advocating curb cuts and sidewalks for wheelchair access. 

4. Revitalizing the Handicap Parking Ticketing Program in collaboration with the Police 
Department. 

5. Planning for Americans with Disabilities (ADA) training for Town employees. 

6. Increased collaboration and liaison with the Senior Center. 

7. Building a collaboration with the Massachusetts Office on Disability and increasing the 
Commission's capacity for individual advocacy. 

8. ADA monitoring of the Main Street Project and ADA Transportation. 

9. Sponsoring disabled artists at the Andovers Artists' Guild Art Show. 



87 



SUMMARY OF PROJECTS 

ADA Monitoring of Schools 

Completed the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Accessibility Review Self- Assessment of 
all Andover schools with the exception of the Bancroft School and Shawsheen School that were 
deemed too old for major renovations. The schools reviewed were: 

Andover High School West Middle School 

Doherty Middle School Sanborn School 

South School West Elementary School 

Wood Hill Middle School* High Plain Elementary School* 

* Created punch list for architects and planners 

The Northeast Independent Living Program, Inc. (NILP) completed a sub-contract for the 
basic data and provided the Commission with the framework for the required Transition Plan for 
the Schools. This provided a quality audit against the latest ADA specs and the report is being 
used as an ADA Training experience for the Commission and other interested Town employees. 
The Town's ADA Coordinator, the ADA Action Team and the Andover Commission on 
Disability have plans in place to use these reports for completion of the required Revised 
Transition Plan for Andover schools. 

ADA Monitoring of Town Buildings 

Shortly after the occupancy by the Police Department in new Public Safety Center, 
members of the Commission toured the facility to check for compliance with specifications of 
the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the State Architectural Access Board (AAB). 
The Commission again benefited from the expertise of professional reviewers from the Northeast 
Independent Living Program, Inc. who had been subcontracted by the Commission for a formal 
report. The review group was favorably impressed with the efforts of the Chief of Police and the 
architects to assure that the building was in compliance. Because of the timeliness of the review, 
the findings could be incorporated in the "punch list" of items to be completed within the 
construction project timelines. 

Curb Cut/Sidewalk Project 

The ACOD has consistently maintained "access" as an important part of its mission. In 
1999, the ACOD set as its priority the review of sidewalks and curbs prohibiting access to the 
main streets and services of Andover center. This was completed to assist the Main Street 
Project which was waiting State funding and to assure that the area was as functional as it was 
aesthetically pleasing. In this study, however, serious barriers and sections of disrepair were 
noted. They were prioritized and submitted to the Department of Public Works for correction 
through its maintenance funding. 



88 



Throughout the year the Commission lobbied for the completion of repairs to the priority 
listings of the original study, i.e., sites needing repair beyond the scope of the Main Street Project 
or unable to be postponed several years waiting for project funding. Curb cuts were initiated in 
many designated locations as well as grading and resurfacing of impassible walkways. Some of 
the most prominent include the brick sidewalk to the gazebo at The Park in order for the disabled 
to easily access functions there. Complimentarily, the crosswalks leading to The Park were made 
wheelchair/walker accessible. Improvements are also noteworthy in other areas of Bartlet Street, 
on Essex Street in front of the St. Augustine's Church, Shawsheen Street and on the walkways 
over the Railway Bridge and the two Shawsheen bridges. Lampposts centered on sidewalks 
have also been removed. This on-going sub-committee of the Commission receives complaints 
from the citizens of Andover and advocates for suitable accommodation from the Department of 
Public Works which allows us to designate 25% of its maintenance budget. 

Handicap Parking Ticketing Program 

In response to a growing concern over misuse of handicapped parking spaces and other 
areas specifically designated for handicapped access, the ACOD entered into a partnership, 
approved by the Board of Selectmen, with the Andover Police Department to have certain 
Commission members authorized to enforce these parking privileges. Using instant cameras to 
document violations, the trained volunteers issue affidavits when vehicles are parked in violation 
of Town By-Laws. The Police Department's Parking Control Officer then mails copies of this 
evidence with a parking ticket of $100.00 to the violator. Initially, ticketing results were 
minimal due the infrequency of the designated volunteers coming into Town. In December of 
2002, five new volunteers were trained with the goal that through the use of public education, the 
Town can achieve one hundred percent compliance with handicapped parking laws. This sub- 
committee is currently reviewing legal compliance with numbers, dimensions, locations and 
signage of handicapped parking near public buildings. 

Training Programs 

Americans with Disabilities (ADA) training will be available to Town employees in 
January/February of 2003. Two sessions will be offered covering topics such as employment of 
persons with disabilities and what reasonable accommodation really means. Accessibility issues 
including public buildings, business inspections and curb cuts will also be studied. The first 
session will be offered to 20 to 25 people. Targeted employees include special education 
teachers, administrators and supervisory personnel from all Town departments. A second 
training session is also planned for those Town employees who may have direct contact with 
people who have disabilities. This group includes tradesmen, building and site inspectors and 
Department of Public Works staff. The training would include the above topics plus fieldwork 
and will be offered to ten to fifteen Town employees. The Commission has worked in 
conjunction with the Town's Human Resources Director to ensure that the programs will meet 
the needs of all Town employees. Michael Meuhe, the Executive Director/ ADA Coordinator of 
the Cambridge Commission for Persons with Disabilities, will lead the training programs. 



89 



Senior Center 

A member of the Commission is assigned to the Senior Center to inform and advocate on 
relevant issues such as access, mobility, transportation, services, etc., specifically as they impact 
our older residents. Regular drop-ins at the Senior Center as well as meetings with staff have led 
to supportive efforts on Senior Center projects. 

Collaboration with the Massachusetts Office on Disability/ Advocacy 

The ACOD works closely with the Massachusetts Office on Disability and the Northeast 
Independent Living Program, Inc. to advocate on the issues of individuals. The Commission 
deals with equal rights of access to services, legal assistance, accommodation, employment and 
special circumstances in strict confidentiality and usually in concert with the above-named 
agencies. The Commission has provided individual consultation and advocacy on personal 
disability issues, researching the appropriate resources to handle the specific problem, referring 
the case to appropriate providers and following up on the resolution of the problem. 

As a result of individual advocacy projects, the Commission has developed an excellent 
collaboration with the Massachusetts Office on Disability. In the future, they will provide the 
"Intake" service. Any disabled person in Andover who needs Individual Advocacy can call 
MOD for help at 1-800-322-2020. The person simply asks for "Intake" and defines the problem 
area such as "housing" or "transportation". MOD has professional advocates and other 
personnel in place to handle these issues and formal referral to services. 

Art-in-the-Park 

For the past two years, the ACOD has sponsored disabled artists to the Andovers Artists' 
Guild Art-in-the-Park show in The Park. Artists are outreached through handicapped artists 
organizations in Massachusetts, an invitation is extended and the applicants then submit 
applications and photography of their work. The Commission provides entry fees, luncheon and 
refreshments as the artists have the opportunity to compete and sell their art. Five artists have 
been sponsored each year and this event will continue annually to support opportunities for 
disabled artists and provide increased venues for their work. 

The Main Street Project 

From the time it was first proposed, the Main Street Project has been closely followed by 
members of the Disability Commission. The Commission received assurances from the architect 
that their 1 999 study of sidewalks and curb cuts would be included in full compliance with ADA 
specifications. To further support this Town improvement project, a photographic study of all 
the thresholds of Main Street merchants was completed clearly indicating the physical barriers to 
disabled customers. The Commission will continue to advocate and educate for changes in this 
area which is in the private sector and not covered in the project funding. 



90 



Transportation 

For five years the Commission has monitored the activities of the MVRTA and frequently 
recommended steps and reported problems to the MVRTA as well as Town officials. Commission 
members have attended and spoken at various meetings, such as the hearing of anticipated service 
cuts for Andover due to State budget cuts. As of Oct. 28, 2002, the Andover/Ballardvale bus route 
22 was eliminated and replaced by Ring and Ride, a new curb-to-curb, shared ride service serving 
portions of the former Route 22. 

Check the Commission's Web Site for more information 

The Andover Commission On Disabilities' Web Site is integrated into the Town's Web 
site http://www.town.andover.ma.us and is just a click away from the home page. It is kept up to 
date with the latest membership, frequently asked questions and relevant links. A telephone line 
is also maintained at 978-623-8335 where requests can be made and a Commission member will 
respond. 



91 



ANDOVER PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources and has been active in 
the following areas 



Demolition Delay Bylaw: 

The Commission heard demolition requests for five properties. Four properties were 
given delays of two to six months. One request was declined as an inappropriate application. 
Eighteen applications were reviewed for historic appropriateness. Seven buildings, including two 
reviewed in 2002, were demolished this year. Two buildings await demolition. Two buildings 
were moved to new locations. 

Local Historic Districts: 



The Ballardvale Local Historic District Commission (BHLDC) continues it's work in 
hearing proposals and advising residents about the design of historically sensitive changes to 
buildings in the District. The Preservation Commission and the BHLDC work cooperatively on 
issues of mutual interest. 

Heritage Education: 

The 12 th Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held in May at the Memorial Hall 
Library in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society to recognize outstanding examples of 
historic preservation in the community. Eleven property owners were recognized for their 
efforts. 

Other Projects of Note: 

The early 19 th century Stephen Abbot House was moved from 45 Ballardvale Road to 373 
South Main Street. An historic West Andover barn was disassembled, relocated to 60 
Chestnut Street and rebuilt. 

With demand for housing at a high level and limited available land, demolition of moderately 
priced small houses is increasingly common. The "mansionization" phenomenon continues 
to occur in Andover on a parcel-by-parcel basis and poses a serious threat to historic 
residential neighborhoods. The Town does not currently have a means of addressing the size 
of house-to-lot size to keep a newly constructed house in conformity with its surrounding 
neighborhood. The Preservation Commission is committed to working to develop zoning by- 
laws that address this phenomenon. 

The Preservation Commission and Planning Board has worked together to bring a 
Dimensional Special Permit for Historic Preservation warrant article to the 2003 Town 
Meeting. The Commission also intends to submit an amendment to the Demolition Delay 
Bylaw to increase the delay period from six to twelve months. 

92 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-four (24) cases, disbursing 
$32,995.39 on approved cases. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the 
Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the 
Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2001 $141,149.40 

Receipts - 2002 26,082.84 

$167,232.24 
Disbursements - 2002 32,995.39 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2002 $134,236.85 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved one application during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/01 $47,21 1 .95 

Income - FY-2002 2,453.16 

Expenditures - FY-2002 

Balance as of 6/30/01 $49,665.1 1 



93 



ANDQVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. The monthly meetings of 
the Board of Commissioners are held on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court 
Community Room located at 100 Morton Street with the exception of the January, May and 
October meetings which are held in the Frye Circle Community Room located at 256 North 
Main Street. The Housing Authority Board Members and Executive Director are as follows: 

Ronald C. Hajj - Chairman Norma Villerreal - Vice Chair 
James Cuticchia - Treasurer Francis O'Connor - Assistant Treasurer 
Calvin A. Deyermond - Governor's Appointee 
Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Executive Director 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of state-aided housing for 
elder/disabled people on Chestnut Court, Grandview Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court. 
There are 56 units of family housing on Memorial Circle. The AHA has seven leased housing 
units under the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program and owns one house under the 
Massachusetts Chapter 689 program. 

STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: Income Limits 

1 person $37,750 4 people $53,900 7 people $66,850 

2 people $43,150 5 people $58,250 8 people $71,150 

3 people $48,550 6 people $62,550 

Apartment Turnover 2002: 35 Elder/Disabled Units 6 Family Units 

Average Rent: $262 Elder/Disabled Program $313 Family Program 

STATE- FUNDED MODERNIZATION GRANTS 

Memorial Circle - Basement Drainage Project - estimated cost $250,000 
Frye Circle - awarded planning grant - $42,825 

STATE FUNDED GRANT - $50,000 

New Horizons for Youth Program - An after school homework program for Memorial Circle 
children funded through the Andover Police Department under the Edward Byrne Memorial 
State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program. 

STATE/AHA RENT ESCROW PROGRAM 

Seven participants to date. Escrow program that allows Memorial Circle Tenants to escrow 
partial rent payments specifically to transition out of Public Housing. 

FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAM 

The AHA administers 127 Section 8 Vouchers through HUD. Income limits are as follows: 

1 person $23,600 4 people $33,700 7 People $41,800 

2 people $26,950 5 people $36,400 8 People $44,500 

3 People $30,350 6 people $39,100 

FEDERAL GRANTS RECEIVED 

. Family Self Sufficiency Coordinator - $45,000 

Family Self Sufficiency Program - 25 slots allotted. Participants execute contracts for goal- 
setting and life skills to effect self sufficiency while escrowing funds monthly. 

94 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2002 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



Money Market Fund 
Securities @ Book 
Res for Cost/Mkt. 



1/1/02 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



$1,612.00 -Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities 
277,525.45 -Transfers from Reserve Fund 
(61 ,856.43) - Adj to lower of Cost/Market 
- Investment Counsel Fees 



12/31/02 



($34,628.17) Money Market Fund $10,700.51 

1,168.12 Securities @ Book 233,892.89 

8,994.48 Res.for Cost/Mkt. (52,861.95) 
(1,084.00) 



$217,28102 



Decrease 



($25,549.57) 



$191,731.45 



Savings Account 
Checking Account 
Money Market Fund 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 
(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



$6,879 47 Dividends Received 
2,17111 Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 
12,716.26 Interest Recerved-Other 



$21,766 84 



Income Total 



$10,106.93 Savings Account $7,244.41 

725.00 Checking Account 6,008.55 

646.67 Money Market Fund 3,744.41 



11,478 60 



$16,997.37 



EXPENSES 



Andover High School Projects 
Misc.Operating Expenses 

Expense Total 

Net Gain/(Loss) 

TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 

-1 0% of Income (1 /1 - 1 2/31 /02) 
-Unexpended School Proj. Funds 

Decrease 



$14,205.44 
87451 

15,079.95 

(3,601 .35) 



1,148.00 

20.12(7/1/01 -6/30/02) 



($4,769.47) 



$239,047.86 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$208,728.82 



95 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2002 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

Money Market Fund 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 
300 Shs Allstate Corp. 
500 Shs. Atmos Energy Corp. 
700 Shs. Delphi Automotive Sys. Corp. 
300 Shs Diebotd, Inc. 
300 Shs. EOG Resources, Inc. 
300 Shs. Honeywell Intl. Inc. 
200 Shs. KJmberty Clark Corp. 
600 Shs. Perkinelmer, Inc. 
500 Shs Questar Corp. 
300 Shs. Schering Plough Corp. 
200 Shs. Verizon Communications 

8,247.417 Shs. Federated High Income Bond Fund.CI.B 
2,049.459 Shs Pioneer High Yield Fund.CI.B 

TOTAL STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 



BOOK VALUE 



MARKET VALUE 



MARKET VALUE 
OVER/(UNDER) 
BOOK VALUE 



TOTAL MONEY MARKET & SECURITIES 
Reserve for Lower of Cost /Market 
TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



BANKNORTH CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



$10,700.51 


$10,700.51 


$0.00 


$9,630 60 


$11,097.00 


$1,466.40 


10,529.50 


11,660.00 


1,130.50 


9.651.90 


5,635.00 


(4,016.90) 


11,050.26 


12,366.00 


1,315.74 


10,468.26 


11,976.00 


1,507.74 


10,673.98 


7,200.00 


(3,473.98) 


11,886.50 


9,494.00 


(2,392.50) 


10,487.25 


4,950.00 


(5.537.25) 


11,128.25 


13,910.00 


2.781.75 


10,164.60 


6.660.00 


(3,504.60) 


9,714.50 


7,750.00 


(1,964.50) 


95,000.00 


58,391.71 


(36,608.29) 


23,507.29 


19,941.23 


(3,566.06) 


233,892.89 


181.030.94 


(52,861.95) 


244.593.40 


191.731.45 


(52,861.95) 


(52,861.95) 




52,861.95 


$191,731.45 


$191,731.45 


SO 00 


$7,244.41 






3,74441 


$10,988.82 




$10,988.82 


SO 00 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - Banknorth 

TOTAL FUNDS 



$6,008.55 
$208,728.82 



$6,008.55 
$208,728.82 



$0.00 
$0.00 



Decrease in Market Value from 1/1/02 



$30,319.04 



96 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING: DECEMBER 31 ,2002 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



H.W.4 MP BARNARD 

J.W.BARNARD 

ALICE M.BELL 

THOMAS BLACK 

EDNAGCHAPIN 

FRED W.DOYLE 

WARREN F.DRAPER 

WILLIAM G. GOLDSMITH 

ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 

MYRON E.GUTTERSON 

ANDOVER GRANGE 

NATHAN C. HAM BUN 

MARGARET F HINCHCUFFE 

PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 

ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 

HENRY WYATT 

A.F.B. & W A. TROW 

RES. FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 





ADDITIONS 


CURRENT 








BALANCE 


TO 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 


1/1/02 


PRINCIPAL 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/02 


$1,200 79 




($33.92) 


$1,166.87 


$0.00 


$1,166.87 


9,808.55 




(263.18) 


9,545.37 


275.00 * 


9,270.37 


1.465.06 




(39.29) 


1,425.77 


40.00 * 


1,385.77 


17,193.84 




130.01 


17,323.85 


600.00 


16,723.85 


3,355.72 




(90.01) 


3.265.71 


95.00 ' 


3,170.71 


13,050.86 




(346.90) 


12,703 96 


500.00 


12,203.96 


2,161.16 




(57.92) 


2,103.24 


60.00 * 


2,043.24 


3,376.31 




(91.21) 


3,285.10 


0.00 


3,285.10 


1 ,485.77 




(40.43) 


1,445.34 


40.00 * 


1,405.34 


1 ,857.89 




(5018) 


1 ,807.71 


0.00 


1 ,807.71 


3,646.40 




(97.91) 


3,548.49 


105.00 ' 


3,443.49 


21,111.86 




625.13 


21,736.99 


1,000.00 


20,736.99 


39,310.61 




(1 ,050.67) 


38,259.94 


2,000.00 


36,259.94 


13,744.52 




(367.45) 


13,377.07 


385.00 * 


12,992.07 


33,69013 




(899.46) 


32.790.67 


1.000.00 


31.790.67 


13,537.07 


904 59 -A) 


(377.66) 


14,064.00 


500.00 


13,564.00 


85,450.52 




1 .386.82 


86,837.34 


4,000.00 


82.837.34 


(21,863.74) 




(18.651.61) 


(40,515.35) 




(40,515.35) 


$243.583 32 


$904 59 


($20,315.83) 


$224,172.08 


$10,600.00 


$213,572.08 



Interest Income 

Dividend Income 

Capital Gain Distributions 

GairV(Loss) on Sale of Securities 

Brokerage Fees/Taxes 

Adj. for Lower of Cost/Market 



(A- Add'l funds contributed by Town Employees- 7/02, $804.59 
and Pentucket Educational and Charitable Foundation, $100. 
'Combined funds of $1 ,000 given as one scholarship. 

$1,50421 

6,15722 

8.97 

(9,317.12) 

(17.50) 

(18,651.61) 



NET INCOME 



($20,315.83) 



FUNDS HELD 



BANKNORTH CHECKING ACCT. 

BANKNORTH CDS (2) 

ALLIANCE MONEY MARKET FUND 

902.849 Shs. DELAWARE DECATUR INCOME FUND 

7,386 048 Shs. FEDERATED HIGH INCOME BOND FUND 

1 ,203.435 Shs. TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 

ALLIANCE MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 

980.171 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND 

543.473 Shs. PIONEER SMALL CAP/TROW FUND 

4,883.473 Shs. PIONEER HIGH YIELD/ TROW FUND 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 




VALUE 


VALUE 


Variance 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$0.00 


28,557.74 


28.557.74 


0.00 


21,711.29 


21,711.29 


0.00 


12.206.52 


14.371.33 


(2.164.81) 


52,293.22 


84.000.00 


(31 ,706.78) 


18,857.83 


22,509.73 


(3,651.90) 


1 ,047.31 


1,047.31 


0.00 


20,407.16 


26.068.18 


(5,661.02) 


10.874.89 


10,721.85 


153.04 


47,516.12 


45.000 00 


2,516.12 




(40,515.35) 


40,515.35 


$213,572.08 


$213,572.08 


$0.00 



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99 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

RECAP OF GENERAL FUND - BUDGET- FUND LEVEL 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED 06/30/2002 





RES FOR 


APPROP 


OFFSET 


RESERVE 


COMP 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


EXPENDED 


RES FOR 


TRANS TO 




ENCUM 


(ORIGINAL) 


RECEIPTS 


FUND 


FUND 




AVAILABLE 




ENCUM 


UNRE FD BL 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


1.733.214 00 


0.00 


000 


33.583 00 


000 


1.766.797 00 


1,758.888.04 


5.000.00 


2.908.96 


Other Expenses 


129.97670 


1.061.712.00 


00 


30.000 00 


00 


000 


1.221.688 70 


936.194 34 


213.922.76 


71.571.60 




129.97670 


2.794.926 00 


0.00 


30.000 00 


33.58300 


000 


2.988.485 70 


2,695.08238 


218.92276 


74.480 56 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 






















Personal Services 


000 


1.116.085.00 


0.00 


0.00 


35.65279 


00 


1.151.737 79 


1.148.737 79 


0.00 


3.000.00 


Other Expenses 


15,62228 


139,740 00 


13.000 00 


0.00 


000 


00 


168,36228 


128.771 69 


12.120.50 


27.470.09 




15.622 28 


1 .255.825 00 


13.000 00 


0.00 


35.65279 


00 


1.320,100.07 


1.277,509 48 


12.120.50 


30.470.09 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


340.720.00 


208.430.00 


00 


37.729.34 


00 


586.87934 


589,60234 


0.00 


(2.723.00) 


Other Expenses 


15.412.87 


62.600.00 


259.57000 


000 


0.00 


000 


337.58287 


291.21291 


41.466 75 


4,903.21 




15.412 87 


403.320 00 


468,000.00 


000 


37,72934 


0.00 


924.46221 


880.815 25 


41.466.75 


2.180.21 


ELDER SERVICES 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


388.944 00 


147.010.00 


000 


14.567.00 


000 


550,521.00 


546.361.20 


000 


4.159.80 


Other Expenses 


704.50 


141.901 00 


000 


0.00 


00 


00 


142,605.50 


116,026.61 


23,804 54 


2.77435 




704 50 


530.845.00 


147.010.00 


000 


14.567.00 


00 


693.126 50 


662.387 81 


23.804 54 


6.934.15 


MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


2.351.828 00 


115.000.00 


000 


3.32300 


000 


2.470.151.00 


2.421.767.38 


000 


48,38362 


Other Expenses 


1.149.080.81 


3.024.488 00 


95.000 00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


4.268.568.81 


3,291.692.94 


970.150.78 


6.725.09 




1,149.080 81 


5.376.316.00 


210,000.00 


000 


3.323.00 


0.00 


6.738.719.81 


5.713.460.32 


970.150.78 


55.10871 


PUBLIC SAFETY 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


8.916.87600 


725.490 00 


0.00 


168.422.21 


000 


9.810.788.21 


9.809.349.17 


0.00 


1.439.04 


Other Expenses 


36.70001 


774.007 00 


9.250.00 


0.00 


00 


00 


819.957 01 


673.028.98 


106.523 66 


40,404.37 




36.700.01 


9.690.88300 


734.740.00 


000 


168.42221 


00 


10,630.745 22 


10.482.378.15 


106,52366 


41.843.41 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




















Personal Services 


0.00 


1.392.287 00 


0.00 


00 


25,075.01 


00 


1.417.36201 


1.417.362.01 


0.00 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


155.897 87 


4.127.850 00 


0.00 


00 


000 


0.00 


4.283.747.87 


3.595.99506 


285.185 00 


402,567 81 




155.897.87 


5.520.137.00 


0.00 


00 


25.07501 


000 


5.701.109.88 


5.013.357.07 


285.18500 


402.567.81 


LIBRARY 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


1.717.541 00 


000 


0.00 


40.287.00 


000 


1.757,828.00 


1.744.280 17 


0.00 


13.547.83 


Other Expenses 


28.345 80 


627.600 00 


000 


000 


00 


0.00 


655.945.80 


637.484 48 


18.461 32 


000 




28.34580 


2.345.141.00 


0.00 


000 


40.287 00 


0.00 


2.413,77380 


2.381,764.65 


18.461.32 


13.547 83 


SCHOOL 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


34.245.711.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


105,07741 


34,350.788.41 


34.338.586 41 


12,20200 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


382.241.32 


8.269.086 00 


40.000 00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.027.056 58 


9,718.38390 


9.197,167.94 


521.215 96 


0.00 


GLRVTHS 


0.00 


73.88200 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


73,882.00 


73.882.00 


0.00 


0.00 




382.241 32 


42.588,679.00 


40.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.132.133.99 


44.143.054.31 


43.609.636.35 


533.417 96 


0.00 


UNCLASSIFIED 






















Compensation Fund 


0.00 


650,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(358.639.35) 


000 


291,360.65 


000 


291.360 65 


0.00 


Reserve Fund 


000 


200,000 00 


000 


(47.000 00) 


00 


00 


153.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


153,000.00 




0.00 


850,000 00 


0.00 


(47,000.00) 


(358.639.35) 


0.00 


444.360.65 


0.00 


291,360 65 


153,000.00 


FIXED EXPENSES 






















Debt Service - Interest 


0.00 


4.044.353 00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


(300.000.00) 


3.744.353.00 


3.743,640 88 


0.00 


712.12 


Debt Service - Principal 


0.00 


7,110.000.00 


000 


000 


000 


000 


7.110,000 00 


. 7.110.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Stabilization 


0.00 


74,769.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


74.769.00 


74,769.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Insurance 


459 00 


550.000 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


550.459.00 


541,800.00 


8.200.00 


459.00 


Health Insurance Fund 


0.00 


3.700.000 00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


300.000.00 


4,000.000 00 


4,000.000 00 


0.00 


000 


Unemployment Comp 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Retirement 


0.00 


3.835.711 00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


3.835.711.00 


3,823.84832 


00 


11.862 68 




459 00 


19.314.83300 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


19.315.29200 


19.294.058 20 


8.200 00 


13.033 80 




1.914,441.16 


90.670.905.00 


1.612.750.00 


(17,000.00) 


000 


1.132.133.99 


95.313,230 15 


92.010.449 66 


2.509.61392 


793,16657 


SEWER SYSTEM 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


277.641 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


277.641.00 


251,145.20 


0.00 


26,495.80 


Other Expenses 


425.894 48 


1.431.100 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,856.994.48 


1.325.160 46 


429.85275 


101,981.27 


GREATER LAW SANITARY 


17507 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


17507 


0.00 


175.07 


0.00 




426.069 55 


1,708,741 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2.134,81055 


1.576.305.66 


430.027 82 


128.477 07 


WATER DEPARTMENT 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


1 ,409.978 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.409,978.00 


1.346,054 09 


0.00 


63,92391 


Other Expenses 


880,179.93 


1.706,225 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2.586.404.93 


1,767,657.82 


745,09577 


73,651 34 




880.179.93 


3.116,203 00 


0.00 


000 


000 


0.00 


3.996.382.93 


3.113.711 91 


745.095 77 


137,57525 




1,306.249 48 


4.824,944.00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


6.131.19348 


4,690.01757 


1.175.12359 


266,05232 


GRAND TOTAL 


3,220.690 64 


95.495,84900 


1,612,750.00 


(17.000.00) 


000 


1.132.133.99 


101,444.423 63 


96.700.467 23 


3.684.737.51 


1,059,218 89 



100 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

DETAIL OF SPECIAL ARTICLES CLASSIFIED AS GENERAL FUND 

PERIOD ENDED JUNE 30, 2002 



ARTICLE 
NUMBER 



ARTICLE 

TITLE 



CONTINUED 
APPROPRIATION 



APPROP 



ART 15. 2002 


UNPAID BILLS 


000 


1.475 95 


ART 39. 2000 


TRANSCRIBE SELECTMEN'S MTG 


377 00 




ART 89, 1999 


OPPOSE GAS PLANT 


136 46 




ART 72. 2000 


OPPOSE GAS PLANT 


45.912.60 




ART 82. 2000 


BVALE MASTER PLAN 


10,000.00 




ART 85. 2000 


FIREWORKS FUND 


2.750 00 




ART 30. 2001 


OPPOSE NICKEL HILL 


50.000 00 




ART 44, 2001 


FIREWORKS 


9.000 00 








118.176 06 


1.475 95 


ART 40. 1997 


RECORD SCH/PL 


309 29 




ART 62. 1997 


MVRT TRANSP 


5.89401 




ART 16,2001 


ELDER/DISABLED TRANSPORTATION 


25.000 00 




ART 17,2001 


HOLIDAY LIGHTS 


15.000 00 




ART 20 2002 


HOLIDAY LIGHTS 




18.000 00 


ART 30 2002 


VISION 21 CONSULTANT 




5.000 00 


ART 17 2002 


FIREWORKS 




9.000 00 



TRANS 


TOTAL 


EXPENDED 


ENCUMB 


CONTINUED 


FROM 


AVAILABLE 






APPROPRIATION 


OTHER 












1.475 95 


1.475 95 




000 




377 00 






377 00 




136 46 






136 46 




45,91260 


45.91260 




000 




10.000 00 


10.000 00 




000 




2.750 00 






2.750 00 




50,000 00 


45,228 96 




4,771.04 




9,000 00 


9,000 00 




000 


000 


119.652 01 
309 29 


111.61751 


00 


8.034 50 
309 29 




5.894 01 


5.894 01 




000 




25.000 00 


10.995 99 


14,004 01 


000 




15.000 00 


15.000 00 




00 




18,000 00 






18.000 00 




5.000 00 






5,000 00 




9,000 00 






9,000 00 



46,20330 



32.000 00 



31,890 00 



14,00401 



32,30929 



ART 36 2002 



ART 57, 1995 
ART 54, 1996 



ASSESSORS REASSESSMENT 



WETLAND BYLAW 
CONSERVATION LAND 



300.000 00 



300.000 00 



ART 44. 1987 ELM SQ TRAFFIC SIGNAL 

ART 65-4. 1998 TRAFFIC SIGNALS 
ART 98. 1999 BALLARDVALE SIGN 



ART 33-7. 2001 
ART 32-2 2002 



ART 24, 1989 
ART 46. 1996 



MODULAR CLASSROOM 
HAVERHILL ST TAX TITLE 



PUBLIC SAFETY STUDY 
DISPATCH CENTER 



ART 48. 1997 RIVER ROAD LAND 

ART 49. 1997 BURTT ROAD 

ART 65-3, 1998 AERIAL MAPPING 



ART 58, 1997 ACQUIRE COLONIAL 

ART 59. 1997 ACQUIRE PATRIOT 

ART 95. 1998 DAVID DRIVE 



ART 23. 1998 SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 

ART 31.1999 SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 

ART 32. 1999 SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 

ART 2 1 . 2000 SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 

ART 22. 2000 ELDERLY DISABLED TRANSPORT 



ART 45. 1992 WAR MEMORIAL 

ART 65-8. 1998 SKATEBOARD BARK 
TOTAL GENERAL FUND 



000 


300.000 00 


000 


300.000 00 


000 


000 


300.000 00 


1.461 19 






1.461 19 






1.461 19 


2.331 84 






2.331 84 


2.331 84 




00 


3.793 03 


000 


000 


3.793 03 


2.331 84 


00 


1.461 19 


5.313 08 






5.31308 




2.320 00 


2.993 08 


8,332 48 






8.332 48 






8.33248 


4.000 00 






4.000 00 






4,000 00 


17.645 56 


000 


00 


17.645 56 


00 


2.320 00 


15.325 56 


55.000 00 






55.000 00 


55.000 00 




0.00 




200.000 00 




200.000 00 


4.717 86 


2.148 09 


193.134 05 


55.000 00 


200.000 00 


000 


255.000 00 


59.71786 


2.148 09 


193.134 05 


20.000 00 




-20.000 00 


000 






000 


857 80 






857 80 






857 80 


20.857 80 


000 


-20.000 00 


857 80 


00 


000 


857 80 


5.000 00 






5.000.00 






5.000 00 


100 00 






100 00 






100 00 


31.309 45 






31.309 45 


31,309 45 




000 


36.409 45 


000 


00 


36.409 45 


31.309 45 


00 


5.100 00 


16.968.10 






16.968 10 






16.968 10 


10,603 90 






10.60390 






10.603 90 


6,897 03 






6,897 03 






6.897 03 


34,46903 


000 


00 


34.469 03 


00 


00 


34.46903 


5,000 00 




-5,000 00 


0.00 






00 


4,000.00 






4.000 00 






4,000 00 


-1,54550 






-1.54550 






-1,545 50 


2.000.00 






2.000 00 






2,000 00 


12.407 00 






12.407.00 






12.407 00 



21.861 50 


00 


-5.000 00 


16.861 50 


00 


00 


16.861 50 


2.034 13 






2,034 13 


999 50 




1.034 63 


2,034 13 


000 


00 


2.034 13 


999 50 


00 


1.034 63 


681 30 






681 30 


681 30 




000 


681 30 


000 


00 


681 30 


681 30 


000 


00 


357,131 16 


533,47595 


-25.000 00 


865.607 11 


238,547 46 


18.472 10 


608.587 55 



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Town of Andover 

Special Revenue/Grants Rollforward 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2002 



FUND/TITLE 



CDAG CITY NORTH 
PWED G-9403 



PWED 



CHAPTER 90 



ELECTION OT GRANT 



BALANCE 




DEPART- 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


BALANCE 


07/01/01 INTERGOVTAL 


INTEREST 


MENTAL 


REVENUES 


EXPEND 


OFS/OFU 


06/30/02 


11.883 10 






0.00 




0.00 


11.883.10 


-52.968.62 






000 


784.00 


0.00 


-53.752.62 



-41. 085. 52 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


784 00 


0.00 


-41.869.52 


68.028 16 




1.526.89 




1.526 89 




0.00 


69,555 05 


68,028 16 


0.00 


1.526 89 


000 


1.526 89 


00 


0.00 


69,555.05 


-143.88628 


632.839 36 






632.83936 


795.222.88 


00 


-306.269.80 


-143.886 28 


632 839 36 


000 


000 


632.839 36 


795.222.88 


000 


-306,269 80 


6.07081 








00 


334 00 


0.00 


5.73681 


6.07081 


0.00 


000 


000 


000 


334 00 


000 


5,736.81 



FY97 COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT 

FY96 DARE GRANT 

FY98 COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT 

FY98 DARE GRANT 

BLOCK GRANT 

FY99 DARE GRANT 

FY99 COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT 

FY2000 COMMUNITY POLICING 

JUVENILE ACCOUNTIBILITY BLOCK 

POLICE ANTENNEA 

CHILD PASSENGER SAFETY 

SELECTIVE ENFORCEMENT 

COPS UNIVERSAL HIRING 

FY02 COMMUNITY POLICING 

FY02 DARE 

DISASTER REIMBURSEMENTS 



30.423 19 

6.487 84 

-54595 

-9.188.58 

3.606.61 

-42.752.05 

-20043 

3.941.33 

456 00 

22.36362 

-2.225.45 

720.51 

12.330 00 



5.337 37 



44.20866 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

15.000 00 
000 
0.00 
5.337.37 
0.00 
0.00 
000 

44.208 66 
0.00 



31.020.27 



594 69 



22,158 37 
3,351.31 



000 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
2,000.00 
-15.000.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
000 
0.00 
0.00 
000 
15.000.00 



-597.08 

6.487 84 

-545.95 

-9.188.58 

3.60661 

-45.190.29 

-200.43 

3.941.33 

456.00 

27.700.99 

-2.225.45 

125.82 

12.330 00 

22,050.29 

11.648.69 



12.90061 








000 




0.00 


12.900 61 


38.31725 


15.000 00 


000 


49.546 03 


64.546 03 


61.562.88 


2.000 00 


43.30040 



TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 

HEALTHY COMMUNITY TOBACCO 

RIVER RD JOB 2818 

STRATEGIC PLANNING 

LIBRARY NON-RESIDENT CIRC 

MASS RELEAF 

RECYCLE INCENTIVE 

UTILITY FORCE PARK AND RIDE 

ARTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 

RIGHT TO KNOW 

LSTA PRESERVATION 

LSTA INFORMATION LITERACY 

NATIONAL LEADERSHIP GRANT 

SECONDHAND SMOKE INITIATIVE 

LIBRARY AID CH 78 SEC 19A 

LIBRARY MRLS 

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT 



COMM SEPTIC MGMT PROG G 



72.406 68 

-34.165.90 

37.84200 

140.00 

5.98 

2.554 00 

12.675.00 

-3.922.11 

27.845.99 

973.30 

0.00 

1.892.00 

347.74 

1.000.00 

45.231 40 

2.500.00 



110.536 83 
39.680 00 



8.280.00 
8.660 00 



110.536 83 
39.680 00 
0.00 
000 
0.00 
000 

8.280 00 
0.00 

8.660 00 
0.00 
0.00 

4,494 00 
0.00 
00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



88.99524 
71.455 34 



2.554.00 
4.900.00 

6.660 00 

269.90 

1.620.00 

83.38 

40.898 58 

3.707.91 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



93.948.27 

-65.941 24 

37.842.00 

140.00 

5.98 

0.00 

16,055.00 

-3.922 11 

29.845.99 

973.30 

-269.90 

4.766.00 

264.36 

1.000.00 

4.332.82 

2.500.00 

-3,707,91 



OFF STREET PARKING 



167.326.08 


4.494,00 


0.00 


167.156 83 


171.650 83 


221.144 35 


0.00 


117.832 56 


7.737.50 








0.00 




0.00 


7.737.50 


7.737.50 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


7.737.50 


126.589.59 






99.434 14 


99.434 14 


96018 


-96.740.00 


128.323.55 


126.589.59 


000 


000 


99.434 14 


99,434 14 


960.18 


-96.740.00 


128.32355 



P&F DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
TOWN DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
DMM FIELDS REVOLVING 
PUBLIC SAFETY DAMAGE REST 
PUBLIC WORKS DAMAGE REST 
LIBRARY DAMAGE RESTITUTION 



SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



WETLAND FILING FEES 



328.08 

87.292.91 

17.902.92 

3.122.50 

101.34 

18.008.05 



44.333.17 


44.333.17 


35.132.56 


0.00 


9,528.69 




0.00 


74,500.00 


11.251.13 


24,044.04 


12.735.00 


12.735.00 


11,536.44 


-11,251.13 


7,850.35 


200.00 


200.00 




0.00 


3,322.50 


4.690.56 


4,690.56 




0.00 


4,791.90 


5.85242 


5.852.42 


13,725.04 


0.00 


10,135.43 



126.755.80 


0.00 


0.00 


67.811 15 


67.811 15 


134.894.04 


0.00 


59.672.91 


18.870.00 








0.00 


000 


0.00 


18.870.00 


18.870.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


18.870.00 


-14.367.94 






9,387.00 


9,387.00 


0.00 


-13,000.00 


-17,980.94 


-14.367.94 


0.00 


0.00 


9,387.00 


9.387.00 


0.00 


-13.000.00 


-17,980.94 



105 



Town of Andover 

Special Revenue/Grants Rollforward 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2002 



NRPA FOOTBALL 

FY01 SERVICE INCENTIVE 

NEW HORIZONS FOR YOUTH 

C44 S53 DCS REVOLVING 

CH 44 S53 YOUTH SERVICES 

COA CH44 SEC 53E 1/2 

DMM (FIELDS) REVOLVING 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 



CDP CH44 SEC 53E1/2 



FRONTAGE ROAD 
RECYCLABLE BATTERY PROGR 



LOCAL EMERG. PLANNING COM 
ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING 



BALANCE 






DEPART- 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 




BALANCE 


07/01/01 


INTERGOVTAL 


INTEREST 


MENTAL 


REVENUES 


EXPEND 


OFS/OFU 


06/30/02 


1.000.00 








0.00 


990.00 




0.00 


10.00 


-268.28 






5,000.00 


5,000.00 






0.00 


4,731.72 




17,000.00 




22.432.76 


39.432.76 


44.881.55 




0.00 


-5.448.79 


146.20941 






217.746.00 


217.746.00 


205.145.69 




0.00 


158.809.72 


90.189.83 






113.189.54 


113.189.54 


120,123.39 




0.00 


83.255.98 


25.406.62 






71,043.46 


71,043.46 


60,948.46 




0.00 


35.501.62 


19.657.00 








000 






0.00 


19.657.00 


5.049.27 






13.100.00 


13.100.00 


9,149.84 




000 


8,999.43 


2,217.92 






12.10208 


12.10208 


5.398 03 




0.00 


8.921.97 



289,461.77 


17.000 00 


0.00 


454.61384 


471,613.84 


446,636 96 


0.00 


314,438.65 


43,983.79 






49,505.00 


49.505.00 


37,14855 


000 


56,340.24 


43.98379 


0.00 


0.00 


49.505.00 


49,505.00 


37.148.55 


0.00 


56,340.24 


3.855.66 

3.05384 








0.00 

0.00 




0.00 

000 


3.855.66 
3.053.84 


6.909.50 


000 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


6.909.50 


950 00 
300.00 








0.00 

0.00 




0.00 

000 


950.00 
300.00 


1,250 00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,250.00 



SHED CONTRIBUTIONS 

GIFT - FIREWORKS 

ART 27. 1995 DISABILITIES 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY GIFT 

OLD TOWN HALL RESTORATION 

TOWN GIFT & DONATIONS 

COMMUNITY GARDEN PROJECT 

CONSERVATION GIFT 

CONSERVATION TRAIL ACCOUNT 

DCS-GIFT 

YOUTH SERVICES GIFTS/CONTRIBUT 

COA BUILDING FUND 

COA SCHOLARSHIPS 

DARE CONTRIBUTIONS 

LIBRARY GIFTS & DONATIONS 

VETERAN'S SERVICES GIFTS 

CABLE TV COMMUNITY ACCESS 

HOME FOR THE AGED GIFT 

DPW GIFTS AND DONATIONS 

MILLENNUIM CELEBRATION 



PRIVATE CEMETERY FUNDS 



7,26381 

-2.563.38 

-345.58 

268.947.89 

468.78 

1.84 

27.38 

4.964 14 

234 85 

812.68 

5.940.85 

-2.882.54 

150.00 

1.535.00 

27.280.58 



8,244.76 



4.584 68 





0.00 




0.00 


7.263.81 




00 




0.00 


-2.563.38 




0.00 




0.00 


-345.58 


101.418 14 


101,418.14 




0.00 


370,366.03 




0.00 




0.00 


468.78 




0.00 




0.00 


1.84 




000 




0.00 


27.38 




0.00 




0.00 


4.964 14 




0.00 




0.00 


234.85 




0.00 




0.00 


812.68 


14.68300 


14.683.00 


10.508.07 


000 


10.115.78 


890 00 


890.00 




0.00 


-1.992.54 




0.00 




0.00 


150.00 




0.00 


290.89 


0.00 


1,244.11 


26.265.90 


26.265.90 


38,966.57 


0.00 


14.579.91 


1.200.00 


1.200.00 




0.00 


1,200.00 


50.000.00 


50.000.00 


18,131 37 


0.00 


31,868.63 


110.000.00 


114.584.68 


9.32359 


0.00 


105.261.09 


75.000.00 


75.000.00 


75.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


4,116.94 


0.00 


4,127.82 



320.081 06 


00 


4.584.68 


379.457.04 


384.041 72 


156.337 43 


0.00 


547,785.35 


-54,909.92 








0.00 




0.00 


-54,909.92 


-54.909.92 


00 


00 


0.00 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


-54.909.92 



A19. 2001 ACCUM BENEFITS 
A18, 2002 ACCUM BENEFITS 
A39 2000 ACCUMULATED LEAVE 



CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS FUND 



ACCRUED INTEREST 



300.000.00 
19.978.15 



0.00 


131,849.49 


0.00 


168,150.51 


000 




300.000.00 


300.000.00 


0.00 


19,978.15 


0.00 


0.00 



319.978.15 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


151.827.64 


300.000.00 


468.150.51 


89,992.52 






11.880.00 


11,880.00 




-40.000.00 


61.872.52 


89.992.52 


0.00 


0.00 


11.880.00 


1 1 ,880.00 


0.00 


^10.000.00 


61,872 52 


75,250.67 






299.143.56 


299,143.56 


99.470.60 


0.00 


274,923.63 


75.250.67 


0.00 


00 


299.143.56 


299.143.56 


99.47060 


0.00 


274.923.63 



MEALS TAX 

TAILINGS - UNCLAIMED CHE 

FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 

POLICE OFF DUTY 

FIRE OFF DUTY 



Total Town 



1,452.352.99 


669.333.36 


6,111.57 


1,587,934.59 


2.263,379.52 


2,106,323.51 


152,260.00 


1,761.669.00 


-1.858.04 






1,100.81 


1.100.81 


1.092.75 


0.00 


-1,849.98 


20.861.64 






1.548.34 


1,548.34 




-22.409.98 


0.00 


-36.50 






9.918.00 


9.918.00 


9.918.00 


0.00 


-36.50 


-102,410.84 






1.223.194.81 


1.223.194.81 


1.409,441.25 


0.00 


-288.657.28 


703.54 






38.425.00 


38.425.00 


38.611.89 


0.00 


51665 


-82,740 20 


0.00 


0.00 


1.274,186.96 


1.274,186 96 


1.459.063.89 


-22,409.98 


-290,027.11 


1,369,612.79 


669,333.36 


6,111.57 


2.862,121.55 


3,537,566.48 


3.565,387.40 


129,850.02 


1,471,641.89 



106 



Town of Andover 

Special Revenue/Grants Rollforward 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2002 



FUND/TITLE 
FOOD SERVICES 

ATHLETICS 



BALANCE 






DEPART- 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


BALANCE 


07/01/01 


INTERGOVTAL 


INTEREST 


MENTAL 


REVENUES 


EXPEND 


OFS/OFU 


06/30/02 



179.067.58 


133.750.49 




838.294 53 


972,045.02 


964.698 06 


0.00 


186,414.54 


179.067 58 


133.750 49 


00 


838.294 53 


972,04502 


964.69806 


000 


186,414 54 


23.051.86 






126.597 64 


126.597.64 


109.403.00 


000 


40.246.50 


23.051.86 


000 


000 


126.597 64 


126.597 64 


109.403.00 


000 


40,246.50 



SPED ENTITLEMENT 


30.790.89 




SPED ENTITLEMENT 




492.474.00 


EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLOCATION 


0.00 


20.925.00 


CURRICULUM FRAMEWORKS 


35.753.31 




SPEC CORR ACT ASST 


0.00 


7.000 00 


CHAPTER 70 


93.648 18 




DRUG FREE SCHOOLS 


0.00 


30.009.00 


TITLE 1 READING 


1.717.33 


163.237.00 


Title VI 


14.271.63 


18.941 00 


HIGH SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT 


0.00 


10.000 00 


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 


2.289.56 


24.553 00 


ADVANCED PLACEMENT 


2.038.94 




CLASS SIZE REDUCTION 


1.772.99 


44.958 00 


ACADEMIC SUPORT 


9.975.00 


45.435 00 


KINDERGARTEN TRANSITION 


7.500.00 


7.500 00 


KINDERGARTEN ENHANCEMENT 


0.00 


18.000 00 


HEALTH PROTECTION 


0.00 


124.991.00 


SAFE SCHOOLS 


0.00 


2.100 00 


DRUG FREE SCHOOLS 


0.00 


32.265.00 


CORPORATE GRANTS 


14.326 59 




EQUIPMENT GRANT 


13.735.00 




ANDOVER HIGH DONATIONS 






LEA REVOLVING 


35.209.74 


29.600.00 


ANDOVER CARES 


737 40 




AIRS 


19.456.94 




ANDOVER /EISAI SCIENCE 


1.357.14 




COLLINS CTR REVOLVING 


33.21485 







0.00 


30.79089 


0.00 


0.00 




492.474.00 


619.878.79 


0.00 


-127,404.79 




20.925.00 


25.248.00 


0.00 


-4,323.00 




0.00 


29.980 22 


0.00 


5.773.09 




7.000.00 


2.84348 


0.00 


4,156.52 




0.00 


93.648.18 


000 


0.00 




30.009 00 


30.009.00 


0.00 


0.00 




163.237.00 


140.452.85 


0.00 


24.501.48 




18,941.00 


19.891.07 


0.00 


13.321.56 




10.000.00 


10.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 




24.553 00 


17.718.86 


0.00 


9.123.70 




000 


2.038.94 


0.00 


0.00 




44.958.00 


52.688.84 


0.00 


-5,957.85 




45.435.00 


54.350.50 


0.00 


1.059.50 




7.500.00 


15.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 




18.000.00 


16.902.96 


0.00 


1.097.04 




124.991.00 


122.982.40 


0.00 


2,008.60 




2.100.00 


2.100.00 


0.00 


0.00 




32.265 00 


32.265.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6.426 00 


6.426 00 


14.949.89 


0.00 


5.802.70 




0.00 


8.636.28 


0.00 


5.098.72 


52.74075 


52.740.75 


20,110.14 


0.00 


32,630.61 




29.600.00 


58.88428 


0.00 


5,925.46 




0.00 


690.00 


0.00 


47.40 


4.940 11 


4.940 11 


7.081 99 


0.00 


17.315.06 




0.00 


1.357.14 


0.00 


0.00 


116.586 12 


116.586 12 


121.036.22 


000 


28,764.75 



317.79549 



1.071.988 00 



000 



180.692 98 



1.252.680 98 



1.551.535 92 



18.940.55 



EARLY CHILDHOOD REV 
COMMUNITY ASK. REVOLVING 
PARENT TO PARENT REVOLVING 
ANDOVER BUDDY CORPS 
FINE ARTS 
PHYS ED REVOLV 
LOST BOOKS 

STUDENT TEACHER REVOLVING 
OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES REV 
ALUMNI REVOLVING 



Total School 
Grand Total 



22.565.20 
5.820.69 
6.569.83 
4.500.00 
6.172.10 
6.476.96 
14.570.02 
17.948.98 
81.892.49 
2.243.56 



11,735.00 


11.735.00 


30.036.09 


0.00 


4.264.11 




0.00 


428.26 


0.00 


5,392.43 


8.217.31 


8.217.31 


5.437.19 


000 


9,349.95 




0.00 




0.00 


4.500.00 


13.698 50 


13.698.50 


15.291.97 


0.00 


4,578.63 




0.00 




0.00 


6.476.96 


13.464.91 


13,464.91 


7.505.45 


0.00 


20.529.48 




0.00 


9.620.15 


0.00 


8.328.83 


53.966.79 


53.966.79 


59.801.56 


0.00 


76.057.72 


2.500.00 


2.500.00 


2.79869 


0.00 


1.944.87 



168,759.83 


00 


00 


103.582 51 


103,582.51 


130,919.36 


0.00 


141,422.98 


688.674.76 


1.205,738.49 


0.00 


1.249.167.66 


2,454.906.15 


2.756,556.34 


0.00 


387,024.57 



2.058.287.55 



1,875,071.85 



4,111.289.21 



5.992.472.63 



1,858,666.46 



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Town of Andover 

Analysis of Bonds Authorized and Outstanding 

December 31, 2002 (Post 12/15/02 issue) 



ARTICLE PROJECT NAME 

ART 18, 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 26, 1995 FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 47, 1996 SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 1 6, 1 999 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER (EXEMPT) 

ART 41 , 1999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - SO MAIN ST 

ART 42, 1 999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - ROGERS BROOK 

ART 44, 1 999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 74, 1999 MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

ART 9, 2000 MIDDLE/ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (EXEMPT) 

ART 32, 2000 LAND ACQ - CONSERVATION 

ART 1 2, 2001 LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCT RD 

ART 32, 2001 BRIDGES AND BUILDINGS 

ART 1 0, 2002 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER (ADD'L FUNDING) (EXEMPT) 

ART 1 1 , 2002 NEW SCHOOL ADDITIONAL FUNDING 

ART 12, 2002 WEST ELEMENTARY ASBESTOS REMOVAL 

ART 23, 2002 CONSERVATION FUND 

ART 28-1, 2002 TOWN BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 28-2, 2002 SCHOOL BUILDING INPROVEMENTS 

ART 42, 2002 WATER TREAT PLANT DESIGN PLANS 

ART 43, 2002 WATER MAINS 

ART 48, 2002 MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENTS 



AUTHORIZATION 

AMOUNT 

07/01/02 

1,160,000.00 

384,000.00 

4,000.00 

552.00 

17,500,000.00 

4,300,000.00 

2,200,000.00 

304,000.00 

28,938,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

2,000,000.00 

1,157,000.00 

830,000.00 

350,000.00 

1 ,800,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

125,000.00 

935,000.00 

975,000.00 

500,000.00 

269,500.00 



BONDING AUTHORIZATION 
AMOUNT 
06/30/03 

1,160,000.00 

384,000.00 

4,000.00 

552.00 

4,000,000.00 13,500,000.00 

1,000,000.00 3,300,000.00 

2,200,000.00 

304,000.00 

7,000,000.00 21,938,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

2,000,000.00 

1,157,000.00 

1,660,000.00 

700,000.00 

3,600,000.00 

3,000,000.00 

250,000.00 

1,870,000.00 

1,950,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

539,000.00 



66,732,052.00 12,000,000.00 62,016,552.00 



114 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUND 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2002 

RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Finance Committee: 



Transfers by Vote of Town Meeting 
April , 2001 



General Government 
New Horizons Grant Match 



30,000.00 
17,000.00 



From Taxation 



200,000.00 



Transfer to Surplus 



153,000.00 
200,000.00 



200,000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfer by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting 
April , 2001 



General Government 
Community Development 
Community Services 
Elder Services 
Plant and Facilities 
Public Safety 
Public Works 
Library 



33,583.00 
35,652.79 
37,729.34 
14,567.00 
3,323.00 
168,422.21 
25,075.01 
40,287.00 



From Taxation 



650,000.00 



Carryforward 



291,360.65 



650,000.00 



650,000.00 



115 



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116 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 26, 2002 

The Total Number of Active Voters as of March 6, 2002: 19, 094 
The total number of ballots cast was 1718, viz: 



Precinct 1 181 
Precinct 5 164 



Precinct 2 157 
Precinct 6 185 



Precinct 3 
Precinct 7 



196 
176 



Precinct 4 193 
Precinct 8 201 



Precinct 9 265 



Precinct Precinct Precinct Precinct Precinct Precinct Precinct Precinct Precinct 
123456789 



TOTALS 



MODERATOR 

JAMES D DOHERTY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total Votes 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

MARY KELVIE LYMAN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total Votes 



151 


121 


160 


157 


136 


148 


145 


163 


210 


1391 


27 


29 


33 


36 


26 


35 


27 


37 


50 


300 


3 


7 


3 





2 


2 


4 


1 


5 


27 


181 


157 


196 


193 


164 


185 


176 


201 


265 


1718 


144 


127 


156 


148 


133 


140 


141 


164 


197 


1350 


33 


28 


38 


44 


30 


41 


32 


36 


65 


347 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 


4 


3 


1 


3 


21 


181 


157 


196 


193 


164 


185 


176 


201 


265 


1718 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 






















MARGARET N. 


KRUSE 


85 


61 


80 


76 


90 


79 


83 


101 


131 


786 


CHRISTOPHER G. 






















SMITH 




93 


96 


113 


111 


73 


104 


87 


99 


131 


907 


Blanks 




1 





3 


6 


1 


1 


6 





2 


20 


Misc. Others 




2 














1 





1 


1 


5 


Total Votes 




181 


157 


196 


193 


164 


185 


176 


201 


265 


1718 



SPECIAL ELECTION 
JUNE 11, 2002 

The Total Number of Active Voters as of March 6, 2002: 19, 094 
The total number of ballots cast was 1718, viz: 
Precinct 1 775 Precinct 2 802 Precinct 3 818 Precinct 4 787 
Precinct 5 889 Precinct 6 843 Precinct 7 852 Precinct 8 1069 Precinct 9 984 



QUESTION 
#1 


Precinct 

1 


Precinct 

2 


Precinct 
3 


Precinct 
4 


Precinct 

5 


Precinct 
6 


Precinct 

7 


Precinct 
8 


Precinct 
9 


TOTALS 


YES 


304 


241 


302 


294 


366 


289 


317 


440 


328 


2881 


NO 


471 


561 


516 


493 


523 


553 


535 


629 


656 


4937 


Blanks 

















1 











1 


Total 


775 


802 


818 


787 


889 

QUESTION 


843 


852 


1069 


984 


7819 


Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to assess an additional $1,130,000 in real estate and personal property 
taxes for the purposes of funding the School Department budget and related health insurance costs for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 2002? 



117 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 12, 2002 the Inhabitants of said Town who are 
qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. All 
eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and Nine are to vote at the Field 
House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-SIXTH DAY OF MARCH, 2002 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified 
the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said Warrant, by 
posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house and in no less than five 
other public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said 
Warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years and one School Committee 
member for three years. 

All of the above candidates are to be voted on one ballot. The polls will open from seven o'clock 
A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue 
of Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to Monday, April 22, 2002, at seven o'clock 
P.M. in the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, then and there to begin 
acting upon articles that follow in this warrant. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 22, 2002 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 2 1 65 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 7:03 P.M. 

The opening prayer was giving by Calvin Mutti, South Church, Central Street. • 

Salute to the flag was led by Ted Teichert, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

The Andover High School Chorus sang America and the Star Spangled Banner. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit fifty-seven (57) non- voters to the meeting and allow non- 
voters to be escorted to the non- voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or cell phones in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to the 
warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

118 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator introduced Charles Dalton, the Town Meeting "Ombudsman" and reminded meeting 
members that he would help them with questions on process and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator outlined the rules and regulations of the meeting to the meeting participants, 
and announced the use of pro and con microphones when appropriate during the meeting. 

Ted Teichert, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, presented a status report of previously approved Town 
projects. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years and one School Committee 
member for three years. 

All candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 26, 2002. The Polls were open from 7:00 AM 
to 8:00 PM. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

Mary Kelvie Lyman Selectman for One Year 

Christopher G. Smith School Committee for Three Years 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Edward Cole, 43 River Street, be elected Trustee 
of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the elected 
Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 
Selectmen - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $1,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderator's salary. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

119 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise and 
appropriate, including appropriations from available funds and/or transfer from the Stabilization Fund, to 
defray charges and expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, sidewalk reconstruction including 
acquisition of easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal 
Year beginning July 1, 2002 and ending June 30, 2003 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

ARTICLE 4 - 2002 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
1 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,784,623 



OTHER EXPENSES 
TOTAL 



1,044,871 
2,829,494 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

COMMUNITY 

DEVELOPMENT 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



including $6,000 in receipts from wetland filing 
fees 



1,128,247 



OTHER EXPENSES 
TOTAL 



131,925 
1,260,172 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES: 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



including $190,755 in receipts from programs and 
activities 



564,349 



OTHER EXPENSES 
TOTAL 



including $250,245 in receipts from programs and 
activities 



306,545 



870,894 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

ELDER SERVICES: 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



including $48,500 in federal receipts, $30,100 in 
grants and $66,600 in meals donations, adult day 
receipts and newsletter ads 



553,928 



OTHER EXPENSES 
TOTAL 



127,700 
681,628 



120 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was moved to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

PLANT & FACILITIES: 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



including $70,000 in rental receipts, $80,000 from 
perpetual care and $40,000 from sale of lots 



2,680,319 



10A OTHER EXPENSES 



including $35.000 from perpetual care 



1,279,950 



Line items 9 &10A were approved by a Majority Vote. 



10B 



including $600,000 from Stabilization Fund and to 
authorize the Selectmen to acquire easements for 
sidewalk reconstruction by gift, purchase or 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND (2/3 VOTE jemment domain 

TOTAL 6,212,269 



2,252,000 



It was moved and seconded to amend Line Item 10B to reduce funding of $376,000 titled 
"Reconstruction " of Existing Sidewalks" and $377,000 titled "School Technology". 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority Vote. 



The original motion for Line Item 10B was approved. 



VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote is Required 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the 
following sums of money by a Majority vote. 
PUBLIC SAFETY: 



11 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



including: $65,000 - grants, $60,000 - police detail 
fees, $62,191 - parking receipts and $600,000 - 
ambulance receipts 



9,917,305 



12 OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL 



including $9,600 from parking meter receipts 782,410 

10,699,715 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

PUBLIC WORKS: 
13 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,399,192 



14 OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL 



4,096,050 
5,495,242 



121 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

SEWER: 
15 PERSONAL SERVICES 329,952 



16 OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL 



1,591,900 
1,921,852 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

WATER: 
17 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,549,625 



18 OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL 



1,885,725 
3,435,350 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

LIBRARY: 
19 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,717,764 



20 OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL 



644,600 
2,362,364 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES: 
21 COMPENSATION FUND 1,193,000 



22 RESERVE FUND 

TOTAL 



200,000 
1,393,000 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 



23 



ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 

PERSONAL SERVICES 



36,651,511 



24 OTHER EXPENSES 

TOTAL 



Including $40,000 in insurance collections for 
student services 



10,167,995 



46,819,506 



122 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22. 23. 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL: 

25 GR LAW ASSESSMENT 77,297 

TOTAL 77,297 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of 
money by a Majority vote. 

FIXED EXPENSE: 

26 INTEREST EXPENSE 4,748,243 

27 BOND REDEMPTION 7,938,000 

28 STABILIZATION FUND 

29 GENERAL INSURANCE 625,000 

30 RETIREMENT FUND 3,554,704 

31 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 4,255,000 
TOTAL 21,120,947 



GRAND TOTAL 1 05,1 79,730 

less dedicated Revenues (2,253,991) 

NET TOTAL 102,925,739 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



123 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 
ARTICLE 4 - 2002 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING SPECIAL, ARTICLES 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FREE CASH 



Article 8 Free Cash FY 2003 



$300,000 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 



Article 7 Supplemental School FY2002 Budget 

Article 9 Municipal Building/Insurance Fund 

Article 15 Unpaid Bill - Police Department 

Article 17 Fireworks 

Article 18 Accumulated Employee Benefit Plan 

Article 20 Holiday Lighting 

Article 26 Nicholas Circle 

Article 30 Vision 21 Committee Consultant Monies 

Article 32 Building Repairs/Maintenance - 16 Haverhill St 

Article 34 Town Projects 

Library HAVC 

Fire Rescue Tools 

Police Reverse 911 
Article 36 Assessor Property Re-inspection Program 
Article 50 Lovejoy/Dascomb Road Intersection Improvements 



$1,100,000.00 

$74,500.00 

$1,475.95 

$9,000.00 

$300,000.00 

$18,000.00 

$22,000.00 

$5,000.00 

$200,000.00 

$410,000.00 

$25,000.00 

$65,000.00 

$300,000.00 

$93,500.00 



TOTAL $2,623,475.95 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Transfer from: 
Article 6 Debt Service - Interest 



$300,000 



and be appropriated to the following: 
Health Insurance Fund 



$300,000 



Article 50 Article 29 of 1 997 Annual Town Meeting 



$28,611 



and be appropriated to the following: 

Lovejoy/Dascomb Road Intersection Improvements $28,611 



124 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 

Article 1 Public Safety Center Additional Funding $830,000 

Article 11 New School Additional Funding $350,000 

Article 1 2 West Elementary Asbestos Removal $ 1 ,800,000 

Article 23 Conservation Fund $1,500,000 
Article 28 Town & School Improvements 

Town Buildings $125,000 

School Buildings $935,000 

Article 42 Water Treatment Plant Improvement Design Plans $975,000 

Article 43 Water Mains $500,000 

Article 48 Main Street Improvements $269,500 

TOTAL $7,284,500 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

NONE 
SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 1/2 REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 

Article 19A Community Development and Planning Department $30,000 

Article 19B Health Department - Title V $20,000 

Article 19C Health Department $5,000 

Article 19D Division of Community Services $250,000 

Article 19E Division of Youth Services $150,000 

Article 19F Field Maintenance $50,000 

Article 1 9G Division of Elder Services $ 1 00,000 

Article 19H Public Safety $50,000 

TOTAL $655,000 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 5 2 1/2 Override Contingent Appropriation For School Dept. $1,130,000 

Article 16 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program $25,000 



TOTAL $1,155,000 

125 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30. 2002 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM STABILIZATION FUND 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER & WATER RESERVES 

Article 44 Transfer $225,000 from Sewer Reserves and $100,000 
From Water Reserves for: 

Hydrant Replacement Program $50,000 

GIS $75,000 

Sanitary Sewer System Inflow & Infiltration Detection $200,000 

TOTAL $325,000 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM CONSERVATION FUND 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OFF STREET PARKING FUND 

Article 49 Parking Lot Improvements $30,000 

Old Andover Village & Memorial Hall Library 

A true record 
ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$1,130,000 for the School Department budgets and related health insurance costs for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 2002 contingent upon the subsequent approval of a ballot question(s) allowing the Town of 
Andover to assess an additional $1,130,000 in real estate and personal property taxes or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
a sum of $1,130,000 for the School Department budgets and related health insurance costs for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 2002 contingent upon the subsequent approval of a ballot question(s) allowing the Town of 
Andover to assess an additional $1,130,000 in real estate and personal property taxes. 

126 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

VOTE: Yes: 1366 No: 692 

Article 5 was approved by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the April 23, 
2001 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the Town transfer the sum of $300,000 from Debt 
Service-Interest Expense and appropriate to the Health Insurance Fund by a Majority Vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to supplement 
appropriations voted at the April 23, 2001 Annual Town Meeting or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of $ 1 , 1 00,000 be transferred from Free Cash 
and appropriated to School Department - Other Expenses to supplement appropriations voted at the April 23, 
2001 Annual Town Meeting by a Majority Vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash to reduce 
the Fiscal Year 2003 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2002 Annual Town Meeting. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 8 as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $300,000 by a Majority Vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the 
treasury. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 



127 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the Town transfer the sum of $74,500 from Free 
Cash and appropriate to the Municipal Building/Insurance Fund, said sum being the amount of insurance 
proceeds received on January 25, 2001 for damages to a fire department ambulance by a Majority Vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 9:45 P.M., until Tuesday, April 23, 
2002 at 7:00 P.M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 23, 2002 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 741 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:00 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit 22 (twenty-two) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or cell phones in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to the 
warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Charles "Bucky" Dalton and reminded voters that they can go to 
Mr. Dalton for help, questions and for the three part forms to use in making their amendments to the 
Moderator in writing. 

The Moderator gave the outline of rules and procedures of Town Meeting members and announced the use 
of pro and con microphones when appropriate during the meeting. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator announced that that voters must be seated to be counted and that their stickers must be 
visible. 

The School Committee recognized Mr. Eric Nadworny, 8 Rogers Brook East, for his faithful service to the 
Town of Andover as an elected School Committee Member, having served as Chairman during his tenure 
and having retired with the election in March. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum not to exceed $830,000 for additional 
costs for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing the new public safety center including outside 
work and other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefore or take any other action related thereto. 

128 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

On request of the Director of Plant and Facilities 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $830,000 is hereby appropriated to pay 
additional costs of constructing, originally equipping and furnishing the new public safety center including 
outside work and other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(3 A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore. 

Article 10 was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 458 NO: 111 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum not to exceed $350,000 for additional 
costs for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing the new elementary and new middle schools 
including outside work and other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefore or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Building Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $350,000 is hereby appropriated to pay 
additional costs of constructing, originally equipping and furnishing the new elementary and new middle 
schools including outside work and other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow 
said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44 Sections 7(3) and 7(3 A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 11 was approved: 

VOTE: YES: 465 NO: 138 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,800,000 for the purpose of 
remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to West Elementary School, including the 
payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 7, clause 3(A) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefore or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 
129 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $1,800,000 is hereby appropriated to 
pay costs of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to West Elementary School, 
including the payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 3(A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 12 was approved: 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles or take any other action related 
thereto: 

13 A. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply 
for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to Andover by 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under any State or Federal grant program or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

13B. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with the 
Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the construction and 
maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

13C. To act upon the report of the Town officers or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

13D. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as 
amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax exemption for Fiscal Year 
2003 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
59, Section 5 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

13E. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of Schools to solicit and award 
contracts for terms exceeding three years, including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each 
instance the longer term is determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of 
Selectmen or the School Committee, as appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

130 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22. 23, 29, 30, 2002 

13F. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to accept 
grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the Board 
and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

13G. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to grant 
easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the Board and the 
Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

13H. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town Meetings or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to withdraw Article 13H by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve article 13E as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 13E by deleting "or the 
Superintendent of Schools" as printed in the Warrant. 

The amended motion on Article 13E was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

A second motion was made and duly seconded to amend Article 13E by deleting the words " for terms 
exceeding three years" and replacing it with " for terms exceeding three years but not to exceed five years". 

The second amended motion on Article 13 E was approved by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 363 NO: 181 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Articles 13A, 13B, 13C, 13D, 13F, 13G were approved as 
printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary easements by 
gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction or any other federal or 
state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 14 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 



131 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid 
bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town transfer from Free Cash and appropriate 
the sum of $1,475.95 to pay the following bill incurred in FY 2001 : Paul Schoolman, Chiropractor, for 
services to Police Department. 

Article 1 5 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared unanimous by the Moderator A 4/5 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to exceed 
$25,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled transportation subsidy program 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 16 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of 
$25,000 from taxation by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of 
$9,000 for the 2002 Independence Day fireworks celebration or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 1 7 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of 
$9,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $300,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit Account for funding 
accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities upon being eligible for retirement under the Andover 
Contributory Retirement System and terminating employment with the Town or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

132 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 18 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of 
$300,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for certain Town 
departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 2002 or take any other action related thereto: 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to 
Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


FY-2003 Limit 


A. Community 
Development & 
Planning 
Department 


Division Heads 


Advertising legal 
hearing notice 
expenses for permit 
applications 


Applicant Fees 


$30,000 


B. Title V - Health 
Division 


Public Health 
Director 


Inspections and 
testing associated 
with Title V septic 
system regulations 


Title V upgrade 
permit fee 


$20,000 


C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 
Director 


Clinic supplies and 
other expenses 


Clinic participant 
fees 


$5,000 


D. Division of 

Community 

Services 


Community 
Services Director 


Trips, ticket sales 
and special 
programs and 
activities 


Participant fees 


$250,000 


E. Division of 
Youth Services 


Youth Services 
Director 


All programs and 
activities expenses, 
part-time help 


Participant fees 


$150,000 


F. Field 
Maintenance 


Plant and Facilities 
Director 


Field maintenance, 
upgrade and related 

expenses 


Field rental fees 


$50,000 


G. Division of Elder 
Services 


Elder Services 
Director 


Senior programs, 
classes and activities 


Participant fees 


$100,000 


H. Public Safety 


Chief of Police 


Maintenance and 
purchase of public 
safety radio and 
antennae equipment 


Lease agreements 
for antenna users 


$50,000 



On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approved Article 1 9 as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority Vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of 
$18,000 for the purpose of leasing, purchasing, installing and maintaining holiday lights in the downtown 
area including, but not limited to, Elm Green, Andover Town House, Memorial Hall Library, Town Offices 
and the trees lining Main Street from Elm Square to Olde Andover Village or take any other action related 
thereto. 

133 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 20 as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $18,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 3 to Section 7, inclusive of Chapter 44B of 
the General Laws (the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act) and to approve a surcharge on real 
property of not more than three percent of the real estate tax levy against real property as determined 
annually by the Board of Assessors and to vote to accept one or more exemptions: 

(1) Exemption 1 - Property owned and occupied as a domicile by a person who would qualify for low 
income housing or low or moderate income senior housing in the Town; 

(2) Exemption 2 - For class three, commercial and class four, industrial properties as defined in Section 
2A of General Laws, Chapter 59; 

(3) Exemption 3 - For $ 1 00,000 of the value of each taxable parcel of residential real property, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town will vote to accept Section 3 to Section 7, 
inclusive of Chapter 44B of the General Laws (the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act) and to 
approve a surcharge on real property of ONE percent of the real estate tax levy against real property as 
determined annually by the Board of Assessors and to vote to accept the following exemptions: 

Exemption 1 - Property owned and occupied as a domicile by a person who would qualify for low 
income housing or low or moderate income senior housing in the Town; 

Exemption 3 - For $100,000 of the value of each taxable parcel of residential real property. 

An amendment was moved and seconded that the Town delete the term ONE percent (1%) and insert 
instead the term THREE percent (3%) so that the Article will read "a surcharge of THREE percent 

(3%). 

The amended motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 230 NO: 414 

Finance Committee Report: Disapprove 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approve at 1% 



134 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to add the following General Bylaw: 

Chapter 1 : Establishment 

There is hereby established a Community Preservation Committee, consisting of nine (9) voting members 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44B. The composition of the committee, the appointment 
authority and the term of office for the committee members shall be as follows: 

One member of the Conservation Commission as designated by the Commission for a term of three years. 

One member of the Preservation Commission as designated by the Commission for a term of three years. 

One member of the Planning Board as designated by the Board for a term of three years. 

One member to be appointed by the Town Manager, subject to the confirmation by the Board of Selectmen, 
representing the interest of parks and recreation for a term of one year and thereafter a term of three years. 

One member of the Andover Housing Partnership Committee as designated by the Committee for an initial 
term of one year and thereafter for a term of three years. 

One member of the Housing Authority as designated by the Authority for an initial term of two years and 
thereafter for a term of three years. 

Three members to be appointed by the Town Manager, subject to the confirmation by the Board of 
Selectmen, one member to be appointed for a term of one year and thereafter for a term of three years and 
two members to be appointed for a term of two years and thereafter for a term of three years. 

Should any of the Commissions, Boards or Committees who have appointment authority under this Chapter 
be no longer in existence for whatever reason, the appointment authority for that Commission, Board or 
Committee shall become the responsibility of the Town Manager subject to the confirmation of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

Chapter 2: Duties 

(1) The Community Preservation Committee shall study the needs, possibilities and resources of the 
Town regarding Community Preservation. The Committee shall consult with existing municipal boards, 
including the Conservation Commission, the Preservation Commission, the Planning Board, the Andover 
Housing Partnership Committee and the Housing Authority or persons acting in those capacities or 
performing like duties, in conducting such studies. As part of its study, the Committee shall hold one or 
more public informational hearings on the needs, possibilities and resources of the Town regarding 
Community Preservation possibilities and resources, notice of which shall be posted publicly and published 
for each of two weeks preceding a hearing in a newspaper of general circulation in the town. 

(2) The Community Preservation Committee shall make recommendations to the Town Meeting for the 
acquisition, creation and preservation of open space, for the acquisition and preservation of historic 
resources, for the acquisition, creation and preservation of land for recreational use, for the creation, 
preservation and support of community housing and for rehabilitation or restoration of such open space, 
historic resources, land for recreational use and community housing that is acquired or created as provided in 
this section. With respect to community housing, the Community Preservation Committee shall recommend, 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

wherever possible, the reuse of existing buildings or construction of new buildings on previously developed 
sites. 

(3) The Community Preservation Committee may include in its recommendation to the Town Meeting a 
recommendation to set aside for later spending funds for specific purposes that are consistent with 
Community Preservation but for which sufficient revenues are not then available in the Community 
Preservation Fund to accomplish that specific purpose or to set aside for later spending funds for general 
purposes that are consistent with Community Preservation. 

Chapter 3 : Requirement for a quorum and cost estimates 

The Community Preservation Committee shall not meet or conduct business without the presence of a 
quorum. A majority of the members of the Community Preservation Committee shall constitute a quorum. 
The Community Preservation Committee shall approve its action by majority vote. Recommendations to the 
Town Meeting shall include their anticipated costs. 

Chapter 4: Amendments 

This chapter may be amended from time to time by a majority vote of the Town Meeting, provided that the 
amendments would not cause a conflict to occur with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44B. 

Chapter 5: Severability 

In case any section, paragraph or part of this chapter be for any reason declared invalid or unconstitutional by 
any court of last resort, every other section, paragraph or part shall continue in full force and effect. 

Chapter 6: Effective Date 

Following Town Meeting approval, this Chapter shall take effect immediately upon approval by the Attorney 
General of the Commonwealth. Each appointing authority shall have forty-five (45) days after approval by 
the Attorney General to make their initial appointments. Should any appointing authority fail to make their 
appointment within that allotted time, the Town Manager shall make the appointment. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Article 22 was WITHDRAWN by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,500,000 for the acquisition of land 
for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire this land by gift, 
purchase or eminent domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $1,500,000 is hereby appropriated to 
pay costs of the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to 
acquire this land by gift, purchase or eminent domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor. 

Article 23 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a conveyance of 
Lot "Z" shown on a Plan of Land entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, MA entitled Douglass 
Crossing, dated January 13, 1997, revised March 31, 1997 by Merrimack Engineering Services", which Plan 
is recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 13137. A copy of said proposed Deed is on 
file at the Town Clerk's Office and is to be recorded at the Registry of Deeds, on terms and conditions 
acceptable to the Selectmen or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Stowe Development, Inc. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 24 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectman Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and 
control of a certain parcel of land on Heather Drive, owned by the Town of Andover, hereinafter described to 
the Selectmen of the Town of Andover, and for the express purpose of conveying the same in order to 
provide affordable housing, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as it is owned by the 
Town of Andover and upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen. Said parcel 
and interest is described as follows: Map 5, Parcel 92 or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Susan Stott and others 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved to accept Article 25 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 25 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 197 NO: 196 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:20 P.M., until Monday, April 29, 
2002 at 7:00 P.M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 
ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 2002 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 1 295 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:01 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit 41 (forty-one) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or cell phones in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to the 
warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Charles "Bucky" Dalton and reminded voters that they can go to 
Mr. Dalton for help, questions and for the three part forms to use in making their amendments to the 
Moderator in writing. 

The moderator gave the outline of rules and procedures of Town Meeting members and announced the use of 
pro and con microphones when appropriate during the meeting. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator announced that voters must be seated to be counted and that their stickers must be visible. 

The Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Ted Teichert, presented the second annual Virginia Cole Award to 
Margaret & Robert Pustel, 87 Porter Road, for their unwavering contributions to the Town in the area of land 
and resource conservation. 

Paul Salafia, Chairman of the Planning Board, presented retiring Planning Board member and long time 
Chairman, Michael Miller, 15 David Drive, with a plaque honoring his years of service to the Town. 

Town Manager, Reginald S. Stapczynski, announced that the Town had received its second Tree City USA 
designation and congratulated Joseph Piantedosi, Director of Plant & Facilities and his staff for their hard 
work in achieving their award. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept Nicholas Circle as a public way and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase, otherwise and fee, easement or other 
interest in land known as Nicholas Circle as shown on a plan entitled "SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND, in 
Andover, Mass." Owned by Corinna Construction Corp. dated August 20, 1982, as prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc. and recorded in the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8991 and on file in the Office of 
the Town Clerk, and as constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said acquisition, 
and to appropriate and raise by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or any combination 
thereof a sum of $22,000 for required engineering services, legal services, repairs and improvements to 
Nicholas Circle and expenses incidental thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

On request of Robert S. Martin and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to accept Nicholas Circle as a public way and authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase, otherwise and fee, easement or other 
interest in land known as Nicholas Circle as shown on a plan entitled "SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND, in 
Andover, Mass." Owned by Corinna Construction Corp. dated August 20, 1982, as prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc. and recorded in the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan #8991 and on file in the Office of 
the Town Clerk, and as constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said acquisition, 
and to transfer from Free Cash a sum of $22,000 for required engineering services, legal services, repairs and 
improvements to Nicholas Circle and expenses incidental thereto. 

Article 26 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will provide limited school choice at the middle school level for children 
in five crossover neighborhoods created by the 2002 school redisricting. The crossover neighborhoods are 
Ballardvale, River Street/Laconia Drive area, Elm Street area, Haggetts Pond area and Noel/Irongate area. 

On request of Michael Papa and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town will provide limited school choice at the 
middle school level for children in five crossover neighborhoods created by the 2002 school redisricting. 
The crossover neighborhoods are Ballardvale, River Street/Laconia Drive area, Elm Street area, Haggetts 
Pond area and Noel/Irongate area. The choice is limited to the Middle School crossover. School 
transportation would not be provided. 

Article 27 was DISAPPROVED by a Majority vote 

Board of Selectmen Report: No Position 
School Committee Report: No Position 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,060,000 for the purpose of 
remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to public buildings, including the payment of all 
costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7, clause 3(A) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefore or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved that the sum of $125,000 is hereby appropriated to pay costs 
of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to Town buildings, including the payment of 
all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

7, clause 3(A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefor. 

The motion was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $935,000 is hereby appropriated to pay 
costs of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to school buildings, including the 
payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 7, clause 3(A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

The motion was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

The total appropriation of the two motions is $1,060,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to delete the following language from Section 12 of the Code of 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, Article XIV, Wetland Protection Bylaw, at the start of the sixth paragraph, 
"Any person who violates any provision of this bylaw or regulations, permits or administrative orders issued 
thereunder shall be punished by a fine of not more than $300.", and add the following language in its place, 
"As an alternative to criminal prosecution in a specific case, the Commission may issue citations under the 
non-criminal disposition procedures set forth in Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 2 ID. Any 
person who violates any provision of this bylaw or regulations issued thereunder shall be punished by a fine 
of $200.", or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 29 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of 
$30,000 for the purpose of employing a consultant to assist the Vision 21 Committee in conducting a 
community-wide strategic planning process or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 30 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote 
in the amount of $5,000 from Free Cash. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into leases, 
agreements or licenses for a term up to and including ten years to allow third parties to use available space 
on the monopole on the new Public Safety building on North Main Street, on terms and conditions the Board 
of Selectmen deem to be in the best interest of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 3 1 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 31 was approved 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate a sum not to 
exceed $200,000 for the purpose of performing any necessary repairs and maintenance to foreclosed land 
and buildings located at 16 Haverhill Street, 7 Tantallon Road and 10 Tantallon Road as shown on 
Assessor's Map 35, Parcel 5A, 6 and 7 including legal and other costs incidental and related thereto or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Tax Collector/Treasurer 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 32 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of 
$200,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws, Article XII, Section 1 1(e) as 
follows: 

"Reclaiming impounded cats and dogs: An owner reclaiming an impounded cat or dog shall pay an 
administrative fee of twenty-five dollars ($25.00), plus up to fifteen dollars ($15.00), boarding charge for 
each day that the cat or dog has been impounded, plus up to one hundred fifty dollars ($150.00) for 
vaccinations and exams, to a total maximum of three hundred twenty-five dollars ($325.00)." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Department 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 33 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of 
$500,000 for the following purposes: Library HVAC system, Fire rescue tools and Police reverse 91 1 system 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 34 as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $410,000 for Library HVAC improvements from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 34 as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $25,000 for Fire Rescue Tools from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 34 as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $65,000 for the Police Reverse 91 1 System from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way any or all of the following 
five (5) streets: Noel Road, Bedford Place, Norwich Place, Somerset Drive and Suffolk Circle as further 
described below: 

■ Noel Road, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, entitled "Hyatt Crossing", 
dated April 20, 1 993 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 
Number 12272; 

■ Bedford Place, Norwich Place, Somerset Drive and Suffolk Circle, as shown on a plan approved by 
the Andover Planning Board, entitled "Somerset Village", dated June 13, 1995 (revised) and recorded 
in Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12692. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve that Noel Road, Bedford Place, Norwich 
Place, Somerset Drive and Suffolk Circle be accepted as Public Ways by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum not to exceed $300,000 
and appropriate to Assessor's Property Re-inspection Program for the purpose of interior inspection and 
measurement of residential, commercial and industrial property or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 36 a printed in the Warrant by a 
majority vote. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 22F to allow municipal boards or officers to fix reasonable fees for licenses, permits or certificates 
issued pursuant to statutes or regulations wherein the entire proceeds of the fee remains with the Town and 
may fix reasonable charges to be paid for any services rendered or work performed by the Town or any 
department thereof. Any fees adopted under this section shall be subject to the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen and will supersede fees or charges in effect or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 37 as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw by adding a new Section 
8.6 entitled "Historic Preservation Overlay District" to Article VIII, Section 8.0 as follows: 

"8.6. HISTORIC PRESERVATION OVERLAY DISTRICT 

8.6.1 Purpose 

There is hereby established a Historic Preservation Overlay District the purposes of which are to: 

a. Encourage preservation of buildings, structures, sites and settings and elements of historical 
or architectural significance. 

b. Allow in certain limited circumstances the relocation of historically significant buildings or 
structures to lots, which would otherwise not meet the dimensional requirements of the 
Bylaw. 

c. Allow in certain limited circumstances the creation of new lots on which to relocate 
historically significant buildings or structures, which would otherwise not meet the 
dimensional requirements of the Bylaw. 

d. Establish eligibility criteria for buildings, structures, sites and settings and elements as 
historically significant. 

e. Authorize the issuance of a Historic Preservation Special Permit permitting the modification 
of certain dimensional requirements for an existing lot on which a historically significant 
building or structure is to be relocated. 

f. Authorize the issuance of a Historic Preservation Special Permit permitting the modification 
of certain dimensional requirements for a newly created lot on which a historically significant 
building or structure is to be relocated. 

g. Create a new overlay zoning district (SRC-1) to which the above principles apply. 

8.6.2. The Historic Preservation Overlay District shall be designated as the Single Residence C-l District 
(SRC-1) and shall be an overlay district on land described as follows: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

The SRC-1 District shall be that portion of the land zoned SRC which is located as follows: The particular 
SRC zoning district is shown on the "Zoning Map Andover, Massachusetts 1 996" which is bounded on the 
northeast by the Andover/North Andover town line; bounded on the south by the North Reading town line 
and the APT zoning district abutting said North Reading town line; bounded on the southwest by the 
Wilmington town line; and bounded on the west by the easterly boundary of the Town of Andover' s most 
easterly SRB zoning districts, said boundary beginning at the intersection of the Wilmington/ Andover town 
line and ending at the Andover/North Andover town line. A copy of the zoning map is filed with the Town 
Clerk's office. 

8.6.3. Historically Significant Defined 

For purposes of a Historic Preservation Special Permit, a building or structure shall be considered 
"historically significant" if it satisfies any of the following criteria: 

1. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places; 

2. It is listed on the State (Commonwealth of Massachusetts) Register of Historic Places; 

3. It is listed on the Andover Historic Building Survey. 

8.6.4. Special Permit Authorized 

a. The Board of Appeals (SPGA) may, in its discretion, grant a Historic Preservation Special Permit to 
modify the following dimensional requirements of this Bylaw set forth in Appendix A, Table 2 
Section 4.1.2. Table of Dimensional Requirements, for land which is located in the SRC-1 zoning 
district and on which a "historically significant" building or structure is to be located: lot area; lot 
frontage; front, side and rear setbacks; maximum height and maximum lot coverage. 

b. The Board of Appeals (SPGA) may, in its discretion, grant a Historic Preservation Special Permit to 
modify the following dimensional requirements of this Bylaw set forth in Appendix A, Table 2 
Section 4.1.2. Table of Dimensional Requirements, with respect to an existing lot located in the SRC- 
1 overlay district or to allow the creation of a new lot which is located in the SRC-1 zoning district, 
on which a "historically significant" building or structure is to be located: lot area; lot frontage; 
front, side and rear setbacks; maximum height and maximum lot coverage. 

c. Findings Required: Before granting a Historic Preservation Special Permit, the SPGA shall 
determine: 

1 . That the modification of dimensional requirements is necessary to protect, preserve or 
maintain a historically significant building or structure; 

2. That the proposed work, including any relocation or reconstruction, preserves, to the 
maximum extent feasible, the historical and architectural features of the building or structure; 

3. That, in the absence of the granting of the Historic Preservation Special Permit, inappropriate 
physical modification or the destruction of an historically significant building or structure is 
likely to result; 

4. That the proposed work, including any relocation or reconstruction, will not substantially 
derogate from the character of the surrounding neighborhood; 

5. That the lot whose dimensions are to modified is located in the SRC-1 overlay district. 

6. The burden of proof is upon the applicant to satisfy the above findings. 

d. Any Special Permit shall also be subject to all of the provisions of Section 9.4. of this bylaw." 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Michael Ristuccia and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 38 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 2.2 (Overlay Districts) of the 
Andover Zoning Bylaw by adding "Historic Preservation Overlay District" or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of Michael Ristuccia and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 39 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to add the following to the Andover Code of Bylaws: 

1. Authority 

This Bylaw is adopted by the Town under its police powers to protect public health and welfare and 
its powers under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 21 et seq. and implements the Town's 
authority to regulate water use pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41, Section 69B. This 
bylaw also implements the Town's authority under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 41 A, 
conditioned upon a declaration of water supply emergency issued by the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection. 

2. Purpose 

The purpose of this bylaw is to protect, preserve and maintain public health, safety and welfare 
whenever there is in force a State of Water Supply Conservation or State of Water Supply Emergency by 
providing for enforcement of any duly imposed restrictions, requirements, provisions or conditions imposed 
by the Town or by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. 

3. Definitions 

Person - Shall mean any individual, corporation, trust, partnership or association, or other entity. 

Public Water Supply System - Shall mean the Andover Municipal Water Supply System withdrawing water 
from Haggetts Pond. 

State of Water Supply Emergency - Shall mean a State of Water Supply Emergency declared by the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 21G, 
Sections 15 - 17. 

State of Water Supply Conservation - Shall mean a State of Water Supply Conservation declared by the 
Town pursuant to Section 4 of this bylaw. 

Water Users or Water Consumers - Shall mean all public and private users of the Town's public water 
system, irrespective of any person's responsibility for billing purposes for water used at any particular 
facility/location. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Director - Shall mean the Director of Public Works for the Town of Andover. 

4. Declaration of State of Water Supply Conservation 

The Town, through the Board of Selectmen, may declare a State of Water Supply Conservation 
within the Town's Public Water Supply System upon a determination by the Director that a shortage of water 
exists and conservation measures are appropriate to ensure an adequate supply of water to all water 
consumers. Public notice of a State of Water Supply Conservation shall be given under Section 6 of this 
bylaw before it may be enforced. 

5. Restricted Water Uses 

A declaration of a State of Water Supply Conservation may include one or more of the following 
restrictions, conditions or requirements limiting the use of water either Town-wide or as limited by the 
Selectmen as necessary to protect the public water supply. The applicable restrictions, conditions or 
requirements shall be included in the Public Notice required under Section 6. 

1 . Outdoor Water Use Hours - Outdoor water use by water users is permitted only during daily 
periods of low demand, at night or early morning. 

2. Odd/Even Day Outdoor Water Use - Outdoor water use by water users with odd numbered 
addresses is restricted to odd numbered days. Outdoor water use by water users with even 
numbered addresses is restricted to even number days. 

3. Outdoor Water Use Ban - Outdoor water use by water users is prohibited. 

4. Filling Swimming Pools - Filling of swimming pools is prohibited. 

5. Automatic Sprinkler Use - The use of automatic sprinkler systems is prohibited. 

6. Public Notification of State of Water Supply Conservation 

Notification of any provision, restriction, requirement or condition imposed by the Town as part of a 
State of Water Supply Conservation shall be published in a newspaper of general circulation within the 
Town, or by such other means reasonably calculated to reach and inform all users of Town water of the State 
of Water Supply Conservation. Any restriction imposed under Section 5 shall not be effective until such 
notification is provided. Notification of the State of Water Supply Conservation shall also be simultaneously 
provided to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. 

7. Termination of State of Water Supply Conservation: Notice 

A State of Water Supply Conservation may be terminated by vote of the Board of Selectmen upon a 
determination that the water supply shortage no longer exists. Public notification of the termination of a 
State of Water Supply Conservation shall be given in the same manner required by Section 6. 

8. State of Water Supply Emergency: Compliance with PEP Orders 

Upon notification to the public that the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection has 
issued a State of Water Supply Emergency, no person shall violate any provision, restriction, requirement or 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

condition or any order approved or issued by the Department intended to bring about an end to the State of 
Water Supply Emergency. 

9. Violation and Penalties 

Any person violating this bylaw shall be subject to a warning for the first offense and thereafter shall 
be liable to the Town in the amount of $50.00 for the second violation and $100.00 for each subsequent 
violation, which shall inure to the Town for such uses as the Board of Selectmen may direct. Fines shall be 
recovered by indictment, or on complaint before the District Court, or by non-criminal disposition in 
accordance with Section 2 ID of Chapter 40 of the provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws. For 
purposes of non-criminal disposition, the enforcing person(s) shall be any police officer of the Town of 
Andover. Each day of violation shall constitute a separate offense. 

10. Severability 

The invalidity of any portion or provision of this bylaw shall not invalidate any other portion or 
provision thereof. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 40 as printed in the Warrant by 
a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectman Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to add the following the Andover Code of Bylaws: 

1. Registration 

All automatic lawn irrigation systems connected to the municipal water system of the Town of 
Andover shall be registered with the Department of Public Works (DPW). 

2. Backflow Prevention 

The Town shall be protected from a backflow condition from all automatic lawn irrigation systems 
connected to the municipal water system by the installation of a backflow prevention device approved by the 
Department of Public Works. Each backflow prevention device shall be registered with the Department of 
Public Works. 

All new or existing residential, municipal, commercial and industrial property owners are required to 
install or have in place, a backflow prevention device on their automatic lawn irrigation system. The 
installation shall be in compliance with 310 CMR 22.22. These devices must be installed on the discharge 
side of the water meter, preferably indoors, but can be located outside provided they can be removed easily 
to protect them from damage by freezing. 

Reduced Pressure Zone and Pressure Vacuum Breaker type devices shall be tested upon initial 
installation and thereafter in accordance with 310 CMR 22.22. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

3. Rain Sensors 

Installation of new automatic lawn irrigation systems connected to the municipal water supply in the 
Town shall be equipped with a rain sensor approved by the Department of Public Works so that watering 
will be automatically prevented during or after a rain storm. 

Any upgrade or repair of an existing automatic lawn irrigation system shall include the installation of 
an approved rain sensor if the same is not already installed and in good working condition. 

The Department of Public Works shall maintain a list, available to the public, of approved rain 
sensors. 

4. Violations and Penalties 

Any person violating this bylaw shall be subject to a warning for the first offense and thereafter shall 
be liable to the Town in the amount of $50.00 for the second violation, and $100 for each subsequent 
violation, which shall inure to the Town for such uses as the Board of Selectmen may direct. Fines shall be 
recovered by indictment, or on complaint before the District Court, or by non-criminal disposition in 
accordance with Section 2 ID of Chapter 40 of the provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws. For 
purposes of non-criminal disposition, the enforcing person(s) shall be any police officer of the Town. Each 
day of violation shall constitute a separate offense. 

5. Severability 

The invalidity of any portion or provision of the Bylaw shall not invalidate any other portion or 
provision thereof. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 41 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by 
any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate a sum not to exceed $975,000 for the purpose of 
improvements to the Robert E. McQuade Water Treatment Plant, including but not limited to design and 
upgrade of the ozone facility, office construction, filter units and costs incidental and related thereto, and that 
to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow a sum not to exceed $975,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 (4) and 8 (7C) of the 
General Laws as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
therefore or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $975,000 is hereby appropriated to pay 
costs of improvements to the Robert E. McQuade Water Treatment Plant, including but not limited to design 
and upgrade of the ozone facility, office construction, filter backwash tank and costs incidental and related 
thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 8 (4) and 8 (7C) of the General Laws as 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

amended and supplemented, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes therefor. 

Article 42 was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 805 NO: 260 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of laying 
and re-laying water mains of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter and for costs 
incidental and related thereto and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by 
gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(5) of the 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $500,000 is hereby appropriated to pay 
costs of laying and re-laying water mains of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter 
and for costs incidental and related thereto and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 8(5) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor. 

Article 43 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $225,000 from Sewer Reserves and 
$100,000 from Water Reserves and appropriate the sum of $50,000 for the hydrant replacement program, 
$75,000 for GIS and $200,000 for the sanitary sewer system inflow and infiltration detection and removal 
program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Public Works 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was it was voted that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $225,000 
from Sewer Reserves and $100,000 from Water Reserves and appropriate the sum of $50,000 for the hydrant 
replacement program, $75,000 for GIS and $200,000 for the sanitary sewer system inflow and infiltration 
detection and removal program by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectman Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw pursuant to 2.3 (District 
Boundaries) and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map of Andover, Mass. to re-zone to Industrial 
D District (ED) from Single Family Residence C (SRC) those parcels of land situated on the westerly side of 
Haggetts Pond Road being more particularly shown as Lot A-l and Lot B-l and Road A on a Plan of Land 
entitled "Proposed Re-Zoning Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, Haggetts Pond Road, dated January 
23, 2001, prepared by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. (a copy of which is on file with the office of the Town Clerk). 
Said parcel of land being a portion of Lot 6 on Town of Andover' s Assessor's Map 219; Lot 2 A, Assessor's 
Map 221; Lot 2 on Assessor's Map 227. 

On request of Andover Little League and Yvon Cormier Construction Corp. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 46 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 45 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 423 NO: 739 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectman Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town of Andover will authorize the Selectmen to enter into a municipal 
agreement or agreements with the Town of Tewksbury for providing water service to the property off of 
Haggett's Pond Road and shown as Parcel 2 on Assessor's Map 227; Parcel 2A on Assessor's Map 221; 
Parcel 6 on Assessor's Map 219, portion of which are shown on Assessor's Map 221 and Assessor's Map 
226; Parcel 1 on Assessor's Map 219; Parcel 12 on Assessor's Map 220 or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of Yvon Cormier Construction Corp. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 46 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 46 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectman Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town of Andover will authorize the Selectmen to enter into a municipal 
agreement or agreements with the Town of Tewksbury and/or the City of Lowell for providing sewer to the 
property off of Haggett's Pond Road and shown as Parcel 2 on Assessor's Map 227; Parcel 2A on Assessor's 
Map 221; Parcel 6 on Assessor's Map 219, portions of which are shown on Assessor's Map 221 and 
Assessor's Map 226; Parcel 1 on Assessor's Map 219; Parcel 12 on Assessor's Map 220. 

On request of Yvon Cormier Construction Corp. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 47 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 47 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectman Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: No Position 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:14 P.M., until Tuesday, April 30, 
2002 at 7:00 P.M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, 2002 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 424 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:01 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit 14 (fourteen) non- voters to the meeting and to escort non- voters 
to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or cell phones in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of 
the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to the 
warrant articles by number and subject matter 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Charles "Bucky" Dalton and reminded voters that they can go to 
Mr. Dalton for help, questions and for the three part forms to use in making their amendments to the 
Moderator in writing. 

The Moderator gave the outline of rules and procedures of Town Meeting members and announced the use 
of pro and con microphones when appropriate during the meeting. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator announced that that voters must be seated to be counted and that their stickers must be 
visible. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the purpose of making 
streetscape and pedestrian safety improvements including but not limited to the acquisition and installation 
of street lights, trees, detailed engineering drawings, upgraded materials for sidewalks and crosswalks, 
landscaping and costs incidental and related to the Main Street Reconstruction Project undertaken by the 
Town in accordance with the terms of a $2.5 million dollar Massachusetts Highway Department grant, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and accept any other State or Federal grants that may be 
available for this purpose and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to MGL Chapter 44, Section 7, 
Clauses 5 and 9 or any other enabling authority and to issue bonds and notes of the Town thereof or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Main Street Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was move that the sum of $269,500 is hereby appropriated to pay 
costs of making streetscape and pedestrian safety improvements, including but not limited to the acquisition 
and installation of street lights, trees, detailed engineering drawings, upgraded materials for sidewalks and 
crosswalks, landscaping and costs incidental and related to the Main Street Reconstruction Project 
undertaken by the Town in accordance with the terms of a $2.5 million dollar Massachusetts Highway 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22. 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Department grant, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for and accept any other State or Federal 
grants that may be available for this purpose and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to MGL 
Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses 5 and 9 or pursuant to any other enabling authority and to issue bonds and 
notes of the Town therefor. 



Article 48 was approved. 

VOTE: 

Finance Committee Report: 
Board of Selectman Report: 
Planning Board Report: 



YES: 251 

Disapproval 

Approval 

Approval 



NO: 101 



A 2/3 Vote Required 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Off-Street Parking Reserve Fund and 
appropriate the sum of $30,000 for repair and improvements to the Olde Andover Village and Memorial Hall 
Library parking lots or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the Town transfer from the Off-Street Parking 
Reserve Fund and appropriate the sum of $30,000 for repair and improvements to the Olde Andover Village 
and Memorial Hall Library parking lots by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectman Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $28,61 1 from Article 29 of the 1997 
Annual Town Meeting and $93,500 from Free Cash and appropriate $122,1 1 1 for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing traffic signals and appurtenant equipment and for making surface improvements, including 
granite curbing, sidewalks, crosswalks, and catch basins at the intersection of Dascomb Road, Lovejoy Road, 
and Acorn Drive, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, 
purchase or eminent domain or any other enabling authority or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $28,61 1 from 
Article 29 of the 1997 Annual Town Meeting and $93,500 from Free Cash and appropriate $122,1 1 1 for the 
purpose of purchasing and installing traffic signals and appurtenant equipment and for making surface 
improvements, including granite curbing, sidewalks, crosswalks, and catch basins at the intersection of 
Dascomb Road, Lovejoy Road, and Acorn Drive, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any 
necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain or any other enabling authority. 



Article 50 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 vote by the Moderator 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectman Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

152 



A 2/3 vote is Required 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of 
$26,000 to undertake construction of traffic calming and pedestrian safety improvements in Ballardvale or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On the request of the Ballardvale/Lowell Junction Area Traffic Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 51 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 7.6.2. of the Zoning Bylaw by adding thereto 
subsection 7.6.2.4. as follows: 

"4. The building may not be increased in area, footprint, height or otherwise enlarged beyond the existing 
framework, except as may be necessary for secondary egress in the form of an outside stairway." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Andover Housing Partnership Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 52 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 52 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3.1 of the Andover Zoning Bylaw by 
inserting into the first sentence after the word "Laws" the following language, "or by variance of the Board 
of Appeals, as provided in said Chapter 40A of the General Laws and in 9.2.2.2 of this bylaw" or take any 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 53 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 53 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4.1.4.2.b of the Andover Zoning Bylaw by 
inserting the word "front" before the word "setback" in both places or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 
Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 54 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Article 54 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3.3.5.1 and 3.3.5.2 of the Andover Zoning 
Bylaw by inserting the following language "but is located" before the words "on a lot" and insert the 
following language after the end of Section 3.3.5.3 and by adding an Appendix titled "Appendix B: 
Illustrations": 

"4. alteration to the side or face of a structure which encroaches upon a required setback area, where the 
alteration will not encroach upon such area to a distance greater than the existing structure (the provisions of 
this clause shall apply regardless of whether the lot complies with current area and frontage requirements). 

5. alteration to a non-conforming structure which will not increase the footprint of the existing structure 
provided that existing height restrictions shall not be exceeded." 

or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 55 was WITHDRAWN by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to change the use of the land under the control of the 
Conservation Commission shown on Assessors Map 81, Lot 1, near Belknap Drive, to allow the 
Conservation Commission to grant a sewer easement approximately 200 feet in length and 30 feet wide to 
the Town under the control of the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of installing a sewer line within the 
easement and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept said easement and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation to accomplish the foregoing or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 56 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 56 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw (Signs - General Business) by 
adding the following subsection: 

"5.2.10.7 Use of internally illuminated signs is prohibited." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Ann Constantine and others 
154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 57 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 57 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to rezone parcels 84-10, 84-1 1, 84-12, 84-13, 84-14 and 84-15 
from Residential C to Apartment or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Thomas Silvestro and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 58 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 58 was Disapproved. 

VOTE: Declared LOST by more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to amend Zoning Bylaw Article VIII, Section 7.3.4. by deleting 
subsection 1 and replacing it with the following: "Each lot shall not be less than 3 acres" or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of Yvon Cormier Construction Corp. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 59 be WITHDRAWN. 

The motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 59 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Article 59 was DISAPPROVED. 

VOTE: Declared LOST by more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to confirm and accept the layout of a portion of Main Street 
from Wheeler Avenue to Elm Street as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Main Street in the Town of 
Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, Laid out by the Board of Selectmen, dated January 18, 2002" for the 
purpose of reconstructing the road and sidewalks as part of the proposed Main Street Reconstruction Project 



155 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase or otherwise any 
necessary fee, easement or other interest or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 60 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 60 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: No Position 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to alter the layout of a portion of Pearson Street at the 
intersection of North Main Street as shown on a plan entitled "Plan Showing Alteration of Layout, Pearson 
Street, Andover, Mass.; Prepared for: Town of Andover; Date: January 18, 2002" for the purpose of 
reconstructing the road and sidewalks as part of the proposed Main Street Reconstruction Project and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase or other any necessary fee, 
easement or other interest to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 61 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 61 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to take by eminent domain for 
general municipal purposes the existing roadway, known as Ledge Road and to award no damages; said 
Ledge Road runs in a generally northerly direction from its commencement at Greenwood Road to its 
termination at Chandler Road, all as more particularly shown on a certain parcel of land entitled "Survey of 
Land in Andover, Mass. Made for Town of Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', April 1941" said plan being 
duly recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 1334. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 62 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 62 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

156 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 22, 23, 29, 30, 2002 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the existing public way known as Ledge Road, 
said Ledge Road runs in a generally northerly direction from its commencement at Greenwood Road to its 
termination at Chandler Road, all as more particularly shown on a certain plan of land entitled "Survey of 
Land in Andover, Mass. Made for Town of Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 100' April, 1941", said plan being 
duly recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 1334. Said Ledge Road is to 
be discontinued as a public way but is to be used for such purposes as the Selectmen may deem advisable or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 63 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 63 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority 
vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 8:35 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



157 



160 


362 


376 


302 


281 


338 


363 


439 


357 


3278 


94 


63 


73 


86 


54 


74 


74 


97 


79 


694 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 





3 


1 


13 



52 


55 


64 


65 


51 


62 


61 


61 


56 


527 


3 


4 


3 


2 





2 


4 


2 


5 


25 


195 


151 


140 


108 


105 


130 


149 


174 


124 


1276 


246 


151 


176 


138 


118 


146 


159 


230 


183 


1547 


48 


64 


54 


72 


55 


68 


61 


63 


64 


549 


10 


2 


14 


4 


7 


6 


3 


9 


5 


60 


1 


























1 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/17/2002 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT 9 Totals 
Democratic Party Total: 3,985 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

JOHN F KERRY 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 555 427 451 389 336 414 437 539 437 3985 

GOVERNOR 

THOMAS F BIRMINGHAM 

STEVEN GROSSMAN 

SHANNON P O'BRIEN 

ROBERT B REICH 

WARREN E TOLMAN 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 555 427 451 389 336 414 437 539 437 3985 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

CHRISTOPHER GABRIELI 

LOIS G PINES 

JOHN P SLATTERY 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

THOMAS F REILLY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

WILLIAM F GALVIN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

TREASURER 

MICHAEL P CAHILL 
TIMOTHY P CAHILL 
STEPHEN J MURPHY 
JAMES W SEGEL 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

AUDITOR 

A JOSEPH DeNUCCI 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REP. IN CONGRESS 

MARTIN T MEEHAN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

COUNCILLOR 

MARY-ELLEN MANNING 

LOUIS JAMES CONNOLLY 

MARK E TUTTLE 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

158 



197 


186 


163 


142 


111 


181 


150 


183 


133 


1446 


170 


125 


123 


124 


109 


122 


136 


174 


161 


1244 


87 


73 


84 


84 


56 


61 


102 


106 


78 


731 


101 


43 


81 


39 


60 


50 


49 


76 


65 


564 
































555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


412 


346 


329 


286 


249 


315 


333 


405 


326 


3001 


143 


81 


122 


103 


86 


97 


104 


132 


111 


979 














1 


2 





2 





5 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


393 


327 


312 


275 


237 


301 


312 


388 


319 


2864 


162 


100 


139 


114 


99 


113 


125 


150 


118 


1120 























1 





1 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


91 


94 


81 


66 


47 


57 


82 


78 


65 


661 


118 


128 


127 


131 


102 


135 


117 


141 


120 


1119 


34 


34 


36 


44 


32 


40 


43 


39 


30 


332 


155 


115 


102 


86 


76 


109 


101 


161 


139 


1044 


157 


56 


105 


62 


79 


71 


94 


120 


83 


827 

















2 











2 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


362 


315 


291 


259 


216 


286 


294 


351 


279 


2653 


193 


112 


160 


130 


119 


127 


143 


187 


157 


1328 














1 


1 





1 


1 


4 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


419 


328 


332 


278 


258 


303 


333 


409 


327 


2987 


135 


98 


117 


111 


78 


107 


104 


129 


110 


989 


1 


1 


2 








4 





1 





9 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


205 


175 


151 


130 


84 


136 


140 


179 


131 


1331 


113 


122 


124 


134 


123 


125 


130 


121 


134 


1126 


34 


24 


21 


13 


19 


25 


23 


35 


31 


225 


203 


106 


155 


112 


110 


127 


144 


204 


141 


1302 

















1 











1 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/17/2002 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT9 Totals 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

SUSAN C TUCKER 

Blanks 

MARIA MORASCO 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

BARRY R FINEGOLD 
MICHAEL A FRISHMAN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

BARBARA A LTTALIEN 
KEVIN BRYAN SHEA 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

JONATHAN W BLODGETT 

JOHN J BURKE 

RICK GRUNDY 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 

PAMELA CASEY O'BRIEN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 



458 


351 


350 


308 


264 


333 


350 


443 


353 


3210 


96 


76 


100 


80 


72 


77 


86 


91 


80 


758 


1 





1 


1 





3 


1 


3 


2 


12 

















1 





2 


2 


5 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 





299 


322 


286 


251 


307 








328 


1793 





114 


97 


86 


66 


91 








83 


537 





14 


32 


17 


19 


16 








26 


124 



































427 


451 


389 


336 


414 








437 


2454 


425 

















327 


409 





1161 


73 

















74 


95 





242 


55 

















36 


35 





126 


2 


























2 


555 

















437 


539 





1531 


89 


77 


95 


67 


58 


83 


84 


93 


74 


720 


347 


294 


282 


252 


204 


251 


268 


347 


288 


2533 


33 


24 


22 


28 


16 


22 


22 


39 


18 


224 


86 


32 


52 


42 


58 


57 


63 


60 


57 


507 

















1 











1 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 


353 


319 


289 


257 


212 


281 


294 


342 


279 


2626 


202 


107 


162 


132 


123 


132 


143 


197 


158 


1356 





1 








1 


1 











3 


555 


427 


451 


389 


336 


414 


437 


539 


437 


3985 



Republican Party Total: 2,131 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Blanks 

MARIA MORASCO 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

GOVERNOR 

MITT ROMNEY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

KERRY MURPHY HEALEY 
JIM RAPPAPORT 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

JACK E ROBINSON, HI 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 



259 


200 


218 


203 


150 


209 


208 


307 


261 


2015 


8 


2 


12 


1 


3 


10 


3 


15 


8 


62 


5 


3 


15 


3 


4 


5 





11 


8 


54 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


248 


185 


222 


188 


145 


204 


189 


305 


255 


1941 


22 


19 


23 


19 


11 


20 


22 


27 


22 


185 


2 


1 








1 








1 





5 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


194 


133 


149 


142 


104 


148 


123 


227 


196 


1416 


71 


68 


90 


64 


49 


72 


86 


101 


79 


680 


7 


4 


6 


1 


4 


4 


2 


5 


2 


35 
































272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


267 


205 


242 


206 


156 


223 


211 


330 


275 


2115 


5 





3 


1 


1 


1 





3 


2 


16 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


129 


107 


123 


99 


76 


102 


109 


149 


134 


1028 


141 


98 


121 


108 


80 


122 


102 


184 


143 


1099 


2 





1 





1 














4 


272 


205 


245 


207 


150 57 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/17/2002 
PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT 9 Totals 



TREASURER 

DANIEL A GRABAUSKAS 
BRUCE A HERZFELDER 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

AUDITOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

rep. in congress 

charles McCarthy 
thomas p tierney 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

COUNCILLOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Blanks 

MARIA MORASCO 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

KATHLEEN R SACHS 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

Libertarian Party Total: 10 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

MICHAEL E CLOUD 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

GOVERNOR 

CARLA A HOWELL 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 



141 


109 


119 


106 


72 


116 


107 


160 


146 


1076 


80 


58 


81 


76 


57 


67 


73 


116 


93 


701 


51 


38 


44 


25 


28 


41 


31 


57 


38 


353 








1 




















1 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


271 


205 


243 


207 


157 


224 


211 


331 


277 


2126 


1 





2 














2 





5 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


108 


104 


107 


97 


72 


108 


103 


130 


142 


971 


106 


64 


84 


72 


53 


67 


65 


124 


84 


719 


57 


37 


54 


38 


32 


49 


43 


79 


51 


440 


1 


























1 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


271 


205 


244 


207 


157 


224 


211 


331 


277 


2127 


1 





1 














2 





4 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


201 


177 


198 


166 


132 


184 


158 


229 


210 


1655 


70 


28 


47 


41 


25 


34 


53 


104 


66 


468 


1 














6 








1 


8 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 





204 


244 


207 


157 


222 








271 


1305 





1 


1 








2 








6 


10 





205 


245 


207 


157 


224 








277 


1315 


155 

















122 


189 





466 


115 

















87 


141 





343 


2 

















2 


3 





7 


272 

















211 


333 





816 


267 


202 


242 


207 


156 


220 


211 


330 


277 


2112 


5 


3 


3 





1 


4 





3 





19 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 


271 


205 


244 


207 


157 


224 


211 


331 


277 


2127 


1 





1 














2 





4 


272 


205 


245 


207 


157 


224 


211 


333 


277 


2131 



2 


7 





3 








2 


10 


2 


8 





2 








2 


10 



160 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/17/2002 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT 3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT 9 Totals 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 






















RICHARD P AUCOIN 


2 


1 














1 


1 


2 


7 


Blanks 


1 








1 


1 














3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 








1 


1 


2 


9 


Misc. Others 














1 














1 


TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


TREASURER 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


AUDITOR 






















KAMAL JAIN 


2 


1 














1 


1 


2 


7 


Blanks 


1 








1 


1 














3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















ILANA FREEDMAN 


2 

















1 


1 


2 


6 


Blanks 


1 


1 





1 


1 














4 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT - 17th 






















Blanks 





1 





1 


1 











2 


5 


Misc. Others 
TOTALS 



































1 





1 


1 











2 


5 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT - 18th 






















Blanks 


3 

















1 


1 





5 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 

















1 


1 





5 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


REGISTER OF PROBATE 






















Blanks 


3 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


10 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


3 


1 





1 


-1 





1 


1 


2 


10 



161 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/17/2002 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT 9 Totals 



Green Party Total: 3 






















SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


GOVERNOR 






















JILL E STEIN 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 






















ANTHONY F LORENZEN 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


TREASURER 






















JAMES O'KEEFE 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


AUDITOR 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 


1 


1 











1 











3 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


1 











1 











3 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT- 17th 






















Blanks 





1 











1 











2 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 





1 











1 











2 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT - 18th 






















Blanks 


1 


























1 


Misc. Others 
































TOTALS 


1 


























1 



162 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRIMARY ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/17/2002 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT 9 Totals 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 



1 


1 























2 

















1 











1 


1 


1 











1 











3 


1 


1 























2 

















1 











1 


1 


1 











1 











3 



163 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR GENERAL ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 11/05/2002 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 PCT 9 TOTALS 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

JOHN F KERRY 
MICHAEL E CLOUD 
RANDALL FORSBERG 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

GOVERNOR & LT.GOVERNOR 

HOWELL & AUCOIN 
O'BRIEN & GABRIEU 
ROMNEY & HEALEY 
STEIN & LORENZEN 
JOHNSON & SCHEBEL 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

THOMAS F REILLY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

WILLIAM F GALVIN 
JACK E ROBINSON, III 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

TREASURER 

TIMOTHY P CAHILL 
DANIEL A GRABAUSKAS 
JAMES O'KEEFE 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

AUDITOR 

A JOSEPH DeNUCCI 

KAMAL JAIN 

JOHN JAMES XENAKIS 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

REP. IN CONGRESS 

MARTIN T MEEHAN 
ILANA FREEDMAN 
CHARLES MCCARTHY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

COUNCILLOR 

MARY-ELLEN MANNING 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 



1030 


960 


1043 


859 


999 


1012 


996 


1157 


1034 


9090 


290 


294 


332 


303 


328 


344 


329 


393 


370 


2983 


35 


10 


9 


8 


8 


1 


15 


20 


9 


115 


153 


166 


143 


148 


156 


186 


166 


227 


171 


1516 





5 


1 


1 


4 


2 


10 


7 


4 


34 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


14 


8 


13 


7 


7 


11 


8 


13 


9 


90 


614 


501 


474 


392 


437 


437 


502 


570 


455 


4382 


786 


852 


950 


865 


997 


1028 


946 


1136 


1068 


8628 


73 


56 


74 


39 


43 


51 


50 


72 


46 


504 


12 


11 


7 


7 


8 


10 


5 


6 


4 


70 


9 


6 


9 


9 


3 


8 


5 


7 


6 


62 





1 


1 




















2 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


1050 


983 


1071 


936 


1014 


1033 


1047 


1162 


1061 


9357 


450 


446 


450 


383 


470 


512 


459 


627 


516 


4313 


8 


6 


7 





11 





10 


15 


11 


68 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


938 


841 


933 


800 


852 


864 


887 


1042 


906 


8063 


424 


443 


437 


388 


489 


479 


488 


569 


498 


4215 


145 


150 


158 


131 


153 


202 


139 


190 


183 


1451 


1 


1 








1 





2 


3 


1 


9 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


574 


500 


550 


467 


503 


483 


525 


580 


530 


4712 


723 


780 


799 


712 


816 


865 


819 


1031 


883 


7428 


121 


65 


90 


56 


76 


74 


83 


90 


71 


726 


90 


90 


89 


84 


100 


123 


89 


103 


104 


872 
































1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


951 


876 


919 


810 


850 


891 


911 


1036 


916 


8160 


99 


98 


130 


101 


129 


134 


119 


133 


123 


1066 


211 


216 


242 


187 


245 


236 


241 


304 


272 


2154 


247 


245 


237 


221 


271 


284 


242 


329 


276 


2352 




















3 


2 


1 


6 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


867 


743 


775 


668 


778 


753 


806 


927 


786 


7103 


59 


69 


101 


55 


64 


95 


56 


64 


86 


649 


516 


567 


592 


537 


589 


620 


585 


716 


649 


5371 


64 


55 


59 


59 


63 


77 


67 


96 


67 


607 


2 


1 


1 





1 





2 


1 





8 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


896 


841 


909 


773 


840 


840 


909 


978 


877 


7863 


606 


589 


612 


546 


646 


705 


602 


818 


702 


5826 


6 


5 


7 





9 





5 


8 


9 


49 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 



164 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

SUSAN C TUCKER 
MARIA MARASCO 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

BARRY R FINEGOLD 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT 

BARBARA A L'lTALIEN 
KATHLEEN R SACHS 
ALFRED J DEPIETRO 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

JONATHAN W BLODGETT 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

REGISTER OF PROBATE 

PAMELA CASEY O'BRIEN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
TOTALS 

QUESTION 1 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

QUESTION 2 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

QUESTION 3 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 

QUESTION 4 - MARIJUANA 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 



923 


829 


856 


708 


772 


820 


809 


974 


833 


7524 


532 


556 


624 


563 


668 


651 


666 


772 


702 


5734 


53 


50 


47 


45 


55 


74 


40 


58 


53 


475 








1 


3 








1 








5 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 





1023 


1085 


942 


1045 


1047 








1110 


6252 





405 


432 


375 


441 


498 








468 


2619 





7 


11 


2 


9 











10 


39 





1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 








1588 


8910 


951 

















793 


964 





2708 


460 

















603 


697 





1760 


35 

















33 


41 





109 


62 

















86 


102 





250 




















1 








1 


1508 

















1516 


1804 





4828 


934 


856 


944 


805 


862 


877 


935 


1020 


918 


8151 


566 


572 


577 


514 


627 


667 


580 


776 


664 


5543 


8 


7 


7 





6 


1 


1 


8 


6 


44 


1508 





1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


926 


859 


959 


792 


856 


873 


910 


1001 


910 


8086 


578 


571 


562 


526 


634 


672 


602 


795 


672 


5612 


4 


5 


7 


1 


5 





4 


8 


6 


40 


1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


590 


603 


640 


612 


721 


724 


697 


769 


743 


6099 


760 


708 


765 


619 


688 


712 


710 


889 


735 


6586 


158 


124 


123 


88 


86 


109 


109 


146 


110 


1053 
































1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


990 


1026 


1108 


993 


1122 


1171 


1068 


1286 


1189 


9953 


427 


318 


365 


280 


340 


329 


373 


419 


358 


3209 


91 


91 


55 


46 


33 


45 


75 


99 


41 


576 
































1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


517 


342 


430 


350 


419 


423 


423 


546 


442 


3892 


906 


983 


1005 


904 


1010 


1048 


1010 


1142 


1075 


9083 


85 


110 


93 


65 


66 


74 


83 


116 


71 


763 
































1508 


1435 


1528 


1319 


1495 


1545 


1516 


1804 


1588 


13738 


879 

















863 


1020 





2762 


502 

















540 


640 





1682 


127 

















113 


144 





384 
































1508 

















1516 


1804 





4828 



165 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Health Director 
Planning Director 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 
Veterans Service Agent 

Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Youth Services Director 



Everett F. Penney, Jr. 

Stephen L. Colyer 

James A. Greer 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Richard J. Salenas 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Jeanne M. Madden 

Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

Bruce A. Symmes 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

John C. Doherty 

Charles H. Mumane, Jr. 

Christine L. Metzemaekers 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Kenneth H. Parker 

Randy H. Pickersgill 

Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

William D. Fahey 



166 



^^"j^ 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 



AS OF DECEMBER 31 


,2002 






ELECTED 






BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Raymond E. Hender, Ch. 


-2004 


Tina B. Girdwood, Ch. 


-2004 


John P. Hess 


-2004 


Frank Eccles 


-2003 


Mary K. Lyman 


-2005 


Richard J. Collins 


-2004 


Brian P. Major 


-2003 


Gerald F. Gustus 


-2003 


Ted E. Teichert 


-2003 


Christopher G. Smith 


-2005 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 




REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


Ronald C. Ha]], Ch. 


-2006 


Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. 


-2003 


Norma Villareal 


-2003 


Thomas L. Grondine, Methuen 


-2003 


James A. Cuticchia 


-2004 


Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 


-2003 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2005 


Mark Ford, North Andover 


-2004 


Calvin A. Deyermond* 


-2006 


Daniel Fleming, Lawrence 


-2003 


* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of 




Ronald F. Ford, Methuen 


-2003 


Executive Office of Communities 




Kenneth Hamilton, Andover 


-2003 


and Development 








TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 


TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 



Earl G. Efinger 
Joan M. Lewis 
John R. Petty 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 
Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 
Christ Church Designee 



-2003 
-2003 
-2003 
-2003 
-2003 



Barbara Brandt-Saret - 2004 

Edward Cole - 2005 

Edward Morrissey - 2003 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty 



2003 



167 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 


-2003 


Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2003 


Margaret I. Jurgen 


-2005 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2004 


Debra R. Silberstein 


-2003 


Paul Bevacqua 


-2004 


Thomas E. Fardy 


-2004 


Peter F. Reilly 


-2005 


Harold J. Wright 


-2003 


Pamela H. Mitchell 


-2005 


Mary O'Donoghue 


-2004 


David W. Brown - Associate 


-2005 


Carl J. Byers 


-2005 


Nancy K. Jeton - Associate 


-2003 


Margaret M. Bradshaw 


-2005 


Stephen D. Anderson - Associate 


-2004 


Timothy L. Felter 


-2003 


Lynne S. Batchelder - Associate 


-2003 


PLANNING BOARD 




MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


Paul J. Salafia, Ch. 


-2007 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2005 


Susan W. Alovisetti 


-2003 


Carolyn Fantini 


-2004 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2003 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2004 


Linn N. Anderson 


-2004 


Ruth M. Dunbar 


-2005 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2006 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2003 


John J. McDonnell - Associate 


-2006 


Maria A. Rizzo 


-2003 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 


-2005 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2003 


Robert A. Pustell 


-2003 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2005 


Paul J. Finger 


-2004 


Norma A. Gammon 


-2005 


Thomas J. Murphy 


-2003 


James S. Batchelder 


-2003 


Marcia J. Miller 


-2003 


Dennis Ingram 


-2004 


Philip Sutherland 


-2004 


Raymond H. Flynn 


-2004 


Howard M. Kassler 


-2005 


Mark DeLisio 


-2004 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch. 


-2003 


Bruce Symmes 


-2004 


Candace Martin 


-2004 


Archibald D. Maclaren 


-2003 


Dr. Daniel E. Coleman 


-2005 


John R. Petty 


-2005 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 




TOWLE FUND 




Ann E. Constantine 


-2004 


Phillip F. Sullivan 


-2003 






Donna Dyer 


-2004 


CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




RETIREMENT BOARD 




John R. Dempsey. Ch. 


-2005 


James Cuticchia, Ch. 


-2005 


Annetta R. Freedman 


-2003 


Marianne O'Leary 


-2004 


Barbara Worcester 


-2003 


John C. Doherty 


-2003 


Gerald H. Silverman 


-2005 


James L. Edholm 


-2003 






Rodney P. Smith 


Open 



YOUTH COUNCIL 

Colleen Georgian 
Craig D. Gibson 



2005 
2005 



168 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DIST. COMM. 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 



Christian Huntress, Ch. 


-2003 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


-2003 


Diane R. Derby 


-2005 


John C. Doherty 


-2003 


Richard Bowen 


-2004 


John J. Lewis 


-2003 


Ron Abraham 


-2003 


Edward J. Mornssey 


-2003 


Brue S. Taylor 


-2003 


James M. Deyermond 


-2003 


Perry M. Raffi 


-2005 


Edward (Ted) Cole 


-2003 


Mary Bogan 


-2004 


Dorothy Volker 


-2003 


Brian Zinsmeister - Alt. 


-2005 


Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 


-2003 


James Sheldon - Alt. 


-2003 


Clifford A. Lawrence 


-2003 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 


RECYCLING COMMITTEE 




Mark B. Johnson, Ch. 


-2004 


Candy Dann, Ch. 


-2003 


Alan J. Champagne 


-2005 


James T. Curtis 


-2004 


Dr. Claudia L. Bach 


-2005 


Jamie Doucett 


-2005 


John J. Dnscoll 


-2004 


Joyce Ringleb 


-2004 


Tina B. Girdwood 


-2005 


Glenn A. Rogers, Jr. 


-2003 


Thomas R. Deso 


-2003 


Sharon Magnuson 


-2004 


Bernard R. Mornssey 


-2003 


Lisa Treadwell 


-2004 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 


IND. DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 


Paul Caselle, Ch. 


-2005 


Michael W. Morris, Esq., Ch. 


-2003 


John S. Bigelow 


-2005 


Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 


-2004 


Kenneth J. Russo 


-2004 


John E. Shuman 


-2004 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2003 






COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 




Justin J. Coppola, Ch. 


-2005 


Norma Villarreal, Co-Ch. 


-2004 


William C. O'Heaney 


-2004 


Robert Katz, Co.-Ch. 


-2004 


Maria Freccero 


-2004 


Keith Sherman 


-2005 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2004 


Barbara Neal 


-2004 


Donna Gorzela 


-2005 


Stefani T. Goldshein 


-2004 


Madelaine St. Amand 


-2003 


Mark Spencer 


-2004 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2005 


Adam Stone 


-2005 


Patricia Commane 


-2005 


Norman Rice 


-2004 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 




Joan Duff, Ch. 


-2005 


Kathleen M. Hess 


-2003 


Susan Garth Stott 


-2005 


Rosalie Konjoian 


-2003 


Victoria Johnston 


-2005 


Madhu Sridhar 


-2003 


Donald M. Williamson 


-2003 


Leo Lafond 


-2003 


Lawrence B. Morse 


-2003 


Cynthia J. Milne 


-2003 


Jeanne M. Madden 


-2004 


Ruby Easton 


-2003 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2005 


David Reilly 


-2003 


Sarah B. Young 


-2004 


Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2003 


Christopher D. Haynes 


Emeritus 






Lorene A. Comeau 


Emeritus 







169 



VISION 21 COMMITTEE 




BALLARD VALE/LOWELL JUNCTION AREA 


Bruce E. Earnley, Ch. 


-2005 


TRAFFIC TASK FORCE 




John R. Roberts 


-2003 


Raymond Hender, Ch. 


-2003 


Maria K. Bartlett 


-2005 


Douglas White 


-2003 


Amy L. Janovsky 


-2003 


Jean Verzola-Henry 


-2003 


Janice Burkholder 


-2004 


Audrey Nason 


-2003 


Ann M. Daly 


-2003 


Lawrence P. Johnson 


-2003 


Joseph A. Dorsey, Jr. 


-2005 


Joseph W. Watson 


-2003 


Alan F. French 


-2004 


Richard Nill 


-2003 


Clifford T. Markell 


-2005 


Arthur H. Barber 


-2003 


Carol Tanski 


-2004 


Michael Frishman 


-2003 


William J. Dalton 


-2003 


George H. Baxter 


-2003 


Raymond E. Hender - Selectmen' 


s Liaison 


Stan Franzeen 


-2003 


TOWN GOVERNMENT REVIEW COMM. 


MAIN STREET COMMITTEE 




Michael W. Morris, Ch. 


-2003 


Clifford T. Markell, Ch. 


-2003 


Paul C. Dow 


-2003 


John R. Daher 


-2003 


Julie Pike 


-2003 


Judith F. Wright 


-2003 


Ruth H. Dunbar 


-2003 


Abigail O'Hara 


-2003 


Mark Merntt 


-2003 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2003 


John D. O'Brien, Jr. 


-2003 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2003 


Paula R. Trespas 


-2003 


John C. Campbell 


-2003 


James D. Doherty, Ex. Officio 


-2003 


John A. Simko 


-2003 


Randall L. Hanson, Ex. Officio 


-2003 


Karen M. Herman 


-2003 


COUNCIL ON AGING 




ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 




Marhes Zammuto, Ch. 


-2004 


Barbara Brandt-Saret 


-2005 


Judith G. Trerotola 


-2003 


John T. Andreadis 


-2005 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2005 


Knstine Arakelian 


-2005 


Robert J. Schreiber, M.D. 


-2004 


Archibald D. Maclaren 


-2005 


Vicki P. Coderre 


-2005 


David J. Reilly 


-2005 


Martin Epstein 


-2005 






Lois Karfunkel 


-2004 


BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




Zeff Marusich 


-2003 


Joanne D. Dee 


-2003 


Patricia VanVleet 


-2003 


Carolyn Simko 


-2005 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2004 


Wendall Mattheson 


-2004 


INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 




GR. LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 


Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 


-2003 


John A. Petkus, Jr. 


-2004 


NORTHEAST SOLID WASTE COMM. REP. 


MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. 


John A. Petkus, Jr. 


-2003 


Stephen L. Colyer 


-2003 


MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 


KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 




Stephen L. Colyer 


-2003 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2003 


DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 


IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED 




Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2003 


MANAGEMENT COUNCIL 








John Pollano 


-2003 



170 



***************** 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

***************** 

Mailing Address: 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 



Business Hours at the Town Offices: 

8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 

(Community Development & Planning Department - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 9 1 1 

Fire Department - Business 978-623-8466 

Police Department - Business 978-475-041 1 

Animal Control Officer 978-623-8465 

Town Offices Switchboard 978-623-8200 

DCS Classes & Activities 978-623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 978-623-8350 

Human Resources Office 978-623-8530 

Memorial Hall Library 978-623-8400 

Senior Center 978-623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 978-623-8501 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.town.andover.ma.us 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 30,768 Square Miles: 32 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,768 controlled by Conservation Commission 
1,200 owned by A. V.I.S. 
889 owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 



171 



Andover's Tax Rate: 



$1 1.63 - Residential and Open Space 

$16.54 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 



When are Taxes Due: 



Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1 st - November 1 st - February 1 st - May 1 st 



Excise Tax Information: Call Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 



Recycling: 



Curbside Pickup: 



Every other week - recyclables (glass - all colors - newspapers, 
magazines, junk mail, office paper and paper board (cereal & cracker 
boxes), steel & tin cans, aluminum containers, #1 through #7 plastics 
and corrugated containers - crush/flatten) will be collected on the 
same day as the trash collection. Place recycling bin curbside by 7:00 
A.M. on your pick up day. 



Recycling Information & Complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 



Compost Site: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. Open 
year round for walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local newspapers. 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: BFI at 1-800-442-9006 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: 



Highway Division at 978-623-8426 or 
Dept. of Public Works at 978-623-8350 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 
their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. Andover 
has an Open Town Meeting which is generally held four 
weeks following the Town Election. 



Voter Registration Information: Town Clerk's Office 978-623-8255 

172 



Where To Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 



Ballfield Permits & Rentals 

Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electric) 

Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 



Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 

Town House Rental 

Zoning By-law Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 
at Town House 

Town Clerk's Office 



978-623-8450 



978-623-8255 



Building Division 978-623-8301 

(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 

Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Facilities Coordinator 
at Town House 

Building Division 



978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

or 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8466 

978-623-8466 

978-623-8350 

978-623-6450 



978-623-8301 
or 
Board of Appeals Office 978-623-83 1 5 



173 



HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 

senator@kennedy.senate.gov 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 

617-565-8519 

362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-2742 

i ohn_ken-y(2) / keiTv. senate, com 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional Distnct 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01 852 

978-459-0101 

2447 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

202-225-3411 

martin.meehan(o)rnail.house.gov 

State Senator: 



Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-1612 

stucker(2> senate .state . ma. us 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 473B, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2240 

rep.barryfmegold@hou.state.ma.us 

Barbara A. LTtalien (D) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1 , 7 & 8) 

State House, Boston, MA 02 1 3 3 

617-722-2000 

174 



* * 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



* * * * 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 





E. Hender Reginald S. Stapczynsk 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen Town Manager 



. Stapczynski ' I 



******** 



Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. 



Name andlA'fldress (Optional)